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From Suffolk to Scotland

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  • Jeff
    Further to the disussion as to possible explanations of the origins of the English version of the Bowes name in Ireland, I came across the case of a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 6, 2009
      Further to the disussion as to possible explanations of the origins
      of the English version of the 'Bowes' name in Ireland, I came across
      the case of a gentleman from the County of Suffolk, England, named as
      R.Bogas, a spelling virtally identical with the Old English/Saxon
      name for 'bow' and 'bend', who as part of the 17th Century Ulster
      Plantation was accorded 1000 acres in Cloncarn, County Fermanagh.

      Interesting to note that the family name 'Bogas' still exists in
      Suffolk, which was once part of the Kingdom of the Angles (6th to 9th
      Century) themselves related to the Saxons. Incredible to consider how
      this name somehow survived any modification and did not transform
      into 'Bow', 'Bowe' or 'Bowes'

      The name Bogue/Bogues/ Boyce is associated with County Fermanagh and
      may be partly explained by the example above, supported perhaps by
      the arrival of Scottish 'settlers' some of whom also may have carried
      the Bogue name, after the village in Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland.
      Although the name is not at all common amongst Scottish surnames,

      http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Bogue-family-history-sct.ashx?
      fn=&yr=1841

      Bowes too is not numerous

      http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Bowes-family-history-sct.ashx

      however Scottish 'settlement' during periods of Plantation could be
      another possible source of some non-Gaelic Bowes name into Ireland.

      Of course the Bogue name was also an Anglicised corruption of
      Buadhaigh and some 'Bogues' in Fermanagh may owe their name to that.
    • mhbowes11
      Good! Where did to find that? Is there a central source of names of those who came over as part of the plantation? This is good reason to include the name
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 6, 2009
        Good! Where did to find that? Is there a central source of names of those who came over
        as part of the plantation?

        This is good reason to include the name Bogas in our study, and to find some willing
        participants of that name in Suffolk!

        I assume you've seen this page: http://www.goireland.com/genealogy/family.htm?
        FamilyID=432 which has more re: Bogue, Boyce and other variants?

        Bogue (O) BOGUE BOWE BOYCE


        Bogue and Bowe are anglicized forms of the Gaelic Ó Buadhaigh, probably derived from
        the adjective buadhach, victorious. Bogue is usual in Co. Cork and Bowe in the midland
        counties. The sept was located in the Corca Laoidhe country (south-west Cork). The
        "census" of 1659 shows the extent to which the name was both numerous and scattered
        in the seventeenth century. In the returns of the principal Irish names, in addition to
        Buoige and O'Buoige in the part of Co. Cork, the "census" of 1659 gives: Buo, Co.
        Waterford (barony of Upperthird); Boe and O'Boe, Co. Kilkenny (baronies of Galmoy,
        Gowran and Crannagh) and Co. Wexford; Bowe and O'Bowe, Co. Leix. In the Tipperary
        Hearth Money Rolls of around the same date 40 families of Bowe are included in various
        parts of the county. In the Chancery Rolls for 1547 we find Thady Boee recorded as a
        cleric in the diocese of Limerick. In none of the records consulted does Co. Fermanagh
        appear, though nineteenth century birth registration returns indicate that Bogue is mainly
        found in that county; and the same authority shows that the principal location of Bowe is
        Co. Kilkenny. There were many other variants of the name in English besides those
        mentioned, e.g. Donough O'Bough, a Co. Cork witness in 1621; a Dermot O'Bowige, a
        Donough O'Boughaie and a Walter O'Boo show the variety of spelling used in the Fiants
        recording the names of men who received Elizabethan pardons. Ó Buadhaigh has also
        been anglicized Boyce, a surname fairly common in north-west Ulster (Donegal and
        Derry). Boyce, also an English name of Norman origin, is derived from bois, a wood, some
        of todays Irish Boyces are descended from English settlers: they appear as such at least as
        far back as the fourteenth century, when they were to be found both in Co. Meath and in
        Co. Limerick (at first under the name de Boys) down to the time of the Cromwellian
        settlement when Joyn Boyce, an "adventurer" obtained 360 acres in the barony of Iffa and
        Offa, Co. Tipperary, and Henry Boyse, a London tallow-chandler, and a large subscriber
        for lands. There is a Boystown in Co. Meath; and Boys of Gallgath, mentioned in the
        Meath muster of 1586 as one of the chief men of the barony of Deece, was also of Anglo-
        Norman stock. The Boyces of Donegal and Derry are for the most part of Gaelic-Irish
        origin. It is noteworthy, that Buie and Bwee, which are normally phonetic spellings of the
        adjective buidhe (yellow) are used in Donegal as synonyms of Boyce. Boy was the usual
        equivalent in sixteenth century English of buidhe as an epithet or agnomen, e.g. Sorley
        Boy. The use of Boy as an adjectival surname, comparable to Glass (glas) Reagh (riabhach)
        etc. has been noted in Counties Tipperary and Clare. A possible cause of confusion also
        lies in the fact that in the seventeenth century Boy was sometimes used as an abbreviated
        form of MacEvoy. Rev. Dr. John Boyce (1810-1864), the priest who made his name as a
        novelist in America, was born in Co. Donegal, as was his nephew Jerome Boyce, a poet of
        some merit. Another poet, Samuel Boyce (1708-1747) was a Dublin man. Sir Rupert
        Boyce (1863-1911), whose work in connexion with tropical medicine was noteworthy, was
        born in London of Irish parentage

        --- In bowesvariantsdna@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <bowes2000@...> wrote:
        >
        > Further to the disussion as to possible explanations of the origins
        > of the English version of the 'Bowes' name in Ireland, I came across
        > the case of a gentleman from the County of Suffolk, England, named as
        > R.Bogas, a spelling virtally identical with the Old English/Saxon
        > name for 'bow' and 'bend', who as part of the 17th Century Ulster
        > Plantation was accorded 1000 acres in Cloncarn, County Fermanagh.
        >
        > Interesting to note that the family name 'Bogas' still exists in
        > Suffolk, which was once part of the Kingdom of the Angles (6th to 9th
        > Century) themselves related to the Saxons. Incredible to consider how
        > this name somehow survived any modification and did not transform
        > into 'Bow', 'Bowe' or 'Bowes'
        >
        > The name Bogue/Bogues/ Boyce is associated with County Fermanagh and
        > may be partly explained by the example above, supported perhaps by
        > the arrival of Scottish 'settlers' some of whom also may have carried
        > the Bogue name, after the village in Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland.
        > Although the name is not at all common amongst Scottish surnames,
        >
        > http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Bogue-family-history-sct.ashx?
        > fn=&yr=1841
        >
        > Bowes too is not numerous
        >
        > http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Bowes-family-history-sct.ashx
        >
        > however Scottish 'settlement' during periods of Plantation could be
        > another possible source of some non-Gaelic Bowes name into Ireland.
        >
        > Of course the Bogue name was also an Anglicised corruption of
        > Buadhaigh and some 'Bogues' in Fermanagh may owe their name to that.
        >
      • mhbowes11
        ... The I1c Bogue in the Boggs project has a genealogy that takes him back to Scotland as a Boig/Bog. His website shows earliest ancestor William Bogue ABT
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 13, 2009
          --- In bowesgenealogy@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <bowes2000@...> wrote:
          >
          > The name Bogue/Bogues/ Boyce is associated with County Fermanagh and
          > may be partly explained by the example above [Bogas], supported perhaps by
          > the arrival of Scottish 'settlers' some of whom also may have carried
          > the Bogue name, after the village in Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland.
          > Although the name is not at all common amongst Scottish surnames.

          The I1c Bogue in the Boggs project has a genealogy that takes him back to Scotland as a
          Boig/Bog. His website shows earliest ancestor William Bogue ABT 1631 in Berwickshire,
          Scotland (is that near Kirkcudbrightshire?). Although they appeared to emigrate directly to
          US, they could've had a branch go down to Ireland.

          http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mdswan1&id=I00631
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