Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Katarzyna Silarska picture

Expand Messages
  • Philip Semanchuk
    Hi all, I was recently given a stack of old documents in which I found a picture of my father s mother s mother, Katarzyna Silarska and some of her
    Message 1 of 32 , Jul 24, 2004
      Hi all,
      I was recently given a stack of old documents in which I found a picture
      of my father's mother's mother, Katarzyna Silarska and some of her
      grandchildren. The photo is here:
      http://semanchuk.com/gen/surnames/silarski/SilarskaKatarzyna.jpg

      The people in the photo are:
      Back row, left to right:
      1) Kamila Drozd (daughter of Paul Drozd who was the son of Katarzyna S.)
      2) Zdzisl~aw Wierzbicki (son of Stefania Drozd who was the daughter of
      Katarzyna S.)

      Front row, left to right:
      3) Katarzyna Silarska (wife of Francis Drozd)
      4) Teresa Drozd (daughter of #7 Adam Drozd)
      5) Felicia Drozd (wife of #7 Adam, nee Hujsak)
      6) Czesl~aw Drozd (son of #7 Adam)
      7) Adam Drozd (son of Katarzyna S.)
      8) Tadeusz Drozd (son of #7 Adam)

      Katarzyna was born in Nadolany in 1866. This photo was probably taken in
      the 1940s in Nagorzany.

      Bye all
      Philip
    • Debbie Greenlee
      Madeline, Just so folks don t spend all night wondering about this, it s malęki boyszek and it s Polglish, a combination of Polish and English, not spoken
      Message 32 of 32 , Aug 13, 2012
        Madeline,

        Just so folks don't spend all night wondering about this, it's "malęki
        boyszek" and it's Polglish, a combination of Polish and English, not
        spoken in Poland however. It means little boy; małe is small and
        boyszek is the English word 'boy' with a Polish diminutive ending
        added on. Poles took an English word and tried to apply Polish grammar
        rules to the word 'boy' so it would be correct. Sort of.

        It's like saying, Łemkos or gminas. English speakers take the Polish
        word Łemko or gmina and make them grammatically correct for an
        _English_ word by adding an 's' to make it plural.

        Debbie

        crazyauntmad1 wrote:
        > My father never spoke any Polish to us children when we were growing
        up. After I was married and had a son, my father would say to my son
        malebcki bojszek (phonetical spelling) Does anyone recognize these
        words and can you tell me what it means???? Thank you, Madeline
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.