Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [brazosastro] More observing report

Expand Messages
  • vgaudette@suddenlink.net
    Dumb question from the newbie: Can you see all 103 Messier objects with good binoculars in dark skies, or will I need a telescope to view some of them? I enjoy
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 19, 2008
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Dumb question from the newbie:
      Can you see all 103 Messier objects with good binoculars in dark skies, or will I need a telescope to view some of them? I enjoy reading the reports...thanks for sharing them.
      Thanks,
      Vicki

      ---- wsager02 <wsager@...> wrote:
      > BVAC:
      >
      > Since Anjal asked me to fill in my part of the observing report, I
      > will do so. It was a nice night with a clear sky and reasonable
      > seeing; although, as Anjal points out, the dew quickly became a
      > problem. It makes me think that if I am going to do a Messier
      > marathon in the spring, I better have some anti-dew strategies.
      >
      > My goal for the evening was to pick off some Messier objects. I am
      > trying to go through the Messier catalog with binoculars to see how
      > many I can see. I am using an old pair of 7x50 Leitz binoculars
      > (handheld) and a pair of 20x88 semi-APO binoculars on an alt-az mount.
      > The latter is like having two small refractors, so it pulls in a lot
      > more light than the standard handheld binos. As for recording, my
      > notes are pretty simple; I just record that I saw the object, how I
      > found it, and a few notes about what it looks like. And I am trying
      > to note how many I can see with the 7x50s and the 20x88s. Last night,
      > my 7x50s were completely dewed over after an hour, so most of my
      > observations were with the 20x88s, which have dew caps and did not dew up.
      >
      > So I started the evening exploring old favorites around Sagittarius
      > while it got completely dark. You could spend a whole night in that
      > one part of the sky. I picked out M6, M7, M8, M20 (Lagoon Neb), M21,
      > up to M24 (the star cloud), and then up to M16, M17, M18. And I
      > backtracked down to globulars M19 and M62, which were going down
      > behind the trees.
      >
      > After that tune up, I started picking off some Messier objects that I
      > didn't think I had hit already. Some were up to the north, where the
      > College Station light pollution interferes. I saw M103, an
      > unimpressive open cluster in Cassiopeia and then got M52, another open
      > cluster that has a little more going for it. I tried hard to see the
      > planetary nebula M76 in Perseus, but even though I tracked down guide
      > stars bracketing it's position, I could not make it out. Maybe a
      > darker sky would help. A relatively easy object was M34, a large open
      > cluster in Perseus. Then I tried M74, a galaxy not too far away in
      > Pisces. Anjal thought that he could just make it out, but I couldn't
      > convince myself that I saw it. Another one to try from really dark skies.
      >
      > Anjal and I both checked out M45 (Pleiades) and the Great Andromeda
      > Galaxy, comparing views in his 5" APO and my twin 3.5" binos. The
      > Pleiades were spectacular in these low power scopes, even with light
      > pollution, and we could see a faint haze of nebulosity around the
      > principal stars. Andromeda is also a fine set of objects in these
      > small scopes. The great galaxy was an elongated, elliptical, hazy
      > zone with a pronounced central condensation. M32 showed up looking
      > like a star, but on close inspection appears too "fuzzy" to be a star.
      > And M110, is a faint, glowing blob a couple of degrees away.
      >
      > As Anjal was picking up, I finished off with M39 in the Milky Way
      > north of Deneb in Cygnus. It was a challenging star hop from Deneb
      > using several small star groupings as stepping stones. My notes say
      > that M52 in Cassiopeia was also a challenging star hop, beginning from
      > epsilon Cepheus. Both of these are challenging because the are in the
      > Milky Way but not near bright stars, so you have to take a long series
      > of hops using dim stars to get there.
      >
      > And finally, to amplify what Anjal said about observation notes, it's
      > fun to look back and see where and when you saw stuff. It's also
      > necessary if you have a goal like seeing all of the Messier objects.
      > So I also have a sheet with all of the M-numbers and I put a check
      > mark next to the ones that I picked off on a given night - and it
      > gives a nice sense of accomplishment.
      >
      > Clear Skies,
      > Will
      >
    • anjal_sharma@yahoo.com
      Vicki, It depends....on the binocular aperture, the level of light pollution you re dealing with and transparency.  I think once you get to about 80mm or so
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 19, 2008
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Vicki,

        It depends....on the binocular aperture, the level of light pollution you're dealing with and transparency.  I think once you get to about 80mm or so of binocular or scope aperture you should be able to pick out most of the Messier objects provided you have reasonably dark skies and good transparency. 

        Anjal.

        --- On Sun, 10/19/08, vgaudette@... <vgaudette@...> wrote:
        From: vgaudette@... <vgaudette@...>
        Subject: Re: [brazosastro] More observing report
        To: brazosastro@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: "wsager02" <wsager@...>
        Date: Sunday, October 19, 2008, 3:49 PM

        Dumb question from the newbie:
        Can you see all 103 Messier objects with good binoculars in dark skies, or will I need a telescope to view some of them? I enjoy reading the reports...thanks for sharing them.
        Thanks,
        Vicki

        ---- wsager02 <wsager@ocean. tamu.edu> wrote:
        > BVAC:
        >
        > Since Anjal asked me to fill in my part of the observing report, I
        > will do so. It was a nice night with a clear sky and reasonable
        > seeing; although, as Anjal points out, the dew quickly became a
        > problem. It makes me think that if I am going to do a Messier
        > marathon in the spring, I better have some anti-dew strategies.
        >
        > My goal for the evening was to pick off some Messier objects. I am
        > trying to go through the Messier catalog with binoculars to see how
        > many I can see. I am using an old pair of 7x50 Leitz binoculars
        > (handheld) and a pair of 20x88 semi-APO binoculars on an alt-az mount.
        > The latter is like having two small refractors, so it pulls in a lot
        > more light than the standard handheld binos. As for recording, my
        > notes are pretty simple; I just record that I saw the object, how I
        > found it, and a few notes about what it looks like. And I am trying
        > to note how many I can see with the 7x50s and the 20x88s. Last night,
        > my 7x50s were completely dewed over after an hour, so most of my
        > observations were with the 20x88s, which have dew caps and did not dew up.
        >
        > So I started the evening exploring old favorites around Sagittarius
        > while it got completely dark. You could spend a whole night in that
        > one part of the sky. I picked out M6, M7, M8, M20 (Lagoon Neb), M21,
        > up to M24 (the star cloud), and then up to M16, M17, M18. And I
        > backtracked down to globulars M19 and M62, which were going down
        > behind the trees.
        >
        > After that tune up, I started picking off some Messier objects that I
        > didn't think I had hit already. Some were up to the north, where the
        > College Station light pollution interferes. I saw M103, an
        > unimpressive open cluster in Cassiopeia and then got M52, another open
        > cluster that has a little more going for it. I tried hard to see the
        > planetary nebula M76 in Perseus, but even though I tracked down guide
        > stars bracketing it's position, I could not make it out. Maybe a
        > darker sky would help. A relatively easy object was M34, a large open
        > cluster in Perseus. Then I tried M74, a galaxy not too far away in
        > Pisces. Anjal thought that he could just make it out, but I couldn't
        > convince myself that I saw it. Another one to try from really dark skies.
        >
        > Anjal and I both checked out M45 (Pleiades) and the Great Andromeda
        > Galaxy, comparing views in his 5" APO and my twin 3.5" binos. The
        > Pleiades were spectacular in these low power scopes, even with light
        > pollution, and we could see a faint haze of nebulosity around the
        > principal stars. Andromeda is also a fine set of objects in these
        > small scopes. The great galaxy was an elongated, elliptical, hazy
        > zone with a pronounced central condensation. M32 showed up looking
        > like a star, but on close inspection appears too "fuzzy" to be a star.
        > And M110, is a faint, glowing blob a couple of degrees away.
        >
        > As Anjal was picking up, I finished off with M39 in the Milky Way
        > north of Deneb in Cygnus. It was a challenging star hop from Deneb
        > using several small star groupings as stepping stones. My notes say
        > that M52 in Cassiopeia was also a challenging star hop, beginning from
        > epsilon Cepheus. Both of these are challenging because the are in the
        > Milky Way but not near bright stars, so you have to take a long series
        > of hops using dim stars to get there.
        >
        > And finally, to amplify what Anjal said about observation notes, it's
        > fun to look back and see where and when you saw stuff. It's also
        > necessary if you have a goal like seeing all of the Messier objects.
        > So I also have a sheet with all of the M-numbers and I put a check
        > mark next to the ones that I picked off on a given night - and it
        > gives a nice sense of accomplishment.
        >
        > Clear Skies,
        > Will
        >


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Don E. Bray
        Thanks for the report, sorry that I was not in town. Don ... *************************************** Don E. Bray Mail P. O. Box 10315, College Station, Texas
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 21, 2008
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks for the report, sorry that I was not in town.

          Don

          On 19 Oct 2008, at 2:10 PM, wsager02 wrote:

          BVAC:

          Since Anjal asked me to fill in my part of the observing report, I
          will do so. It was a nice night with a clear sky and reasonable
          seeing; although, as Anjal points out, the dew quickly became a
          problem. It makes me think that if I am going to do a Messier
          marathon in the spring, I better have some anti-dew strategies.

          My goal for the evening was to pick off some Messier objects. I am
          trying to go through the Messier catalog with binoculars to see how
          many I can see. I am using an old pair of 7x50 Leitz binoculars
          (handheld) and a pair of 20x88 semi-APO binoculars on an alt-az mount.
          The latter is like having two small refractors, so it pulls in a lot
          more light than the standard handheld binos. As for recording, my
          notes are pretty simple; I just record that I saw the object, how I
          found it, and a few notes about what it looks like. And I am trying
          to note how many I can see with the 7x50s and the 20x88s. Last night,
          my 7x50s were completely dewed over after an hour, so most of my
          observations were with the 20x88s, which have dew caps and did not dew up.

          So I started the evening exploring old favorites around Sagittarius
          while it got completely dark. You could spend a whole night in that
          one part of the sky. I picked out M6, M7, M8, M20 (Lagoon Neb), M21,
          up to M24 (the star cloud), and then up to M16, M17, M18. And I
          backtracked down to globulars M19 and M62, which were going down
          behind the trees.

          After that tune up, I started picking off some Messier objects that I
          didn't think I had hit already. Some were up to the north, where the
          College Station light pollution interferes. I saw M103, an
          unimpressive open cluster in Cassiopeia and then got M52, another open
          cluster that has a little more going for it. I tried hard to see the
          planetary nebula M76 in Perseus, but even though I tracked down guide
          stars bracketing it's position, I could not make it out. Maybe a
          darker sky would help. A relatively easy object was M34, a large open
          cluster in Perseus. Then I tried M74, a galaxy not too far away in
          Pisces. Anjal thought that he could just make it out, but I couldn't
          convince myself that I saw it. Another one to try from really dark skies.

          Anjal and I both checked out M45 (Pleiades) and the Great Andromeda
          Galaxy, comparing views in his 5" APO and my twin 3.5" binos. The
          Pleiades were spectacular in these low power scopes, even with light
          pollution, and we could see a faint haze of nebulosity around the
          principal stars. Andromeda is also a fine set of objects in these
          small scopes. The great galaxy was an elongated, elliptical, hazy
          zone with a pronounced central condensation. M32 showed up looking
          like a star, but on close inspection appears too "fuzzy" to be a star.
          And M110, is a faint, glowing blob a couple of degrees away. 

          As Anjal was picking up, I finished off with M39 in the Milky Way
          north of Deneb in Cygnus. It was a challenging star hop from Deneb
          using several small star groupings as stepping stones. My notes say
          that M52 in Cassiopeia was also a challenging star hop, beginning from
          epsilon Cepheus. Both of these are challenging because the are in the
          Milky Way but not near bright stars, so you have to take a long series
          of hops using dim stars to get there.

          And finally, to amplify what Anjal said about observation notes, it's
          fun to look back and see where and when you saw stuff. It's also
          necessary if you have a goal like seeing all of the Messier objects. 
          So I also have a sheet with all of the M-numbers and I put a check
          mark next to the ones that I picked off on a given night - and it
          gives a nice sense of accomplishment.

          Clear Skies,
          Will


          ***************************************
          Don E. Bray
          Mail P. O. Box 10315, College Station, Texas 77842-0315
          Ship 1601 Fontaine Street, College Station, Texas 77845-5612
          USA
          Office/Cellular 979-492-9534
          Fax 979-693-1620
          Res 979-693-1620
          Astronomy photos http://homepage.mac.com/debray1/PhotoAlbum22.html

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.