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Wasp or bee ID

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  • brian901715
    Hi there. I would be grateful if somebody could take a look at the pics on this page please: http://thenaturalstone.blogspot.com/2005/05/bank-holiday-bugs.html
    Message 1 of 5 , May 2, 2005
      Hi there. I would be grateful if somebody could take a look at the pics on this page please:
      http://thenaturalstone.blogspot.com/2005/05/bank-holiday-bugs.html

      I'd like confirmation of the hoverfly and also a guide to where to look for the wasp or wasp-like bee in the last pic.

      Many thanks for any assistance.

      Brian Stone
      Elton, NW Cambs
    • Philippe Moniotte
      The bee (it is a bee) belongs to the genus Nomada. Those are parasitic bees. Their host is usually a species of Andrena (mining bees). There are many
      Message 2 of 5 , May 2, 2005
        The bee (it is a bee) belongs to the genus Nomada. Those are parasitic bees.
        Their host is usually a species of Andrena (mining bees). There are many
        look-alike species of Nomada, and it is probably impossible to ID from a
        photo to the species level.

        Philippe
        http://users.skynet.be/fa213618

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "brian901715" <brianhstone@...>
        To: <british_insects@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, May 02, 2005 6:24 PM
        Subject: [british_insects] Wasp or bee ID


        > Hi there. I would be grateful if somebody could take a look at the pics on
        this page please:
        > http://thenaturalstone.blogspot.com/2005/05/bank-holiday-bugs.html
        >
        > I'd like confirmation of the hoverfly and also a guide to where to look
        for the wasp or wasp-like bee in the last pic.
        >
        > Many thanks for any assistance.
        >
        > Brian Stone
        > Elton, NW Cambs
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • brian901715
        ... Many thanks. I guessed it might be a Nomada bee. Brian
        Message 3 of 5 , May 2, 2005
          --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, "Philippe Moniotte" <philippe.moniotte@s...> wrote:
          > The bee (it is a bee) belongs to the genus Nomada. Those are parasitic bees.
          > Their host is usually a species of Andrena (mining bees). There are many
          > look-alike species of Nomada, and it is probably impossible to ID from a
          > photo to the species level.
          >

          Many thanks. I guessed it might be a Nomada bee.

          Brian
        • British Marine Life Study Society
          ... Hello, But surely a Nomada shortlist could be drawn up? I am seeing bees or wasps with the same distinctive black and yellow abdomens skulking around
          Message 4 of 5 , May 2, 2005
            --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, "Philippe Moniotte"
            <philippe.moniotte@s...> wrote:
            > The bee (it is a bee) belongs to the genus Nomada. Those are parasitic
            > bees.
            > Their host is usually a species of Andrena (mining bees). There are many
            > look-alike species of Nomada, and it is probably impossible to ID from a
            > photo to the species level.
            >


            Hello,

            But surely a Nomada shortlist could be drawn up?

            I am seeing bees or wasps with the same distinctive black and yellow
            abdomens skulking around mainly the entrances to rabbit burrows. I could not
            get a photograph though. I thought these were more likely to be digger
            wasps. Are they around now?

            This might be a longlist though!

            Cheers

            Andy Horton
            glaucus@...
            Adur Valley Nature Notes
            http://www.glaucus.org.uk/Adur2005.html
            Adur Valley Nature Notes: May 2005
            http://www.glaucus.org.uk/May2005.html
            ><< ( ( ( ' >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Philippe Moniotte
            ... parasitic ... are many ... ID from a ... yellow ... could not ... digger ... Yes indeed, but one might argue about the use of it, since it would remain
            Message 5 of 5 , May 3, 2005
              --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, "British Marine Life Study
              Society" <Glaucus@h...> wrote:
              > --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, "Philippe Moniotte"
              > <philippe.moniotte@s...> wrote:
              > > The bee (it is a bee) belongs to the genus Nomada. Those are
              parasitic
              > > bees.
              > > Their host is usually a species of Andrena (mining bees). There
              are many
              > > look-alike species of Nomada, and it is probably impossible to
              ID from a
              > > photo to the species level.
              > >
              >
              >
              > Hello,
              >
              > But surely a Nomada shortlist could be drawn up?
              >
              > I am seeing bees or wasps with the same distinctive black and
              yellow
              > abdomens skulking around mainly the entrances to rabbit burrows. I
              could not
              > get a photograph though. I thought these were more likely to be
              digger
              > wasps. Are they around now?
              >
              > This might be a longlist though!
              >
              > Cheers
              >
              > Andy Horton

              Yes indeed, but one might argue about the use of it, since it would
              remain highly tentative and would fail to provide any further
              information, as the biology of all Nomada is so similar. Short of
              capturing a specimen for specialist determination, the best way
              would be to ascertain what the host is, but that would require a
              field study, I guess.
              In my area, the most abundant right now, that looks like it COULD be
              this one, is N. ruficornis, whose host is Andrena haemorrhoa...

              Philippe
              http://users.skynet.be/fa213618
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