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RE: [british_insects] Anyone know this Cycadellid?

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  • Hans Arentsen
    Dear Alan, As far as I can see my guess would be a Cercopidae. However I haven t found the exact species in the books I have. If you ever take pictures of
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 1, 2004
      Dear Alan,

      As far as I can see my guess would be a Cercopidae. However I haven't found
      the exact species in the books I have. If you ever take pictures of Cicadas
      again try to make one of the side as well. The patterns on the wings are
      sometimes conclusive.

      with kind regards,

      Hans Arentsen


      >From: "tipula_maxima" <alan_hadley@...>
      >Reply-To: british_insects@yahoogroups.com
      >To: british_insects@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [british_insects] Anyone know this Cycadellid?
      >Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 21:24:53 -0000
      >
      >I'm trying to name this insect captured in Sheffield this summer,
      >kept in the freezer and photographed today, can anyone help.
      >
      >http://www.hadleyweb.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/Cicadellidae/2/cicadellidae_
      >2.htm
      >
      >Alan Hadley
      >


      Hans Arentsen
      url: http://www.gardensafari.net
      e-mail: hans@...

      _________________________________________________________________
      MSN Zoeken helpt je om de gekste dingen te vinden! http://search.msn.nl
    • tipula_maxima
      Thank s Hans, I have added another picture after those already posted it shows the forewing and a hind leg. I tried to remove a hind wing, using a couple of
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 1, 2004
        Thank's Hans,

        I have added another picture after those already posted it shows the
        forewing and a hind leg. I tried to remove a hind wing, using a
        couple of needles, but it got torn badly, I shall have to practice
        some more, I don't know how they manage with even more delicate
        structures!

        You can see the series of spines running down the tibia on this leg
        which I beleive makes this a member of the Cicadellidae.

        --- In british_insects@yahoogroups.com, "Hans Arentsen"
        <arentsen@h...> wrote:
        > Dear Alan,
        >
        > As far as I can see my guess would be a Cercopidae. However I
        haven't found
        > the exact species in the books I have. If you ever take pictures of
        Cicadas
        > again try to make one of the side as well. The patterns on the
        wings are
        > sometimes conclusive.
        >
        > with kind regards,
        >
        > Hans Arentsen
        >
        >
        > >From: "tipula_maxima" <alan_hadley@b...>
        > >Reply-To: british_insects@yahoogroups.com
        > >To: british_insects@yahoogroups.com
        > >Subject: [british_insects] Anyone know this Cycadellid?
        > >Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2003 21:24:53 -0000
        > >
        > >I'm trying to name this insect captured in Sheffield this summer,
        > >kept in the freezer and photographed today, can anyone help.
        > >
        >
        http://www.hadleyweb.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/Cicadellidae/2/cicadellidae_
        2.htm

        Sorry about the long URL I don't know how to make them work properly
        > >
        > >Alan Hadley
        > >
        >
        >
        > Hans Arentsen
        > url: http://www.gardensafari.net
        > e-mail: hans@g...
        >
        > _________________________________________________________________
        > MSN Zoeken helpt je om de gekste dingen te vinden!
        http://search.msn.nl
      • Storey, M.W.
        ... Tip for insect detection. The professionals use tungsten wire sharpened in molten sodium nitrite (the two react to leave an incredibly sharp point). For
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 5, 2004
          tipula_maxima wrote:
          >I tried to remove a hind wing, using a
          > couple of needles, but it got torn badly,

          Tip for insect detection.
          The professionals use tungsten wire sharpened in molten
          sodium nitrite (the two react to leave an incredibly sharp point).
          For the rest of us:
          (If you're under 18 or clumsy, get somebody else to do this.)
          AT YOUR OWN RISK!
          Take an ordinary safety razor blade and a pair of strong scissors.
          Cut the 4 corners off (you want these) by cutting
          from just before the mid-point of the end to just before
          the mid-point of the side. (Obviously: take care!!)
          Often the point will curve upwards slightly, which you can
          straighten out with forceps, but it's often useful to leave it.
          Cover the blunt edge will Sellotape.
          This gives you 4 very sharp (cheap & disposable) knives.
          You can hold them in your fingers or in forceps.
          To remove a wing, gently saw thru the body where it is attached.
          Easier done under a dissecting microscope.
          I've done Drosophila this way.
          eg; http://www.bioimages.org.uk/HTML/P178043.HTM
          HTH
          Malcolm Storey
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