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Re: Wolcze, Austria, Poland

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  • mary osborne
    Hi, Janet, I hope you find that the village of Wolcze in which you are interested is the one you list as Wolcze (Vovche)/Turka/Lviv.  Vovche is the English
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 1, 2011
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      Hi, Janet,

      I hope you find that the village of Wolcze in which you are interested is the
      one you list as Wolcze (Vovche)/Turka/Lviv.  Vovche is the English
      transliteration of Бобча (if your pc can show Cyrillic letters), while Wolcze is
      its Polish spelling.  It is easy to find on maps.  If that is the right village
      for you (I hope, I hope!), we may have info to share.  My maiden name was Kohan
      (originally Kochan), and I grew up in Ramey, Clearfield County, PA.  I remember
      the name Danko from the nearby towns of Houtzdale and/or Osceola Mills, but it
      is a common Ukrainian name so I'd be surprised if they were your family.

      Audryj Danko (should be Andryj) from Wolcze traveled to the US in 1909.  On the
      same ship (in fact, on the same ship manifest page) were nine people from
      Boberka and Dydiowa, villages in the next valley to the west of Wolcze.  Stefan
      Danko traveled to the US in 1905 on the same ship as Iwan Bizyk from Boberka.
       My grandfather's sister married Timko Bizyk from Boberka.  They never came to
      the US. but their daughter did.  My grandfather's family (Basarab) was from
      another nearby village--Zurawin, the remains of which straddles the current
      Ukrainian-Polish border, a little northwest of Boberka.  They were Boyko
      (Ukrainian); if your relatives were Ukrainian and came from the same region,
      they were Boykos, too.

      The borders in that area shifted enough to confuse anyone.  In 1885 the area was
      in Galicia, in the Austria part of the Austria-Hungarian Empire.  At the end of
      WW I, the Empire ceased to exist and the nation of Poland was established, hence
      even if your father, born in 1923, was born in the same house as your
      grandfather, born in 1885, he was born in Poland.  Right after WW II, there was
      a massive border shift--probably that is when Wolcze ended up in Ukraine.  About
      1952 another smaller border shift occurred.

      I hope this info helps.

      Mary




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    • Matthew Hetrick
      Mary, Thank you, Thank you!  I haven t been able to find any info on Wolcze.  My Granfather, Iwan (John) Danko came to US in 1909 and 1923 when he finally
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 2, 2011
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        Mary,
        Thank you, Thank you! 

        I haven't been able to find any info on Wolcze.  My Granfather, Iwan (John)
        Danko came to US in 1909 and 1923 when he finally stayed.  He settled in Phila.
        PA.  My Grandmother (Baba) maiden name was Lukasiewicz and she was also from
        Wolcze.  They were married in 1914 in Wolcze.  Do you know where I could find
        their birth/marriage records.  They were Greek Othodox I believe.  I didn't know
        that Danko was a common name, because I can't find hardly any info, unless they
        all came to US!  Are there any websites you would recommend?  Thank you again
        for your kindness in helping me.  I have been looking for quite awhile.  You are
        a bright spot in my search!

        Janet 




        ________________________________
        From: mary osborne <marykosborne@...>
        To: bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, February 1, 2011 11:16:11 PM
        Subject: [bukowsko_triangle] Re: Wolcze, Austria, Poland

         
        Hi, Janet,

        I hope you find that the village of Wolcze in which you are interested is the
        one you list as Wolcze (Vovche)/Turka/Lviv.  Vovche is the English
        transliteration of Бобча (if your pc can show Cyrillic letters), while Wolcze is

        its Polish spelling.  It is easy to find on maps.  If that is the right village
        for you (I hope, I hope!), we may have info to share.  My maiden name was Kohan
        (originally Kochan), and I grew up in Ramey, Clearfield County, PA.  I remember
        the name Danko from the nearby towns of Houtzdale and/or Osceola Mills, but it
        is a common Ukrainian name so I'd be surprised if they were your family.

        Audryj Danko (should be Andryj) from Wolcze traveled to the US in 1909.  On the
        same ship (in fact, on the same ship manifest page) were nine people from
        Boberka and Dydiowa, villages in the next valley to the west of Wolcze.  Stefan
        Danko traveled to the US in 1905 on the same ship as Iwan Bizyk from Boberka.
         My grandfather's sister married Timko Bizyk from Boberka.  They never came to
        the US. but their daughter did.  My grandfather's family (Basarab) was from
        another nearby village--Zurawin, the remains of which straddles the current
        Ukrainian-Polish border, a little northwest of Boberka.  They were Boyko
        (Ukrainian); if your relatives were Ukrainian and came from the same region,
        they were Boykos, too.

        The borders in that area shifted enough to confuse anyone.  In 1885 the area was

        in Galicia, in the Austria part of the Austria-Hungarian Empire.  At the end of
        WW I, the Empire ceased to exist and the nation of Poland was established, hence

        even if your father, born in 1923, was born in the same house as your
        grandfather, born in 1885, he was born in Poland.  Right after WW II, there was
        a massive border shift--probably that is when Wolcze ended up in Ukraine.  About

        1952 another smaller border shift occurred.

        I hope this info helps.

        Mary

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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • mary osborne
        Hi, Janet, I must caution you that, though the Ellis Island records provide pretty convincing circumstantial evidence that the Wolcze you are seeking is the
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 3, 2011
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          Hi, Janet,

          I must caution you that, though the Ellis Island records provide pretty
          convincing circumstantial evidence that the Wolcze you are seeking is the one
          near my grandfather's village, there is no certainty.  I know there is another
          one along the San River directly west of Przemysl, and who knows how many others
          exist.  I learned the hard way by searching a Mormon Church microfilm for hours
          and hours, only to discover eventually that it was for the village of Smolnik
          alright--the OTHER village of Smolnik.

          Have you tried the Mormon Church microfilms? 

          These may not be exact co-ordinates for the Wolcze across the mountain from
          Zurawin but they are close:  49.20607N; 22.907867E  or  49º 12' 40"N; 22º 54'
          34"E. 


          I also found that Wolcze translates into English as "wolf."  Do you know how
          to use Google Translate?  I find it invaluable in doing research on the
          Internet--I am linguistically-challenged by speaking only English.    

          I don't know how long you have been receiving info from this wonderful group,
          but here is a copy of some advice I pulled from the list a while back but
          haven't gotten my act together well enough to try it out.
          ---------------------------------------------
          POLISH AND UKRAINIAN ARCHIVES ADVICE FROM BUKOWSKO GROUP:
          > State Archives, Warsaw, Poland and at the Central State Historical Archives of
          >Ukraine in Lviv.
          >
          > check out the Polish Archive system: http://www.archiwa. gov.pl/lang-
          >en/news.html(specifically the Przemysl Civil Archives)
          > Contact the L'viv Archeparchy to see if they've archived the baptismal/birth
          >records you need. Here's their web site though it's in Cyrillic:
          >http://orthodox. org.ua/win/ index.shtml or the L'viv Civil Archives:
          >http://www.archive. lviv.ua/
          > I think others on this list can speak to the general success you can expect
          >from either of the L'viv archives. Things might be even slower considering what
          >is being reported in the media about the flu situation in Ukraine.
          you might look for Roman Catholic records.... It was not uncommon for Greek
          Catholics and Roman Catholics to intermarry and have the events in the other
          person's church. In this case you'd probably need to contact the church itself,
          the Przemysl Archdiocesan Archives.
          ------------------------------------------
          Some time ago I was able to get some old--they define old as roughly 100 years
          or more ago--records from my grandfather's family before there was a Poland,
          from the National Archives in Rzeszow, Poland (civil archive). I e-mailed Sanok
          <apsanok@...> and then I don't know whom I was dealing with, the Sanok
          Branch or the "headquarters' in Rzeszow. Below is a pasted copy of how they
          identified themselves in correspondance. It wouldn't hurt to give them a try,
          especially since I had success there and our ancestral villages are not too far
          apart.
          ----------------------------------------------------------------- ARCHIWUM
          PAŃSTWOWE W RZESZOWIEThe State Archives in Rzeszów
            35-064 RZESZÓW , ul. Bożnicza 2, tel.: (0-17) 8529350 , 8501099; fax: 8538304
          0-606 898138; e-mail: aprzeszow@...; http: www.rzeszow.ap.gov.pl Oddzia
          ___________________________________
           
          I had a devil of a time with them. My first request for documents concerning
          another branch of my family went smoothly, though it took a long time. The
          second request, this time for Basarab records, again took a long time--and a lot
          of aggravation. When I wired the money they requested, they insisted that they
          did not receive the entire amount. They could not (or maybe would not) explain
          why. They kept insisting they were short-changed by 20 zloties, and they could
          give no explanation other than that an intermediary bank must have taken a fee.
          My bank insisted that they charged no extra fee the second time, nor was an
          intermediary bank involved in the transaction. I kept trying to get Dr. Jan
          Batsa to tell me how much I should now send them to cover the shortage AND
          whatever bank fee their own bank would charge. He claimed he could not tell me
          anything more than the amount of their own fee. Even though I tried to get
          through to him that if I sent enough to cover their fee and all the bank fees
          that I knew about, the same thing could happen repeatedly--that they would be
          short-changed repeatedly and I would be a lot poorer and still never get the
          records I wanted. They would not budge. Finally, in desperation--I really wanted
          those records badly--I sent them 60 zloties,the amount that they claimed to be
          short-changed plus two times more than the supposed intermediary bank fee. I
          figured that was cheaper than paying my own bank $40 a pop for each moneywire I
          sent. They never did say I sent them too much, nor did they offer to return it
          (an offer I would have refused if it had been made). It wasn't much money (at
          least to me; maybe it was to them). I just resent being made to feel I have been
          taken for a ride.
           
          I also got some records from the State Archives in Przemysl concerning a
          different branch of my family. They were wonderful to work with, efficient and
          co-operative.
           
          I have paid a bit of attention to the name Danko because I once had a clue that
          one of my great-grandmothers was surnamed Danko.  The Archives records proved
          that false.  Also there was a Dankow family in my other grandmother's
          village--Procisne, Poland, again not all that far from Wolcze.  I have also seen
          it spelled Dankiw.  Moral of the story--be open to spelling variations.
           
          One more thing, check out this website.  The brochure is beautiful, but I choke
          on the namby-pamby phrase "clearing the border zone" to describe what really
          happened there.  If you don't know the history of Bieszczady, you are in for a
          shock.  The village of Wolcze must be near the eastern edge of the park; it
          apparently was not destroyed.   My grandfather's village, spelled Zhuravyn
          here, must have been only a few miles from Wolcze. 
           http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:UEJYW9ll6FMJ:www.bieszczady.pl/download/pdf/broszura_NRPK_v.ENG.pdf+zhuravyn&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESgHOAvecqa_IatFNH8b7D3bE12TxOUPmBPHuWO9LNKs4lbRCXFsx1Uw9jEb-PEL1r-dycOZJfxzPUfUMx3Xpk62jTtVwvlpbd8AQnIn4ONUo0dUit86W5dJlCvIqO2ovYJV1Pcn&sig=AHIEtbQdz4so7rSl_vWP3rSA10WyxAx_nQ&pli=1

           
          Is that enough info to keep you going for a while?
           
          Mary
           
          P.S.  If you live in the Philadelphia area, we are back-fence neighbors just as
          our grandfathers probably were.  I live in Newark, Delaware.ły [branches]:
          38-500 Sanok, Rynek 10, tel.: (013) 4631999; e-mail: apsanok@...
          38-242 Skołyszyn k/Jasła, tel.: (013) 4491096; e-mail: apskolyszyn@...




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        • polskamom
          Mary, I have a print of a watercolor of the church in Smolnik, suitable for framing. I d like to send it to you. Are you interested? Debbie ... and hours, only
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 20, 2012
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            Mary,

            I have a print of a watercolor of the church in Smolnik, suitable for framing. I'd like to send it to you. Are you interested?

            Debbie

            --- In bukowsko_triangle@yahoogroups.com, mary osborne <marykosborne@...> wrote:

            and hours, only to discover eventually that it was for the village of Smolnik alright--the OTHER village of Smolnik.
          • mary osborne
            Debbie,   YESSSS!    But maybe the print you have is for the wrong Smolnik church.  My grandmother s church is in Gmina Lutowiska, on the San River.  It
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 21, 2012
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              Debbie,
               
              YESSSS! 
               
              But maybe the print you have is for the wrong Smolnik church.  My grandmother's church is in Gmina Lutowiska, on the San River.  It is a classic three-room Boyko structure covered in brown shingles.  An old, unkempt cemetery surrounded by a wooden fence is adjacent to the church.
               
              The church in the other Smolnik is, if I remember correctly, white masonry and is basically a rectangular shape.  It is located on the Oslawa River, nearer to Komancza and the Bukowsko triangle.  So probably this is what you have.   ;-(    Boohoo.
               
              If your print is the right church, I would be delighted to have it.  Please let me know the cost of sending it and how I can reimburse you.  
               
              Thank you!!!
               
              Mary O.

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