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Terms of Address

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  • timomomo
    A Brazilian woman told me that senhora is not really used (in Rio). Is there a common term of address to show respect (or to not be overly familiar) with
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 3, 2003
      A Brazilian woman told me that "senhora" is not really used (in
      Rio). Is there a common term of address to show respect (or to not
      be overly familiar) with someone (female) you don't know?
    • Renata
      timomomo wrote:A Brazilian woman told me that senhora is not really used (in Rio). Is there a common term of address to show
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 3, 2003
        timomomo <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:A Brazilian woman told me that "senhora" is not really used (in
        Rio). Is there a common term of address to show respect (or to not
        be overly familiar) with someone (female) you don't know?


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      • jeja69fun@yahoo.com
        From my many trips to Brasil, I would use the term Dona to show respect and not be too familiar. timomomo wrote:A Brazilian woman
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 3, 2003
          From my many trips to Brasil, I would use the term "Dona" to show respect and not be too familiar.

          timomomo <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:A Brazilian woman told me that "senhora" is not really used (in
          Rio). Is there a common term of address to show respect (or to not
          be overly familiar) with someone (female) you don't know?


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        • dio neu
          you can call senhora a lady after 50s IF you re on 20s...... normally you say VOCE but if you live in south brasil you say
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 3, 2003
            you can call ""senhora"" a lady after 50s IF you're on 20s......
            normally you say ""VOCE"" but if you live in south brasil you say ""TU"" for 20s or less .
            SENHORA is the rigth term but means "" old lady"" and noboddy like this, lol
            I'm a brazilian from south

            timomomo <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
            A Brazilian woman told me that "senhora" is not really used (in
            Rio). Is there a common term of address to show respect (or to not
            be overly familiar) with someone (female) you don't know?


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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Erik Baktai
            You respectfully address a Brazilian lady with Dona , followed by her first name. Portuguese or Brazilian women are not supposed to be called by Senhora and
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 5, 2003
              You respectfully address a Brazilian lady with "Dona", followed by her first name. Portuguese or Brazilian women are not supposed to be called by Senhora and their family names. "Dona" is not used without a first name. You may use "Senhora", but without any name, but usually use it only when talking to strangers.

              In case of a lady with a college or university degree, you address her with "Doutora" (Doctor), either with or without her Christian name, irrespectively whether she actually holds a doctor's degree or not. You can also address her with "Senora Doutora". In case of a lady with a college degree in engineering, you may address her with "Senhora Engenheira" (Engenheiro or Engenheira (female)means Engineer).

              As I am not a native speaker, I hope I gave you the right info but this is what I was told by a former Portuguese girl-friend.




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            • antonio_marmo
              ... nt in this respect.The difference between senhora (mrs.) and senhorita (miss) is that the = former applies to married women and the latter to single
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 27, 2003
                --- In brazilsjoint@yahoogroups.com, timomomo <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                > A Brazilian woman told me that "senhora" is not really used (in
                > Rio). Is there a common term of address to show respect (or to not
                > be overly familiar) with someone (female) you don't know?

                Well, in Brazilian society things are different and women are more consiste=
                nt
                in this respect.

                The difference between 'senhora' (mrs.) and 'senhorita' (miss) is that the =
                former
                applies to married women and the latter to single ones. But mind that usual=
                ly a
                woman only gets married after a certain age, so that using the term 'senhor=
                a'
                implies that she does not look young. So, unlike in some Countries, they fi=
                nd
                much more polite and elegant to hear the term 'senhorita' (miss). 'Senhora'=

                (mrs.) conversely may be interpeted as a sexist sarcasm, like 'hey grandma'=
                .
                So, in this respect,
                Brazlian women are more inteligent than feminists in many other Countries.
                Hahahahahahaha!

                But in Rio a rich woman is often called 'Madame' and young ladies are treat=
                ed
                just like 'você' (you). Both in Rio and in Lisbon, 'você' is something in b=
                etween
                'senhor'/ 'senhora' and 'tu' (you).
                The real intimate treatment in Rio is 'tu'. But mind that in other Brazilia=
                n States
                'você' may be the only intimate treatment.
              • Maria dOsala
                Hi Timomomo! Senhora is used if the lady is much older than you. But remember senhora also means she is a married woman. As an older Brazilian woman (60) I
                Message 7 of 11 , Jan 4, 2004
                  Hi Timomomo!

                  Senhora is used if the lady is much older than you. But remember
                  senhora also means she is a married woman. As an older Brazilian
                  woman (60) I find strange when people close to my age calls me
                  senhora (40 up), but don't mind younger people. It is also up to the
                  lady to tell you you can call her "você" (less formal and more
                  intimate).
                  Maria

                  --- In brazilsjoint@yahoogroups.com, timomomo <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                  > A Brazilian woman told me that "senhora" is not really used (in
                  > Rio). Is there a common term of address to show respect (or to not
                  > be overly familiar) with someone (female) you don't know?
                • Daniela
                  ... Senhora is used instead of you when you re addressing to a woman which is older than you (or you re showing respect). But, before her name (like Mrs.
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jan 28, 2004
                    --- In brazilsjoint@yahoogroups.com, timomomo <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                    > A Brazilian woman told me that "senhora" is not really used (in
                    > Rio). Is there a common term of address to show respect (or to not
                    > be overly familiar) with someone (female) you don't know?

                    "Senhora" is used instead of "you" when you're addressing to a woman
                    which is older than you (or you're showing respect). But, before her
                    name (like Mrs. Maria), you only will use "Senhora" (Sra. Maria) in
                    formal or writing Portuguese. "Dona" is more use (read Dona Maria) in
                    informal language.

                    Beijos
                    Daniela
                  • Daniela
                    Senhora is used instead of you when you talk with an older (or unknown) woman. In Rio and every other cities of Brazil. However, Senhora isn t like
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 1, 2004
                      "Senhora" is used instead of "you" when you talk with an older (or
                      unknown) woman. In Rio and every other cities of Brazil.
                      However, "Senhora" isn't like "Mistress", especially in informal
                      language, when you put "Dona".

                      Reading Portuguese: "Mrs. Mary" = "Sra. Mary".
                      Talking Portuguese: "Mrs. Mary" = "Dona Mary".

                      Beijos
                      Daniela
                    • Christiane
                      Yeah, senhora is like a ma am (madam) when alone, and means you when we say a senhora . Also Sra Maria when Mrs. Maria , but I think this Dona
                      Message 10 of 11 , Mar 4, 2004
                        Yeah, "senhora" is like a "ma'am" (madam) when alone, and means "you"
                        when we say "a senhora". Also "Sra Maria" when "Mrs. Maria", but I
                        think this "Dona Maria" is more when a housekeeper or a maid talks
                        with his/her female boss. I don't use "Dona" to talk with my mother's
                        friends neither to my teachers, for example.
                        Sometimes you'll hear from the women a "Senhora está no céu", in
                        jest, it means that just Holly Mary is a "Senhora" (está no céu = is
                        in heaven), and they're taking your treatment as you're saying
                        they're old. Then you should smile, correct and treat them as "você"
                        (you).
                        beijos,
                        c.

                        --- In brazilsjoint@yahoogroups.com, "Daniela" <danikrycek@y...>
                        wrote:
                        > --- In brazilsjoint@yahoogroups.com, timomomo <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                        > > A Brazilian woman told me that "senhora" is not really used (in
                        > > Rio). Is there a common term of address to show respect (or to
                        not
                        > > be overly familiar) with someone (female) you don't know?
                        >
                        > "Senhora" is used instead of "you" when you're addressing to a
                        woman
                        > which is older than you (or you're showing respect). But, before
                        her
                        > name (like Mrs. Maria), you only will use "Senhora" (Sra. Maria) in
                        > formal or writing Portuguese. "Dona" is more use (read Dona Maria)
                        in
                        > informal language.
                        >
                        > Beijos
                        > Daniela
                      • brenda marques
                        please join http://groups.yahoo.com/group/todosemvictoria ... Senhora is used instead of you when you re addressing to a woman which is older than you (or
                        Message 11 of 11 , Mar 10, 2004
                          please join
                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/todosemvictoria
                          Daniela <danikrycek@...> wrote:--- In brazilsjoint@yahoogroups.com, timomomo <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                          > A Brazilian woman told me that "senhora" is not really used (in
                          > Rio). Is there a common term of address to show respect (or to not
                          > be overly familiar) with someone (female) you don't know?

                          "Senhora" is used instead of "you" when you're addressing to a woman
                          which is older than you (or you're showing respect). But, before her
                          name (like Mrs. Maria), you only will use "Senhora" (Sra. Maria) in
                          formal or writing Portuguese. "Dona" is more use (read Dona Maria) in
                          informal language.

                          Beijos
                          Daniela




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