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Tube Web Spider

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  • Graeme Stroud
    Hi guys, There has been a bit of publicity recently about these tube web spiders that have invaded British ports from abroad. Not really sure why, seeing as
    Message 1 of 3 , May 1, 2009
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      Hi guys,

       

      There has been a bit of publicity recently about these tube web spiders that have invaded British ports from abroad.

      Not really sure why, seeing as they seem to have been in Britian for a couple of hundred years...

      But my question is, are there any native tube web spiders?

       

      I’ve been seeing these messy tube web retreats in walls all my life, growing up in North Kent, and they seem pretty common. If so, how do we tell the native from the import? I’ve put three photos in my ‘Graeme’s Photos’ album on the forum, one showing the spider’s retreat with no spider visible, one showing the spider at his entrance, (he only comes out after dark), and another picture showing the same spider in the top-left and a smaller specimen in the bottom-right. This photo also shows up the radiating ‘trigger’ threads.

       

      Is anyone able to identify the species from these photos?

      The location is Gravesend, Kent.

       

      Many thanks,

      Graeme Stroud
      Graevesend

      Comma Oil & Chemicals Limited
      Dering Way, Gravesend, Kent DA12 2QX

      (Registered in England: Number 2075698. Registered Office as above)

      (If the e-mail is received in error, inform the sender immediately and do not copy the e-mail, use its contents or disclose them to any unauthorised third party).
    • Malcolm Storey
      Hi Graeme, Haven t seen the news items, but assume it s Segestria florentina (up to 22mm). We have two other spp in family Segestriidae, both in Segestria: S.
      Message 2 of 3 , May 1, 2009
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        Hi Graeme,

        Haven’t seen the news items, but assume it’s Segestria florentina (up to 22mm).

         

        We have two other spp in family Segestriidae, both in Segestria: S. bavarica (up to 14mm, rocks and coastal cliffs, mainly in southwest) and S. senoculata ( “common”).

         

        The bracketed notes above are based on the comments in the Recorder database.

        HTH

        Malcolm

         

         

        From: bugclub@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bugclub@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Graeme Stroud
        Sent: 01 May 2009 12:04
        To: bugclub@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [bugclub] Tube Web Spider

         

        Hi guys,

         

        There has been a bit of publicity recently about these tube web spiders that have invaded British ports from abroad.

        Not really sure why, seeing as they seem to have been in Britian for a couple of hundred years...

        But my question is, are there any native tube web spiders?

         

        I’ve been seeing these messy tube web retreats in walls all my life, growing up in North Kent, and they seem pretty common. If so, how do we tell the native from the import? I’ve put three photos in my ‘Graeme’s Photos’ album on the forum, one showing the spider’s retreat with no spider visible, one showing the spider at his entrance, (he only comes out after dark), and another picture showing the same spider in the top-left and a smaller specimen in the bottom-right. This photo also shows up the radiating ‘trigger’ threads.

         

        Is anyone able to identify the species from these photos?

        The location is Gravesend, Kent.

         

        Many thanks,

        Graeme Stroud
        Graevesend




        Comma Oil & Chemicals Limited
        Dering Way, Gravesend, Kent DA12 2QX

        (Registered in England: Number 2075698. Registered Office as above)

        (If the e-mail is received in error, inform the sender immediately and do not copy the e-mail, use its contents or disclose them to any unauthorised third party).

         

      • Graeme Stroud
        Thanks Malcolm, I ve looked up all three species now, and I m still not sure.I suppose my childhood chums were mostly senoculata, but I think this one s too
        Message 3 of 3 , May 1, 2009
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          Thanks Malcolm,

           

          I’ve looked up all three species now, and I’m still not sure.

          I suppose my childhood chums were mostly senoculata, but I think this one’s too big and too black.

           

          I’ll see if I can coax it out for a chat and have a good look at its teeth . . .

           

          Cheers,

          Graeme

           

           

          From: bugclub@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bugclub@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Malcolm Storey
          Sent: 01 May 2009 12:37
          To: bugclub@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [bugclub] Tube Web Spider

           




          Hi Graeme,

          Haven’t seen the news items, but assume it’s Segestria florentina (up to 22mm).

           

          We have two other spp in family Segestriidae, both in Segestria: S. bavarica (up to 14mm, rocks and coastal cliffs, mainly in southwest) and S. senoculata ( “common”).

           

          The bracketed notes above are based on the comments in the Recorder database.

          HTH

          Malcolm

           

           

          From: bugclub@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bugclub@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Graeme Stroud
          Sent: 01 May 2009 12:04
          To: bugclub@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [bugclub] Tube Web Spider

           

          Hi guys,

           

          There has been a bit of publicity recently about these tube web spiders that have invaded British ports from abroad.

          Not really sure why, seeing as they seem to have been in Britian for a couple of hundred years...

          But my question is, are there any native tube web spiders?

           

          I’ve been seeing these messy tube web retreats in walls all my life, growing up in North Kent, and they seem pretty common. If so, how do we tell the native from the import? I’ve put three photos in my ‘Graeme’s Photos’ album on the forum, one showing the spider’s retreat with no spider visible, one showing the spider at his entrance, (he only comes out after dark), and another picture showing the same spider in the top-left and a smaller specimen in the bottom-right. This photo also shows up the radiating ‘trigger’ threads.

           

          Is anyone able to identify the species from these photos?

          The location is Gravesend, Kent.

           

          Many thanks,

          Graeme Stroud
          Graevesend





          Comma Oil & Chemicals Limited
          Dering Way, Gravesend, Kent DA12 2QX

          (Registered in England: Number 2075698. Registered Office as above)

          (If the e-mail is received in error, inform the sender immediately and do not copy the e-mail, use its contents or disclose them to any unauthorised third party).

           

          Comma Oil & Chemicals Limited
          Dering Way, Gravesend, Kent DA12 2QX

          (Registered in England: Number 2075698. Registered Office as above)

          (If the e-mail is received in error, inform the sender immediately and do not copy the e-mail, use its contents or disclose them to any unauthorised third party).
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