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Re: The O'Buadhaigh Question

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  • Jeff
    Woulfe came to a similar conclusion about the name Bowes/Bowe/Bogue as being derived from Buadhach, Buadhaig. Bear in mind too that these Gaelic names
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 4, 2009
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      Woulfe came to a similar conclusion about the name Bowes/Bowe/Bogue
      as being derived from Buadhach, Buadhaig. Bear in mind too that these
      Gaelic names themselves changed a little over time, Buadhach being
      the earliest version, as far as I gather. The phonetic pronunciation,
      in Munster at least, as O'Boowig (the consonant emphasis on the 'B'
      would be heard/recorded as O'Boowee, O'Bowee or O'Bowe. Regards


      Regards. --- In bowesvariantsdna@yahoogroups.com, "mhbowes11"
      <mhbowes@...> wrote:
      >
      > Unfortunately I found that Edward MacLysaght died in 1986. He "was
      one of the foremost
      > genealogists of twentieth century Ireland." His numerous books on
      Irish surnames built
      > upon the work of Patrick Woulfe's Irish Names and Surnames (1923)."
      >
      > Next task here would be to see what Woulfe said about this question.
      >
      > --- In bowesvariantsdna@yahoogroups.com, "mhbowes11" <mhbowes@>
      wrote:
      > >
      > > I found the source I'd used! here's my entry in the surname
      origins doc:
      > >
      > > FROM http://www.goireland.com/genealogy/scripts/Family.asp?
      > > FamilyID=432&submit=Check+Your+Name
      > >
      > > "Bogue and Bowe are anglicized forms of the Gaelic Ó Buadhaigh,
      probably derived
      > from the
      > > adjective buadhach, victorious. Bogue is usual in Co. Cork and
      Bowe in the midland
      > counties.
      > > The sept was located in the Corca Laoidhe country (south-west
      Cork). ..."
      > >
      > > [NOTE: goireland.com does not state the source for their account.
      With the occurrence
      > of
      > > other Buadhachs in early texts, how do we know Gaelic origin Bowe-
      s anglicized *this*
      > > Buadhaigh? , Surnames of Ireland, Dublin, 1985 simply states Bowe-
      s is a synonym of
      > Bogue.
      > > Bogue is tied to *the* Ó Buadhaigh, but it's really not clear or
      evidence-based whether
      > > synonym was intended to mean "identical" as opposed to "they
      share the same
      > meaning." If
      > > the former, they may both have origins as this son of Malodar. If
      the latter, Gaelic
      > Bowe-s
      > > could derive from other Buadachs in the ancient texts, all simply
      meaning 'victorious.".]
      > >
      > > We really must try to locate MacLysaght, Edward and ask him about
      it. Any volunteers
      > while I
      > > continue working up this website? Or is 1985 the publication date
      of an older text for
      > which
      > > the author is deceased?
      > >
      >
    • bowe_f
      ... Bowes/Bowe/Bogue ... these ... pronunciation, ... the B ... He was ... on ... (1923). ... question. ... Buadhaigh, ... account. ... Bowe- ... Bowe- ...
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 7, 2009
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        --- In bowesvariantsdna@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <bowes2000@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Woulfe came to a similar conclusion about the name
        Bowes/Bowe/Bogue
        > as being derived from Buadhach, Buadhaig. Bear in mind too that
        these
        > Gaelic names themselves changed a little over time, Buadhach being
        > the earliest version, as far as I gather. The phonetic
        pronunciation,
        > in Munster at least, as O'Boowig (the consonant emphasis on
        the 'B'
        > would be heard/recorded as O'Boowee, O'Bowee or O'Bowe. Regards
        >
        >
        > Regards. --- In bowesvariantsdna@yahoogroups.com, "mhbowes11"
        > <mhbowes@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Unfortunately I found that Edward MacLysaght died in 1986.
        He "was
        > one of the foremost
        > > genealogists of twentieth century Ireland." His numerous books
        on
        > Irish surnames built
        > > upon the work of Patrick Woulfe's Irish Names and Surnames
        (1923)."
        > >
        > > Next task here would be to see what Woulfe said about this
        question.
        > >
        > > --- In bowesvariantsdna@yahoogroups.com, "mhbowes11" <mhbowes@>
        > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I found the source I'd used! here's my entry in the surname
        > origins doc:
        > > >
        > > > FROM http://www.goireland.com/genealogy/scripts/Family.asp?
        > > > FamilyID=432&submit=Check+Your+Name
        > > >
        > > > "Bogue and Bowe are anglicized forms of the Gaelic Ó
        Buadhaigh,
        > probably derived
        > > from the
        > > > adjective buadhach, victorious. Bogue is usual in Co. Cork and
        > Bowe in the midland
        > > counties.
        > > > The sept was located in the Corca Laoidhe country (south-west
        > Cork). ..."
        > > >
        > > > [NOTE: goireland.com does not state the source for their
        account.
        > With the occurrence
        > > of
        > > > other Buadhachs in early texts, how do we know Gaelic origin
        Bowe-
        > s anglicized *this*
        > > > Buadhaigh? , Surnames of Ireland, Dublin, 1985 simply states
        Bowe-
        > s is a synonym of
        > > Bogue.
        > > > Bogue is tied to *the* Ó Buadhaigh, but it's really not clear
        or
        > evidence-based whether
        > > > synonym was intended to mean "identical" as opposed to "they
        > share the same
        > > meaning." If
        > > > the former, they may both have origins as this son of Malodar.
        If
        > the latter, Gaelic
        > > Bowe-s
        > > > could derive from other Buadachs in the ancient texts, all
        simply
        > meaning 'victorious.".]
        > > >
        > > > We really must try to locate MacLysaght, Edward and ask him
        about
        > it. Any volunteers
        > > while I
        > > > continue working up this website? Or is 1985 the publication
        date
        > of an older text for
        > > which
        > > > the author is deceased?
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • bowe_f
        ... probably derived from the ... Bowe in the midland counties. ... Cork). ... ... With the occurrence of ... s anglicized *this* ... s is a synonym of Bogue.
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 7, 2009
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          --- In bowesvariantsdna@yahoogroups.com, "mhbowes11" <mhbowes@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I found the source I'd used! here's my entry in the surname
          origins doc:
          >
          > FROM http://www.goireland.com/genealogy/scripts/Family.asp?
          > FamilyID=432&submit=Check+Your+Name
          >
          > "Bogue and Bowe are anglicized forms of the Gaelic Ó Buadhaigh,
          probably derived from the
          > adjective buadhach, victorious. Bogue is usual in Co. Cork and
          Bowe in the midland counties.
          > The sept was located in the Corca Laoidhe country (south-west
          Cork). ..."
          >
          > [NOTE: goireland.com does not state the source for their account.
          With the occurrence of
          > other Buadhachs in early texts, how do we know Gaelic origin Bowe-
          s anglicized *this*
          > Buadhaigh? , Surnames of Ireland, Dublin, 1985 simply states Bowe-
          s is a synonym of Bogue.
          > Bogue is tied to *the* Ó Buadhaigh, but it's really not clear or
          evidence-based whether
          > synonym was intended to mean "identical" as opposed to "they share
          the same meaning." If
          > the former, they may both have origins as this son of Malodar. If
          the latter, Gaelic Bowe-s
          > could derive from other Buadachs in the ancient texts, all simply
          meaning 'victorious.".]
          >
          > We really must try to locate MacLysaght, Edward and ask him about
          it. Any volunteers while I
          > continue working up this website? Or is 1985 the publication date
          of an older text for which
          > the author is deceased?
          >
        • bowe_f
          ... account. ... Bowe- ... Bowe- ... share ... If ... simply ... about ... date
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 7, 2009
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            --- In bowesvariantsdna@yahoogroups.com, "bowe_f" <bowe_f@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In bowesvariantsdna@yahoogroups.com, "mhbowes11" <mhbowes@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > I found the source I'd used! here's my entry in the surname
            > origins doc:
            > >
            > > FROM http://www.goireland.com/genealogy/scripts/Family.asp?
            > > FamilyID=432&submit=Check+Your+Name
            > >
            > > "Bogue and Bowe are anglicized forms of the Gaelic Ó Buadhaigh,
            > probably derived from the
            > > adjective buadhach, victorious. Bogue is usual in Co. Cork and
            > Bowe in the midland counties.
            > > The sept was located in the Corca Laoidhe country (south-west
            > Cork). ..."
            > >
            > > [NOTE: goireland.com does not state the source for their
            account.
            > With the occurrence of
            > > other Buadhachs in early texts, how do we know Gaelic origin
            Bowe-
            > s anglicized *this*
            > > Buadhaigh? , Surnames of Ireland, Dublin, 1985 simply states
            Bowe-
            > s is a synonym of Bogue.
            > > Bogue is tied to *the* Ó Buadhaigh, but it's really not clear or
            > evidence-based whether
            > > synonym was intended to mean "identical" as opposed to "they
            share
            > the same meaning." If
            > > the former, they may both have origins as this son of Malodar.
            If
            > the latter, Gaelic Bowe-s
            > > could derive from other Buadachs in the ancient texts, all
            simply
            > meaning 'victorious.".]
            > >
            > > We really must try to locate MacLysaght, Edward and ask him
            about
            > it. Any volunteers while I
            > > continue working up this website? Or is 1985 the publication
            date
            > of an older text for which
            > > the author is deceased?
            > >
            >
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