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Re: How religion is destroying America

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  • Andrew Crystall
    ... And paranoia is seeing connections which don t exist in everything. AndrewC Dawn Falcon _______________________________________________
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 2, 2006
      On 2 Oct 2006 at 22:21, William T Goodall wrote:

      >
      > On 2 Oct 2006, at 10:08PM, Deborah Harrell wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > William.
      > > 1. Stop lumping oranges and offal together; it makes
      > > one suspect that you have no sense of smell.
      > >
      >
      > Genius is seeing the similarities in things that other people think
      > are unrelated :-)

      And paranoia is seeing connections which don't exist in everything.

      AndrewC
      Dawn Falcon

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    • William T Goodall
      ... They say there s a thin line between genius and madness :-) Patterns Maru -- William T Goodall Mail : wtg@wtgab.demon.co.uk Web :
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 2, 2006
        On 2 Oct 2006, at 11:09PM, Andrew Crystall wrote:

        > On 2 Oct 2006 at 22:21, William T Goodall wrote:
        >
        >>
        >> On 2 Oct 2006, at 10:08PM, Deborah Harrell wrote:
        >>
        >>>
        >>> William.
        >>> 1. Stop lumping oranges and offal together; it makes
        >>> one suspect that you have no sense of smell.
        >>>
        >>
        >> Genius is seeing the similarities in things that other people think
        >> are unrelated :-)
        >
        > And paranoia is seeing connections which don't exist in everything.

        They say there's a thin line between genius and madness :-)

        Patterns Maru
        --
        William T Goodall
        Mail : wtg@...
        Web : http://www.wtgab.demon.co.uk
        Blog : http://radio.weblogs.com/0111221/

        "The three chief virtues of a programmer are: Laziness, Impatience
        and Hubris" - Larry Wall


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      • Ronn!Blankenship
        ... Or simply that liberals haven t evolved as far from their anthropoid ancestors as conservatives have . . . Ook Maru -- Ronn! :)
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 2, 2006
          At 03:47 PM Monday 10/2/2006, William T Goodall wrote:
          >I read this article recently
          >
          >http://tinyurl.com/eegfk
          >
          >The first paragraph contains the interesting bit which I quote:
          >
          >"According to a 2005 Pew Research Center poll, 70 percent of
          >evangelical Christians believe that living beings have always existed
          >in their present form, compared with 32 percent of Protestants and 31
          >percent of Catholics. Politically, 60 percent of Republicans are
          >creationists, whereas only 11 percent accept evolution, compared with
          >29 percent of Democrats who are creationists and 44 percent who
          >accept evolution. A 2005 Harris Poll found that 63 percent of
          >liberals but only 37 percent of conservatives believe that humans and
          >apes have a common ancestry. What these figures confirm for us is
          >that there are religious and political reasons for rejecting
          >evolution. "


          Or simply that liberals haven't evolved as far from their anthropoid
          ancestors as conservatives have . . .

          Ook Maru


          -- Ronn! :)



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        • Dave Land
          ... Which is why it s so hard to know when one crosses it. Dave _______________________________________________ http://www.mccmedia.com/mailman/listinfo/brin-l
          Message 4 of 12 , Oct 2, 2006
            On Oct 2, 2006, at 3:40 PM, William T Goodall wrote:

            > On 2 Oct 2006, at 11:09PM, Andrew Crystall wrote:
            >
            >> On 2 Oct 2006 at 22:21, William T Goodall wrote:
            >>
            >>> On 2 Oct 2006, at 10:08PM, Deborah Harrell wrote:
            >>>
            >>>> William.
            >>>> 1. Stop lumping oranges and offal together; it makes
            >>>> one suspect that you have no sense of smell.
            >>>
            >>> Genius is seeing the similarities in things that other
            >>> people think are unrelated :-)
            >>
            >> And paranoia is seeing connections which don't exist in
            >> everything.
            >
            > They say there's a thin line between genius and madness :-)

            Which is why it's so hard to know when one crosses it.

            Dave
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          • Ronn!Blankenship
            ... And some of us love to walk the line . . . -- Ronn! :) _______________________________________________ http://www.mccmedia.com/mailman/listinfo/brin-l
            Message 5 of 12 , Oct 2, 2006
              At 05:40 PM Monday 10/2/2006, William T Goodall wrote:

              >On 2 Oct 2006, at 11:09PM, Andrew Crystall wrote:
              >
              >>On 2 Oct 2006 at 22:21, William T Goodall wrote:
              >>
              >>>
              >>>On 2 Oct 2006, at 10:08PM, Deborah Harrell wrote:
              >>>
              >>>>
              >>>>William.
              >>>>1. Stop lumping oranges and offal together; it makes
              >>>>one suspect that you have no sense of smell.
              >>>
              >>>Genius is seeing the similarities in things that other people think
              >>>are unrelated :-)
              >>
              >>And paranoia is seeing connections which don't exist in everything.
              >
              >They say there's a thin line between genius and madness :-)


              And some of us love to walk the line . . .


              -- Ronn! :)



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            • Deborah Harrell
              ... Hmm. A) Both words are English and begin with O. B) Both are organic in origin (as opposed to mineral). C) Both can be eaten, however: i. Oranges are
              Message 6 of 12 , Oct 3, 2006
                > William T Goodall <wtg@...> wrote:
                > > On 2 Oct 2006, at 10:08PM, Deborah Harrell wrote:

                > > 1. Stop lumping oranges and offal together; it
                > makes
                > > one suspect that you have no sense of smell.

                > Genius is seeing the similarities in things that
                > other people think are unrelated :-)

                Hmm.
                A) Both words are English and begin with "O."
                B) Both are organic in origin (as opposed to mineral).
                C) Both can be eaten, however:
                i. Oranges are part of a healthy, nutritious diet.
                ii. Offal is not - unless you are a vulture.

                Debbi
                Siflay And Flayrah Maru

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              • Charlie Bell
                ... Yes it is. But then I was born in Britain, where haggis, tripe, black pudding and liver hotpot are regulars on the menu. Nothing wrong with offal in
                Message 7 of 12 , Oct 3, 2006
                  On 04/10/2006, at 9:16 AM, Deborah Harrell wrote:


                  > C) Both can be eaten, however:
                  > i. Oranges are part of a healthy, nutritious diet.
                  > ii. Offal is not - unless you are a vulture.

                  Yes it is. But then I was born in Britain, where haggis, tripe, black
                  pudding and liver hotpot are regulars on the menu.

                  Nothing wrong with offal in moderation. Liver is an excellent source
                  of vitamin A and iron. (Just don't eat too much, acute
                  hypervitaminosis is a nasty way to go).

                  Charlle
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                • Deborah Harrell
                  ... And we have another different interpretation of a word from GB to US; the first definition below implies edibility, but the ones after it do not.
                  Message 8 of 12 , Oct 3, 2006
                    > Charlie Bell <charlie@...> wrote:
                    > On 04/10/2006, at 9:16 AM, Deborah Harrell wrote:

                    > > C) Both can be eaten, however:
                    > > i. Oranges are part of a healthy, nutritious
                    > diet.
                    > > ii. Offal is not - unless you are a vulture.

                    > Yes it is. But then I was born in Britain, where
                    > haggis, tripe, black
                    > pudding and liver hotpot are regulars on the menu.

                    And we have another different interpretation of a word
                    from GB to US; the first definition below implies
                    edibility, but the ones after it do not.

                    http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=offal
                    Main Entry: of·fal
                    Pronunciation: 'o-f&l, 'ä-
                    Function: noun
                    Etymology: Middle English, from of off + fall
                    1 : the waste or by-product of a process: as a :
                    trimmings of a hide b : the by-products of milling
                    used especially for stock feeds c : the viscera and
                    trimmings of a butchered animal removed in dressing:
                    VARIETY MEAT
                    2 : RUBBISH

                    http://www.brainydictionary.com/words/of/offal195880.html
                    Offal
                    1. The rejected or waste parts of a butchered animal.
                    2. A dead body; carrion.
                    3. That which is thrown away as worthless or unfit for
                    use; refuse; rubbish.

                    http://www.brainydictionary.com/words/ga/garbage168166.html
                    Garbage
                    1. Offal, as the bowels of an animal or fish; refuse
                    animal or vegetable matter from a kitchen; hence,
                    anything worthless, disgusting, or loathsome.
                    2. To strip of the bowels; to clean.

                    >From the American Heritage Dictionary:
                    http://www.answers.com/main/ntq-tname-offal-fts_start-
                    1) Waste parts, especially of a butchered animal.
                    2) Refuse; rubbish.

                    > Nothing wrong with offal in moderation. Liver is an
                    > excellent source
                    > of vitamin A and iron. (Just don't eat too much,
                    > acute hypervitaminosis is a nasty way to go).

                    <grin> _We_ call liver and organ meats etc. "variety
                    meats," not wanting to be accused of eating waste
                    parts!

                    Debbi
                    Americish Instead Of English Maru ;)

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                  • Charlie Bell
                    ... Aha. In Cyprus, I used to get liver and kidneys free from the butcher, cause hardly anyone eats them. Lamb s kidneys... yum.... :-D Right, I m off to get
                    Message 9 of 12 , Oct 3, 2006
                      On 04/10/2006, at 10:03 AM, Deborah Harrell wrote:

                      >
                      >> Yes it is. But then I was born in Britain, where
                      >> haggis, tripe, black
                      >> pudding and liver hotpot are regulars on the menu.
                      >
                      > And we have another different interpretation of a word
                      > from GB to US; the first definition below implies
                      > edibility, but the ones after it do not.

                      Aha.

                      In Cyprus, I used to get liver and kidneys free from the butcher,
                      'cause hardly anyone eats them. Lamb's kidneys... yum.... :-D

                      Right, I'm off to get a glass of squash and bum a fag... ;-)

                      Charlie
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