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How many UK species have you seen?

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  • Malcolm Storey
    How many UK species (taxa) have you seen? http://markgtelfer.co.uk/all-taxa-listing/ Come on somebody - get me off the bottom! Otherwise known as a p***ing
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 16, 2010
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      How many UK species (taxa) have you seen?
      http://markgtelfer.co.uk/all-taxa-listing/

      Come on somebody - get me off the bottom!

      Otherwise known as a p***ing contest!
      Malcolm Storey
      www.bioimages.org.uk
    • Brian
      Hi I had the first real insect day of the year at Rainham Marsh RSPB reserve in Essex today - 2 Small White 4 Peacock 1 Speckled Wood 2 7-spot Ladybirds 5
      Message 2 of 13 , Apr 15, 2010
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        Hi

        I had the first real 'insect' day of the year at Rainham Marsh RSPB reserve
        in Essex today -
        2 Small White
        4 Peacock
        1 Speckled Wood
        2 7-spot Ladybirds
        5 assorted Bumble-bees
        40+ bee-flies Bombylius major - more than I've ever seen in one place
        before.

        There was also a Holly Blue with an un-developed hind wing, or an extra
        wing - see

        http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_B031.jpg and

        http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_B031-2.jpg

        Has anyone seen this before?

        Brian Price
      • Thomas Stevenson
        An odd sight today: A small bumble bee was busy on Red Deadnettle when a Bee Fly appeared hovering about 10cm from the Bee. It then darted in hitting the
        Message 3 of 13 , Apr 15, 2010
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          An odd sight today: A small bumble bee was busy on Red Deadnettle when a Bee Fly appeared hovering about 10cm from the Bee. It then darted in hitting the Bumble Bee knocking it off the flower. This happened about 6 or 8 times before the Fly moved off and probed another flower a metre away from the bee for nectar. Sorry I cant be more precise about the species as I am not an expert. it may well be that this is common behaviour but I would be interested in comments?

          Tom

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Andrew Stagg
          Brian, It appears that your holly blue has failed to expand its hind wing properly. Quite a common occurrence on captive specimens of all species - often
          Message 4 of 13 , Apr 16, 2010
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            Brian,
            It appears that your holly blue has failed to expand its hind wing properly. Quite a common occurrence on captive specimens of all species - often suggests a lack of humidity during emergence.
            Andrew

            From: british_insects@yahoogroups.com [mailto:british_insects@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brian
            Sent: 15 April 2010 20:42
            To: british_insects@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [british_insects] Strange Holly Blue



            Hi

            I had the first real 'insect' day of the year at Rainham Marsh RSPB reserve
            in Essex today -
            2 Small White
            4 Peacock
            1 Speckled Wood
            2 7-spot Ladybirds
            5 assorted Bumble-bees
            40+ bee-flies Bombylius major - more than I've ever seen in one place
            before.

            There was also a Holly Blue with an un-developed hind wing, or an extra
            wing - see

            http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_B031.jpg and

            http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_B031-2.jpg

            Has anyone seen this before?

            Brian Price



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Brian
            Hi all Can anyone help me with this small beetle, shot at Rainham Marsh RSPB last week. http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_B011.jpg The closest I can get in
            Message 5 of 13 , Apr 20, 2010
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              Hi all

              Can anyone help me with this small beetle, shot at Rainham Marsh RSPB last
              week.

              http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_B011.jpg

              The closest I can get in my books is Cantharsis livida, but I'm usually
              wrong.
              By the way, what is the scientific name for the knobbly bits on the
              antennae?

              TIA

              Brian
            • Philippe Moniotte
              ... Cheers Philippe ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 13 , Apr 20, 2010
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                >Its a Cereal Leaf Beetle, Oulema melanopus.
                Cheers
                Philippe


                Le 20-avr.-10 à 19:18, Brian a écrit :

                >
                > Hi all
                >
                > Can anyone help me with this small beetle, shot at Rainham Marsh
                > RSPB last
                > week.
                >
                > http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_B011.jpg
                >
                > The closest I can get in my books is Cantharsis livida, but I'm
                > usually
                > wrong.
                > By the way, what is the scientific name for the knobbly bits on the
                > antennae?
                >
                > TIA
                >
                > Brian
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Steve Covey
                Hi Brian, the antennae are made up of a number of segments and depending upon the shape of each individual segment the anntenae look either smooth or knobbly.
                Message 7 of 13 , Apr 20, 2010
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                  Hi Brian,
                  the antennae are made up of a number of segments and depending upon the shape of each individual segment the anntenae look either smooth or knobbly. The first segment [nearest the head] is called the 'scape' and is quite often longer than the others. The second is much shorter and is called the 'pedicel'; the rest together is called the 'flagellum'. Some species have very long scapes with the rest of the antenna hinging on this [such as the ants]. This type of antenna is called 'elbowed' or 'geniculate'.
                  HTH.
                  Cheers,

                  Steve [VC7/8]
                  http://www.wiltshiredragonflies.org
                  http://www.wildlife-galleries.co.uk/gallery2/main.php
                  http://wiltshire-dragonfly-news.blogspot.com/
                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/od0man/


                  This mail is a natural product. The
                  slight variation in spelling and
                  grammar enhance its individual
                  character and beauty and in no
                  way are to be considered flaws
                  or defects.




                  ________________________________
                  From: Brian <brian@...>
                  To: british_insects@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tue, 20 April, 2010 18:18:25
                  Subject: [british_insects] Beetle for ID



                  Hi all

                  Can anyone help me with this small beetle, shot at Rainham Marsh RSPB last
                  week.

                  http://www.secalis co.uk/Files/ D1004_B011. jpg

                  The closest I can get in my books is Cantharsis livida, but I'm usually
                  wrong.
                  By the way, what is the scientific name for the knobbly bits on the
                  antennae?

                  TIA

                  Brian







                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Brian
                  ... From: Philippe Moniotte ... Cheers Philippe ... Philippe, thank you for the ID, much appreciated. And thanks to Steve for the antennae info. I d come
                  Message 8 of 13 , Apr 20, 2010
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                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Philippe Moniotte"

                    >Its a Cereal Leaf Beetle, Oulema melanopus.
                    Cheers
                    Philippe


                    Le 20-avr.-10 à 19:18, Brian a écrit :

                    >
                    > Hi all
                    >
                    > Can anyone help me with this small beetle, shot at Rainham Marsh
                    > RSPB last
                    > week.
                    >
                    > http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_B011.jpg
                    >

                    Philippe, thank you for the ID, much appreciated.
                    And thanks to Steve for the antennae info. I'd come accross most the terms
                    before without knowing exactly what they meant.

                    Brian
                  • Chris
                    I had a conversation with my mother about this exact same behaviour just last week. Turned out she was describing female & male Anthophora plumipes - the
                    Message 9 of 13 , Apr 21, 2010
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                      I had a conversation with my mother about this exact same behaviour just last week. Turned out she was describing female & male Anthophora plumipes - the females look quite like small Bombus lapidarius (red-tailed bumblebee) and the males look like the carder bee Bombus pascuorum but behave in a similar manner to a bee-fly in that they dart about much quicker than most bees.

                      Hope that helps?

                      --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Stevenson" <thomas.stevenson@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > An odd sight today: A small bumble bee was busy on Red Deadnettle when a Bee Fly appeared hovering about 10cm from the Bee. It then darted in hitting the Bumble Bee knocking it off the flower. This happened about 6 or 8 times before the Fly moved off and probed another flower a metre away from the bee for nectar. Sorry I cant be more precise about the species as I am not an expert. it may well be that this is common behaviour but I would be interested in comments?
                      >
                      > Tom
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • Brian
                      Hi Help required for two more I photographed yesterday in the Lea Valley NNR at Cheshunt. I ve made a new years resolution to try and ID everything before I
                      Message 10 of 13 , Apr 28, 2010
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                        Hi
                        Help required for two more I photographed yesterday in the Lea Valley NNR at
                        Cheshunt. I've made a new years resolution to try and ID everything before I
                        ask for help, no matter how often I'm wrong, so here goes:
                        Could this hoverfly, which appeared to be chasing a Carder Bee, be
                        Criorhina asilica?
                        http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_D004.jpg
                        http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_D005.jpg

                        and is this beetle Grammoptera ruficornis?

                        http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_D013.jpg

                        Your help is much appreciated.

                        Brian
                      • Philippe Moniotte
                        The beetle is Phytoecia cylindrica, which , I believe, is considered as a rarity. However, I just saw one here in Belgium today, so that perhaps it s a very
                        Message 11 of 13 , Apr 28, 2010
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                          The beetle is Phytoecia cylindrica, which , I believe, is considered
                          as a rarity. However, I just saw one here in Belgium today, so that
                          perhaps it's a very favorable year for them (never seen it before).
                          I'd say the bee is a male Andrena sp., but, as they are all very much
                          alike, I wouldn't go further than that...
                          Cheers
                          Philippe
                          www.entomopix.eu


                          Le 28-avr.-10 à 16:27, Brian a écrit :

                          > Hi
                          > Help required for two more I photographed yesterday in the Lea
                          > Valley NNR at
                          > Cheshunt. I've made a new years resolution to try and ID everything
                          > before I
                          > ask for help, no matter how often I'm wrong, so here goes:
                          > Could this hoverfly, which appeared to be chasing a Carder Bee, be
                          > Criorhina asilica?
                          > http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_D004.jpg
                          > http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_D005.jpg
                          >
                          > and is this beetle Grammoptera ruficornis?
                          >
                          > http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_D013.jpg
                          >
                          > Your help is much appreciated.
                          >
                          > Brian
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------
                          >
                          > We hope you will not want to unsubscribe! But to do so, send an
                          > email to:
                          > british_insects-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                          >
                          > Remember: You can always set your subscription to "daily digest" if
                          > too many emails are clogging up your inbox!
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • Alan Phillips
                          Brian, Your hoverfly is a male Andrena sp. and the bumble probably B. pratorum. Alan
                          Message 12 of 13 , Apr 28, 2010
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                            Brian, Your 'hoverfly' is a male Andrena sp. and the bumble probably B. pratorum.

                            Alan

                            --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, "Brian" <brian@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi
                            > Help required for two more I photographed yesterday in the Lea Valley NNR at
                            > Cheshunt. I've made a new years resolution to try and ID everything before I
                            > ask for help, no matter how often I'm wrong, so here goes:
                            > Could this hoverfly, which appeared to be chasing a Carder Bee, be
                            > Criorhina asilica?
                            > http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_D004.jpg
                            > http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_D005.jpg
                            >
                            > and is this beetle Grammoptera ruficornis?
                            >
                            > http://www.secalis.co.uk/Files/D1004_D013.jpg
                            >
                            > Your help is much appreciated.
                            >
                            > Brian
                            >
                          • Brian
                            ... From: Philippe Moniotte The beetle is Phytoecia cylindrica, which , I believe, is considered as a rarity. However, I just saw one here in Belgium
                            Message 13 of 13 , Apr 29, 2010
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                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "Philippe Moniotte"

                              The beetle is Phytoecia cylindrica, which , I believe, is considered
                              as a rarity. However, I just saw one here in Belgium today, so that
                              perhaps it's a very favorable year for them (never seen it before).
                              I'd say the bee is a male Andrena sp., but, as they are all very much
                              alike, I wouldn't go further than that...
                              Cheers
                              Philippe
                              www.entomopix.eu
                              ____________________________________________

                              Thanks, Phillippe and Alan.

                              Of course it was a bee, not a hoverfly - my insect brain isn't in gear yet
                              after the winter break :-)
                              I've come accross another recent report of P cylindrica in England, so as
                              you say it may be a good year for them. There were about 20+ of them when I
                              photographed mine.

                              Brian
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