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Re: [british_insects] Digest Number 134 - ladybird

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  • Paul Mabbott
    Dear Tim, Chris Raper has suggested that this might be a variant of the 18-spot ladybird - Myrrha octodecimguttata. Certainly if you look at one of these and
    Message 1 of 3 , May 1, 2003
      Dear Tim,
      Chris Raper has suggested that this might be a variant of the 18-spot
      ladybird - Myrrha octodecimguttata. Certainly if you look at one of these
      and imagine the spots on the elytron (especially in the scutellar area)
      expanded then everything else is right. I don't think anything like this
      occurs in Britain (but I know next to nothing!). Perhaps there are related
      species?
      Best wishes, Paul

      Went through the resent posting about ladybirds, and I still haven't
      identified one of mine. it may not even be a ladybird. anyone seen
      this one:
      http://www.geocities.com/tim300cx5/images/1z7lady3.jpg

      IDed. ladybirds:
      http://www.geocities.com/tim300cx5/orders/coleoptera.htm
    • Tim Salazar
      thank for the help. It may be a variant or a close relative found here. I found it in Beulah, Colorado USA at an elevation of 6500 - 7000 feet above sea
      Message 2 of 3 , May 1, 2003
        thank for the help. It may be a variant or a close relative found
        here. I found it in Beulah, Colorado USA at an elevation of 6500 -
        7000 feet above sea level. Beulah is near Pueblo, CO. The main
        differnce I see is the black head and thorax. I added you and your
        site to notes to self section on my Coleoptera page, for now at
        least. Do you mind?

        --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Mabbott" <peter-
        mabbott@s...> wrote:
        > Dear Tim,
        > Chris Raper has suggested that this might be a variant of the 18-
        spot
        > ladybird - Myrrha octodecimguttata. Certainly if you look at one of
        these
        > and imagine the spots on the elytron (especially in the scutellar
        area)
        > expanded then everything else is right. I don't think anything like
        this
        > occurs in Britain (but I know next to nothing!). Perhaps there are
        related
        > species?
        > Best wishes, Paul
        >
        > Went through the resent posting about ladybirds, and I still haven't
        > identified one of mine. it may not even be a ladybird. anyone seen
        > this one:
        > http://www.geocities.com/tim300cx5/images/1z7lady3.jpg
        >
        > IDed. ladybirds:
        > http://www.geocities.com/tim300cx5/orders/coleoptera.htm
      • Keith Edkins
        ... Ah, Colorado, that s different. It looks a bit like the picture of Mulsantina picta at http://www.uoguelph.ca/~samarsha/lady-beetles.htm (which spells it
        Message 3 of 3 , May 2, 2003
          --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, "Tim Salazar"
          <tim300cx5@y...> wrote:
          > thank for the help. It may be a variant or a close relative found
          > here. I found it in Beulah, Colorado USA at an elevation of 6500 -
          > 7000 feet above sea level. Beulah is near Pueblo, CO. The main
          > differnce I see is the black head and thorax. I added you and your
          > site to notes to self section on my Coleoptera page, for now at
          > least. Do you mind?
          >

          Ah, Colorado, that's different. It looks a bit like the picture of
          Mulsantina picta at http://www.uoguelph.ca/~samarsha/lady-beetles.htm
          (which spells it Mulsantia) - although other pictures allegedly of
          the same species look very different (so perhaps it's a variable
          species?).

          Keith
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