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Re: ID help needed. Can anyone help with these bees?

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  • Matthew Smith
    Nigel The fist two photos are an Osmia. Most likely to be Osmia caerulescens. The other is an Osmia of some sort, though I can t quite see enough to decide
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 1 5:37 AM
      Nigel

      The fist two photos are an Osmia. Most likely to be Osmia caerulescens.
      The other is an 'Osmia' of some sort, though I can't quite see enough to
      decide is its an Osmia or a Hoplitis (too early on Sunday morning).

      As for the rest of the mystery aculeates:

      1) male Andrena sp
      2)not an Andrena fulva male - is has pollen baskets full of pollen which
      makes it female, not fluffy or 'orange' enough for A. fulva. Possibly
      A.bicolor female.
      3) Andrena female, possibly A.nigroaenea
      4)Osmia caerulescens female
      5) Colletes sp. Can't do much more without a specimen with these.
      6) male Hylaeus sp, probably H.communis but would need to see a picture
      face on to decide.
      7)Probably a species of Crossocerus (solitary wasp). Lots of small black
      species.
      8)Anthophora sp, possibly A.bimaculata or A.furcata

      Regards

      Matt Smith




      Message text written by INTERNET:british_insects@yahoogroups.com
      >
      Hi everyone,
      I have photographed two 'medium-small'solitary bees in my garden
      today. The photos can be seen at:
      http://website.lineone.net/~nigin/Mystery%20Bees%202.htm

      I think one is a small Osmia species, using my bee posts in the
      garden. The second could be a Hoplitis species with a bright orangey
      pollen brush. Any suggestions would be very welcome.

      <
    • Nigel Jones
      Matt, You are a hero! Many thanks for so many suggestions for my garden bees. When I eventually get around to collecting some voucher specimens, it will make
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 1 12:05 PM
        Matt, You are a hero! Many thanks for so many suggestions for my
        garden bees. When I eventually get around to collecting some voucher
        specimens, it will make it a lot easier for me to try and ID bees,
        now that I can have a rough idea of what genera/species I might be
        looking at. I can't believe I did not notice the pollen basket on the
        Andrena! Elementary stuff, which I must be careful about.

        Yours most gratefully
        Nigel Jones

        --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Smith
        <matsmith1@c...> wrote:
        > Nigel
        >
        > The fist two photos are an Osmia. Most likely to be Osmia
        caerulescens.
        > The other is an 'Osmia' of some sort, though I can't quite see
        enough to
        > decide is its an Osmia or a Hoplitis (too early on Sunday morning).
        >
        > As for the rest of the mystery aculeates:
        >
        > 1) male Andrena sp
        > 2)not an Andrena fulva male - is has pollen baskets full of pollen
        which
        > makes it female, not fluffy or 'orange' enough for A. fulva.
        Possibly
        > A.bicolor female.
        > 3) Andrena female, possibly A.nigroaenea
        > 4)Osmia caerulescens female
        > 5) Colletes sp. Can't do much more without a specimen with these.
        > 6) male Hylaeus sp, probably H.communis but would need to see a
        picture
        > face on to decide.
        > 7)Probably a species of Crossocerus (solitary wasp). Lots of small
        black
        > species.
        > 8)Anthophora sp, possibly A.bimaculata or A.furcata
        >
        > Regards
        >
        > Matt Smith
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Message text written by INTERNET:british_insects@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > Hi everyone,
        > I have photographed two 'medium-small'solitary bees in my garden
        > today. The photos can be seen at:
        > http://website.lineone.net/~nigin/Mystery%20Bees%202.htm
        >
        > I think one is a small Osmia species, using my bee posts in the
        > garden. The second could be a Hoplitis species with a bright
        orangey
        > pollen brush. Any suggestions would be very welcome.
        >
        > <
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