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  • Gordon Jarvis
    Hello I don t expect an ID but on 26/02 I saw a number of insects in a woodland pond. They appeared to be using leaves to camouflage themselves. I have
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 27, 2009
      Hello

      I don't expect an ID but on 26/02 I saw a number of insects in a woodland
      pond. They appeared to be using leaves to camouflage themselves. I have
      uploaded a photo to gordons photos:-

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/british_insects/photos/album/2008021749/pic/list;jsessionid=406FA02B06C5CB

      Can anyone tell me what family it might be from.

      Regards
      Gordon

      --
      Gordon Jarvis
      Peasmarsh (VC14)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Malcolm Storey
      Looks like Nepa cinerea, Water Scorpion. Think the family is Nepidae. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nepa_cinerea01.jpg HTH Malcolm From:
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 28, 2009
        Looks like Nepa cinerea, Water Scorpion. Think the family is Nepidae.



        http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nepa_cinerea01.jpg



        HTH

        Malcolm



        From: british_insects@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:british_insects@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gordon Jarvis
        Sent: 27 February 2009 17:30
        To: British Insects
        Subject: [british_insects] Unknown



        Hello

        I don't expect an ID but on 26/02 I saw a number of insects in a woodland
        pond. They appeared to be using leaves to camouflage themselves. I have
        uploaded a photo to gordons photos:-

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/british_insects/photos/album/2008021749/pic/li
        st;jsessionid=406FA02B06C5CB

        Can anyone tell me what family it might be from.

        Regards
        Gordon

        --
        Gordon Jarvis
        Peasmarsh (VC14)

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Matt Smith
        Caddisfly larvae in their leaf cases.    If they are in a pond at this time of year then they are almost certainly from the family Limnephilidae. 
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 28, 2009
          Caddisfly larvae in their leaf cases. 
           
          If they are in a pond at this time of year then they are almost certainly from the family Limnephilidae.  Definately not the water scorpion Nepa, if you look you can see a nice round head capsule at the front of the beast which Nepa lacks
           
          Matt

          --- On Fri, 27/2/09, Gordon Jarvis <Gordon.Jarvis@...> wrote:

          From: Gordon Jarvis <Gordon.Jarvis@...>
          Subject: [british_insects] Unknown
          To: "British Insects" <british_insects@yahoogroups.com>
          Date: Friday, 27 February, 2009, 5:30 PM






          Hello

          I don't expect an ID but on 26/02 I saw a number of insects in a woodland
          pond. They appeared to be using leaves to camouflage themselves. I have
          uploaded a photo to gordons photos:-

          http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/british_ insects/photos/ album/2008021749 /pic/list; jsessionid= 406FA02B06C5CB

          Can anyone tell me what family it might be from.

          Regards
          Gordon

          --
          Gordon Jarvis
          Peasmarsh (VC14)

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Malcolm Storey
          Yes, agreed. Was trying to make the leaf into part of the insect! Malcolm From: british_insects@yahoogroups.com [mailto:british_insects@yahoogroups.com] On
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 1, 2009
            Yes, agreed. Was trying to make the leaf into part of the insect!

            Malcolm



            From: british_insects@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:british_insects@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Matt Smith
            Sent: 28 February 2009 16:13
            To: british_insects@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [british_insects] Unknown



            Caddisfly larvae in their leaf cases.

            If they are in a pond at this time of year then they are almost certainly
            from the family Limnephilidae. Definately not the water scorpion Nepa, if
            you look you can see a nice round head capsule at the front of the beast
            which Nepa lacks

            Matt

            --- On Fri, 27/2/09, Gordon Jarvis <Gordon.Jarvis@...
            <mailto:Gordon.Jarvis%40googlemail.com> > wrote:

            From: Gordon Jarvis <Gordon.Jarvis@...
            <mailto:Gordon.Jarvis%40googlemail.com> >
            Subject: [british_insects] Unknown
            To: "British Insects" <british_insects@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:british_insects%40yahoogroups.com> >
            Date: Friday, 27 February, 2009, 5:30 PM

            Hello

            I don't expect an ID but on 26/02 I saw a number of insects in a woodland
            pond. They appeared to be using leaves to camouflage themselves. I have
            uploaded a photo to gordons photos:-

            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/british_ insects/photos/ album/2008021749
            /pic/list; jsessionid= 406FA02B06C5CB

            Can anyone tell me what family it might be from.

            Regards
            Gordon

            --
            Gordon Jarvis
            Peasmarsh (VC14)

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Craig Macadam
            Hi Gordon, Your mystery insect is most likely Glyphotaelius pellucidus. This species creates its case out of dead leaves and often has other bits and pieces
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 1, 2009
              Hi Gordon,

              Your mystery insect is most likely Glyphotaelius pellucidus. This
              species creates its case out of dead leaves and often has other bits
              and pieces of dead vegetation at the rear end. Typically found in
              still waters. Potamophylax cingulatus makes a similar case however it
              is typically found in moderate to swift flowing water. If the case
              was triangular in cross-section and found in a shallow swamp it would
              be Phacopteryx brevipennis.

              Hope this helps,

              Craig.

              --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, Gordon Jarvis
              <Gordon.Jarvis@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello
              >
              > I don't expect an ID but on 26/02 I saw a number of insects in a
              woodland
              > pond. They appeared to be using leaves to camouflage themselves. I have
              > uploaded a photo to gordons photos:-
              >
              >
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/british_insects/photos/album/2008021749/pic/list;jsessionid=406FA02B06C5CB
              >
              > Can anyone tell me what family it might be from.
              >
              > Regards
              > Gordon
              >
              > --
              > Gordon Jarvis
              > Peasmarsh (VC14)
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Gordon Jarvis
              Hi Craig It was one of about 6 which I found in a shallow swampy woodland pond. They were at the point where the water flows out over a low gate, the water at
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 1, 2009
                Hi Craig

                It was one of about 6 which I found in a shallow swampy woodland pond. They
                were at the point where the water flows out over a low gate, the water at
                that point was clear and only about 2inch deep..

                I googled 'Glyphotaelius pellucidus' and got the website of biopix.com the
                cases in their photos were very similar to the variety of cases that I saw.

                Thanks everyone now I have some idea of what I am looking for I will revisit
                it later and see if I can find the adult. Can you suggest the best time of
                the year to check ?

                Regards

                Gordon





                2009/3/1 Craig Macadam <craig.macadam@...>

                > Hi Gordon,
                >
                > Your mystery insect is most likely Glyphotaelius pellucidus. This
                > species creates its case out of dead leaves and often has other bits
                > and pieces of dead vegetation at the rear end. Typically found in
                > still waters. Potamophylax cingulatus makes a similar case however it
                > is typically found in moderate to swift flowing water. If the case
                > was triangular in cross-section and found in a shallow swamp it would
                > be Phacopteryx brevipennis.
                >
                > Hope this helps,
                >
                > Craig.
                >
                > --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com <british_insects%40yahoogroups.com>,
                > Gordon Jarvis
                >
                > <Gordon.Jarvis@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Hello
                > >
                > > I don't expect an ID but on 26/02 I saw a number of insects in a
                > woodland
                > > pond. They appeared to be using leaves to camouflage themselves. I have
                > > uploaded a photo to gordons photos:-
                > >
                > >
                >
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/british_insects/photos/album/2008021749/pic/list;jsessionid=406FA02B06C5CB
                > >
                > > Can anyone tell me what family it might be from.
                > >
                > > Regards
                > > Gordon
                > >
                > > --
                > > Gordon Jarvis
                > > Peasmarsh (VC14)
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                >
                >
                >



                --
                Gordon Jarvis
                Peasmarsh (VC14)


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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