Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Katydid (Bug or Insect)

Expand Messages
  • Robert Womack
    Anyone know and why? Hi Robert The katydids (family Tettigoniidae) are grouped together with other families such as the crickets in the order Orthoptera. See
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 3, 2001
      Anyone know and why?

      Hi Robert

      The katydids (family Tettigoniidae) are grouped together with other families such as the crickets in the order Orthoptera. See for example the following sites:

      http://csssrvr.entnem.ufl.edu/~walker/handbook/hdbkhmpg.htm

      http://viceroy.eeb.uconn.edu/interkey/Titlepg

      The insects known as bugs and true bugs are classified in the order Heteroptera. See for example:

      http://phylogeny.arizona.edu/tree/eukaryotes/animals/arthropoda/hexapoda/hemiptera/heteroptera.html

      The Bug Club
    • Storey, M.W.
      ... Hi Robert, Insects includes all animals where the adult has 6 legs. This includes butterflies, moths, dragonflies, grasshopers and katydids. Bugs is a
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 5, 2001
        Robert Womack wrote:
        >
        > Anyone know and why?
        >
        Hi Robert,
        "Insects" includes all animals where the adult has 6 legs.
        This includes butterflies, moths, dragonflies, grasshopers and katydids.
        "Bugs" is a slang term which is variously applied to "insects",
        or "insects and other invertebrates"
        (not to mention viruses and/or bacteria)
        Even the computer "bug" is said to have derived from Grace Hopper
        (the inventor of the COBL computer language) finding a dead
        moth inside a broken down computer in the paleo-computer age
        of the 1940's.
        Entomologists use the term "True Bugs" for the Heteroptera
        which are insects characterised by piercing mouth parts
        and forewings which are thickened and opaque except but with
        a thin transparent triangle at the tip.
        Malcolm Storey
        http://www.bioimages.org.uk/
      • cmsbobwafret
        This was a question my grandson, a first grader, had to answer. Do not know why a teacher would ask such a question of a first grader. Thank you very much for
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 17, 2001
          This was a question my grandson, a first grader, had to answer. Do
          not know why a teacher would ask such a question of a first grader.

          Thank you very much for your response.

          Robert Womack

          --- In bugclub@y..., "Storey, M.W." <malcolms@l...> wrote:
          > Robert Womack wrote:
          > >
          > > Anyone know and why?
          > >
          > Hi Robert,
          > "Insects" includes all animals where the adult has 6 legs.
          > This includes butterflies, moths, dragonflies, grasshopers and
          katydids.
          > "Bugs" is a slang term which is variously applied to "insects",
          > or "insects and other invertebrates"
          > (not to mention viruses and/or bacteria)
          > Even the computer "bug" is said to have derived from Grace Hopper
          > (the inventor of the COBL computer language) finding a dead
          > moth inside a broken down computer in the paleo-computer age
          > of the 1940's.
          > Entomologists use the term "True Bugs" for the Heteroptera
          > which are insects characterised by piercing mouth parts
          > and forewings which are thickened and opaque except but with
          > a thin transparent triangle at the tip.
          > Malcolm Storey
          > http://www.bioimages.org.uk/
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.