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Coming soon to a site near you (Was Ant-Lions)

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  • Keith Edkins
    ... Perhaps this group could compile a watch list for new and spreading species (and encourage the relevant experts to tell us what to look for!) Here are some
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 1, 2002
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      --- In british_insects@y..., "Richard Clark" <rhclark@n...> wrote:
      > Something else to look out for next year - I'm getting quite a list
      > together - keep them coming.
      >
      > Richard C

      Perhaps this group could compile a watch list for new and spreading
      species (and encourage the relevant experts to tell us what to look
      for!)

      Here are some that I have heard about:

      Diptera:Syrphidae
      - the impressive hoverfly Volucella inanis, spreading north, I can
      confirm it has got at least as far as Cambridge
      http://www.gwydir.demon.co.uk/insects/volucellini.htm#inanis

      - the SERIOUSLY impressive hoverfly V.zonaria, following it, reported
      from Ipswich this year
      http://www.muenster.org/hornissenschutz/hschwfliege.htm

      Diptera:Tachinidae
      Ectophasia crassipennis, a parasit(oid)ic fly with orange flanked
      abdomen, reported from the Channel Islands, worht watching for on the
      south coast
      http://www.david.element.ukgateway.net/flies12miscellaneousflies1.htm

      Hymenoptera:Apidae
      Bombus hypnorum, new to Britain, reported in Southampton this year.
      "Looks very like a dark form of Bombus pascuorum EXCEPT that it has a
      snow white tail."
      http://www.nhm.ac.uk/science/news/bee.html

      Hymenoptera:Colletidae
      Colletes hederae, reported from coastal areas of Dorset and Devon. On
      Ivy flowers in September.
      http://www.bwars.com/frames/main/members/photos/mike_edwards/

      Keith Edkins
      Cambridge VC29
    • Paul Talbot
      Hi Keith/all Thanks for the links and suggestions. The problem with moths is that its almost impossible to suggest species people are likely to come across (in
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 1, 2002
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        Hi Keith/all
        Thanks for the links and suggestions.

        The problem with moths is that its almost impossible to suggest species people are likely to come across (in daylight hours) that are spreading their range. Many moth species these days are found miles further away than their usually accepted range. This is more a case perhaps of new recorders going out and looking for them rather than species itself expanding its range? Its also difficult unless you happen to run an MV light to find many of the macro moth species, very few will fly during the day unless disturbed.


        Another problem is that many of the adventive micro moths (which tend to be more active in daylight)are very small and need careful examination to determine the species, so are unlikely to be spotted and recognised by general entomologists.Having said all that there are several species that are worth watching out for next year.



        Light Brown Apple Moth- Epiphyas postvittana

        This species is spreading rapidly through the UK after first being recorded in Cornwall in the 1930's. It is now reaching almost pest proportions in some parts of the UK and can be seen in most months of the year in southern counties.

        Firethorn Leaf Miner -Phyllonorycter leucographella

        This is one of the leaf mining species and can be found most months of the year as a leaf mine. It mines Firethorn (pyracantha) bushes (often planted in formal settings such as carparks and public parks) and the mine is very easy to recognise. The adult needs a specialist to check it but the mine is very distinctive and easy to spot.

        Horse chestnut leaf-miner Cameraria ohridella

        This is a pest species spreading through Europe and unlike most leaf miners this one actually harms the tree as it occurs in huge numbers. This one even has its own website at http://www.cameraria.de/index_e.php
        I think its only been found in London so far in the UK but it is likely to spread rapidly.

        The first two species can be found on Ian Kimbers UK Moths website http://www.ukmoths.force9.co.uk/
        Go to "moth search" on the homepage and type in 998 this will bring up the E.postvittana page; 332a will bring up Firethorn Leaf Miner.

        There are many more "leaf mining" micro moths (and other orders) to look out for throughout the year before winter strips the trees of leaves. Its a fascinating way of recording many species as one does not need much in the way of equipment. I spend many sessions with simply a notebook, hand-lens and a few plastic bags to take leaves home in. Its also far easier to recognise many of the moth species from the mines than the adults which tend to look very similar! The mines tend to be distinctive for most species and records are accepted simply from finding these mines. Of the 100 or more leaf mining moth species I have recorded only about 20 have been seen as adults in the wild!

        If anyone wants a few tips on starting "mining" they can mail me offline or if people are interested I can perhaps post a few tips on the group page? It is a very good method for discovering all sorts of species Moths, Sawflies, Diptera, Coleoptera, etc.......but beware its very, very addictive once you start!

        Paul Talbot in VC 63







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Paul Mabbott
        I think that, basically, any species that currently has a southerly, especially south-eastern, distribution may be expected to travel north and west with
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 1, 2002
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          I think that, basically, any species that currently has a southerly,
          especially south-eastern, distribution may be expected to travel north and
          west with continued climate change. So nothing should be a surprise in the
          Midlands (of England) but there may be jumps further afield.
          Two obvious (and easy) beetles to look for are the Bryony Ladybird
          (Epilachna argus) which is all red (including forebody) except for twelve
          black elytral spots (two pairs of which may become confluent on the
          suture) - it is currently found in Surrey and Middlesex only on white bryony
          but may spread to other cucurbits.
          The Rosemary beetle (Chrysolina americana) is a large, domed, multicoloured
          metallic leaf beetle currently found in Surrey and London mostly on lavender
          but also on other labiates. It is likely to follow the trail of the Lily
          beetle (Lilioceris lilii) across the country. These, and many other
          interesting beetles are pictured on the British beetles web-site
          www.coleopterist.org.uk
          Some other small, atypical ladybirds are either spreading or have been
          undetected but these are not instantly recognisable!
          As well as spread of resident or colonised species, we should look out for
          common European species which, apparently, have not yet made it to Britain.
          Some obvious ones are the spotless all-red ladybird Cynegetis impunctata:
          much like the 24-spot ladybird Subcoccinella vigintiquattuorpunctata and
          similarly likely to be present in grass (NB: there is actually a rare
          spotless variant of the 24-spot so finds will need confirming). Amongst
          arboreal ladybirds there are several brown/orange/yellow species with white
          spots that might come across the Channel (Vibidia, Calvia &c species) and
          which might be confused with Cream-spot, Orange and other ladybirds: check
          spot numbers carefully as a starting point!
          There are plenty of other beetles from other Families which are also
          extending their range.
          Cheers, Paul


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Paul Talbot" <paulinvc63@...>
          To: <british_insects@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, December 01, 2002 2:19 PM
          Subject: Re: [british_insects] Coming soon to a site near you (Was
          Ant-Lions)


          > Hi Keith/all
          > Thanks for the links and suggestions.
          > The problem with moths is that its almost impossible to suggest species
          people are likely to come across (in daylight hours) that are spreading
          their range. Many moth species these days are found miles further away than
          their usually accepted range. This is more a case perhaps of new recorders
          going out and looking for them rather than species itself expanding its
          range? Its also difficult unless you happen to run an MV light to find many
          of the macro moth species, very few will fly during the day unless
          disturbed.
          > Another problem is that many of the adventive micro moths (which tend to
          be more active in daylight)are very small and need careful examination to
          determine the species, so are unlikely to be spotted and recognised by
          general entomologists.Having said all that there are several species that
          are worth watching out for next year.

          > Light Brown Apple Moth- Epiphyas postvittana
          >
          > This species is spreading rapidly through the UK after first being
          recorded in Cornwall in the 1930's. It is now reaching almost pest
          proportions in some parts of the UK and can be seen in most months of the
          year in southern counties.
          >
          > Firethorn Leaf Miner -Phyllonorycter leucographella
          >
          > This is one of the leaf mining species and can be found most months of the
          year as a leaf mine. It mines Firethorn (pyracantha) bushes (often planted
          in formal settings such as carparks and public parks) and the mine is very
          easy to recognise. The adult needs a specialist to check it but the mine is
          very distinctive and easy to spot.
          >
          > Horse chestnut leaf-miner Cameraria ohridella
          >
          > This is a pest species spreading through Europe and unlike most leaf
          miners this one actually harms the tree as it occurs in huge numbers. This
          one even has its own website at http://www.cameraria.de/index_e.php
          > I think its only been found in London so far in the UK but it is likely to
          spread rapidly.
          >
          > The first two species can be found on Ian Kimbers UK Moths website
          http://www.ukmoths.force9.co.uk/
          > Go to "moth search" on the homepage and type in 998 this will bring up the
          E.postvittana page; 332a will bring up Firethorn Leaf Miner.
          >
          > There are many more "leaf mining" micro moths (and other orders) to look
          out for throughout the year before winter strips the trees of leaves. Its a
          fascinating way of recording many species as one does not need much in the
          way of equipment. I spend many sessions with simply a notebook, hand-lens
          and a few plastic bags to take leaves home in. Its also far easier to
          recognise many of the moth species from the mines than the adults which tend
          to look very similar! The mines tend to be distinctive for most species and
          records are accepted simply from finding these mines. Of the 100 or more
          leaf mining moth species I have recorded only about 20 have been seen as
          adults in the wild!
          >
          > If anyone wants a few tips on starting "mining" they can mail me offline
          or if people are interested I can perhaps post a few tips on the group page?
          It is a very good method for discovering all sorts of species Moths,
          Sawflies, Diptera, Coleoptera, etc.......but beware its very, very addictive
          once you start!
          >
          > Paul Talbot in VC 63
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
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