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Fw: Diggers find Bryant's Dream Hole

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  • Cathy in NH
    ... From: Cathy in NH To: BB Tack Sent: Thursday, March 04, 2010 10:16 PM Subject: Fw: Diggers find Bryant s Dream Hole Hopes this forwards ok. Ya never know
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 4, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, March 04, 2010 10:16 PM
      Subject: Fw: Diggers find Bryant's Dream Hole

      Hopes this forwards ok. Ya never know on yahoo groups. If it doesn't check out latest American Bottle Auctions web site newsletter.
       
      Kinda cool "discovery". To us today, we look at a hand blown bottle and realize what work it took to make that particular bottle, and the fact that they made THOUSANDS or MILLIONS of them, and yet few survive.... that have been found, anyway.
       
      There is the site of an old school house 1/4 mile down my road. I know the owner of the land. Building is totally gone. School house was in use early 1800's - early 1900's. Bet there is alot of old inks there somewhere. Does anyone know where school teachers at the time would of chucked them??? Oh I am definately gonna try to find the old outhouse. It would be nice to find some old whiskey bottles in there... I am sure winters got very long for the school teachers too...
       
      Cathy in NH
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 2010 11:47 AM
      Subject: Diggers find Bryant's Dream Hole

      Notice the Difference in Color

       
       
      Diggers Find Bryant's Bitters Hole
      The Elusive Bryant's turns up in numbers
      A couple diggers from Sacramento, Bob Leonard and his friend Rick have found the hole they were looking for, well kind of. Over the last week the two have pulled out a half-dozen examples of the elusive Bryant's Bitters cone, a bottle that has sold for over $70,000. The bottles have appeared in less than perfect condition, to say the least. Although some have been only parts of bases, they have managed to find a beautiful emerald green example with about a half-inch of much of the base missing. Not exactly the Holy Grail but it's a good start. "Poor Rick," Bob starts out, "he dug the almost whole one from the top down. It looked about perfect until he got to the bottom." What Rick discovered at the end of the rainbow, or Bryant's Bitters, was the base was partially broken off. "I thought we had a whole one," said Rick, "maybe next time," he laments, eyeing the still beautiful and nearly whole example.
      This isn't the first time the pair has experienced the excitement of finding arguably the rarest and most desirable western bottle known. Back in the 1970's, they discovered one of the only whole known examples. "We had it in a safe-deposit box and one of the owners took it and we haven't' seen it since," says Bob dryly. If redemption is to be had, the time is now. "We are still looking and even if we don't find another one, this one is still a gorgeous bottle and can be made to be very presentable," Bob points out. Presentable indeed. The color is unlike any of the Bryant's we've seen. It's a little lighter and a different shade of green. Whereas the few examples known are an olive green, this one leans much more towards the emerald shade. It's a beautiful bottle by any collector's standard.
      So, what is one to do with a bottle that has part of the base missing? Well, since they have the bases of a number of others, it won't be a huge deal to combine the half-inch or so needed to complete the necessary merging of the two. Since the bottom is largely hard to see sitting on a shelf, the variance in hue won't be much affected.
      "Hey, its a Bryant's cone and you don't find these ever," Rick points out. No truer words have been spoken. Made around 1859, in the minds of the Bryant's Bitters folks, this oddly shaped container just wasn't going to work. It was too gangly and most likely fell over more often than not. They quickly switched to another popular bottle with the same embossing but in a completely different shape, a six-sided lady's leg highly desired by collectors today. The cone shape was scrapped and after a very short production run, were discarded and left for collectors to droll over a hundred years later. But so few were made that even pieces are tough to find. To pull out as many incredibly rare bottles is virtually unheard of in the bottle world. It would be like finding a half-dozen copies of the Declaration of Independence in a drawer. It just doesn't happen.
      So what's next? "We'll be putting it up for sale after the repair," says Bob. We aren't quite sure how or where but it will be going to a good home," says Bob surveying the various pieces. What kind of value are we looking at? Well it's know that an example with a replaced top, in other words the bottle was there and an original top was placed on the body sold for $30,000 privately. Another example sold in our auction for around $10,000, that was the same bottle years later. Another we heard of changed hands in the $15,000 range and there were other sales of repaired examples. The rare color could make it a bigger prize for the pair of diggers. "You don't see that color in this bottle," Bob points out correctly. It's not one we've seen before and is really very beautiful. It also gives us more information on the bottle itself. It is believed they made only one batch, but with this color variant one would have to believe that they made more. It's possible they made quite a few but destroyed them after deciding to go with a new shape. Regardless, it's an exciting time for Bob and Rick, two diggers with a lot of passion and dedication. "We've been digging for nearly forty years," Bob says. "That's a lot of dirt," he laughs. Not many bottle diggers can say they've found a Bryant's cone. Not to mention with 30 years in between the digs. That's a lot of time.
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    • Pamela Hegedus
      Yes, it came out fine.  Thanks for posting it. I got this too, and boy would it be nice to find something like this rarity and really get a bit rich!!  
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 4, 2010
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        Yes, it came out fine.  Thanks for posting it. I got this too, and boy would it be nice to find something like this rarity and really get a bit rich!!
         
        Another two-three weeks and hopefully the snow will have melted, the ground thawed and we'll be out digging.
         
        Pam (Bottlecindy)
         
         
         
         
         


        --- On Thu, 3/4/10, Cathy in NH <bbhorsetack@...> wrote:

        From: Cathy in NH <bbhorsetack@...>
        Subject: [Bottle Collectors] Fw: Diggers find Bryant's Dream Hole
        To: bottlecollectors@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, March 4, 2010, 10:32 PM

         
        
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, March 04, 2010 10:16 PM
        Subject: Fw: Diggers find Bryant's Dream Hole

        Hopes this forwards ok. Ya never know on yahoo groups. If it doesn't check out latest American Bottle Auctions web site newsletter.
         
        Kinda cool "discovery". To us today, we look at a hand blown bottle and realize what work it took to make that particular bottle, and the fact that they made THOUSANDS or MILLIONS of them, and yet few survive.... that have been found, anyway.
         
        There is the site of an old school house 1/4 mile down my road. I know the owner of the land. Building is totally gone. School house was in use early 1800's - early 1900's. Bet there is alot of old inks there somewhere. Does anyone know where school teachers at the time would of chucked them??? Oh I am definately gonna try to find the old outhouse. It would be nice to find some old whiskey bottles in there... I am sure winters got very long for the school teachers too...
         
        Cathy in NH
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 2010 11:47 AM
        Subject: Diggers find Bryant's Dream Hole

        Notice the Difference in Color

         
        Diggers Find Bryant's Bitters Hole
        The Elusive Bryant's turns up in numbers
        A couple diggers from Sacramento, Bob Leonard and his friend Rick have found the hole they were looking for, well kind of. Over the last week the two have pulled out a half-dozen examples of the elusive Bryant's Bitters cone, a bottle that has sold for over $70,000. The bottles have appeared in less than perfect condition, to say the least. Although some have been only parts of bases, they have managed to find a beautiful emerald green example with about a half-inch of much of the base missing. Not exactly the Holy Grail but it's a good start. "Poor Rick," Bob starts out, "he dug the almost whole one from the top down. It looked about perfect until he got to the bottom." What Rick discovered at the end of the rainbow, or Bryant's Bitters, was the base was partially broken off. "I thought we had a whole one," said Rick, "maybe next time," he laments, eyeing the still beautiful and nearly whole example.
        This isn't the first time the pair has experienced the excitement of finding arguably the rarest and most desirable western bottle known. Back in the 1970's, they discovered one of the only whole known examples. "We had it in a safe-deposit box and one of the owners took it and we haven't' seen it since," says Bob dryly. If redemption is to be had, the time is now. "We are still looking and even if we don't find another one, this one is still a gorgeous bottle and can be made to be very presentable, " Bob points out. Presentable indeed. The color is unlike any of the Bryant's we've seen. It's a little lighter and a different shade of green. Whereas the few examples known are an olive green, this one leans much more towards the emerald shade. It's a beautiful bottle by any collector's standard.
        So, what is one to do with a bottle that has part of the base missing? Well, since they have the bases of a number of others, it won't be a huge deal to combine the half-inch or so needed to complete the necessary merging of the two. Since the bottom is largely hard to see sitting on a shelf, the variance in hue won't be much affected.
        "Hey, its a Bryant's cone and you don't find these ever," Rick points out. No truer words have been spoken. Made around 1859, in the minds of the Bryant's Bitters folks, this oddly shaped container just wasn't going to work. It was too gangly and most likely fell over more often than not. They quickly switched to another popular bottle with the same embossing but in a completely different shape, a six-sided lady's leg highly desired by collectors today. The cone shape was scrapped and after a very short production run, were discarded and left for collectors to droll over a hundred years later. But so few were made that even pieces are tough to find. To pull out as many incredibly rare bottles is virtually unheard of in the bottle world. It would be like finding a half-dozen copies of the Declaration of Independence in a drawer. It just doesn't happen.
        So what's next? "We'll be putting it up for sale after the repair," says Bob. We aren't quite sure how or where but it will be going to a good home," says Bob surveying the various pieces. What kind of value are we looking at? Well it's know that an example with a replaced top, in other words the bottle was there and an original top was placed on the body sold for $30,000 privately. Another example sold in our auction for around $10,000, that was the same bottle years later. Another we heard of changed hands in the $15,000 range and there were other sales of repaired examples. The rare color could make it a bigger prize for the pair of diggers. "You don't see that color in this bottle," Bob points out correctly. It's not one we've seen before and is really very beautiful. It also gives us more information on the bottle itself. It is believed they made only one batch, but with this color variant one would have to believe that they made more. It's possible they made quite a few but destroyed them after deciding to go with a new shape. Regardless, it's an exciting time for Bob and Rick, two diggers with a lot of passion and dedication. "We've been digging for nearly forty years," Bob says. "That's a lot of dirt," he laughs. Not many bottle diggers can say they've found a Bryant's cone. Not to mention with 30 years in between the digs. That's a lot of time.
         
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        This email was sent to bbhorsetack@ adelphia. net by info@americanbottle .com.
        American Bottle Auctions | 2523 J. Street | Suite 203 | Sacramento | CA | 95816

      • chris flanders
        ... From: Cathy in NH Subject: [Bottle Collectors] Fw: Diggers find Bryant s Dream Hole To: bottlecollectors@yahoogroups.com Date:
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 10, 2010
        • 1 Attachment
        • 2.4 MB


        --- On Thu, 3/4/10, Cathy in NH <bbhorsetack@...> wrote:

        From: Cathy in NH <bbhorsetack@...>
        Subject: [Bottle Collectors] Fw: Diggers find Bryant's Dream Hole
        To: bottlecollectors@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, March 4, 2010, 10:32 PM

          Hi,I am a N.H. digger and have dug at a couple old school house locations here in the central Lakes Region one abutting my property.Only once have I located trashpits directly at the school site.The dump on my property had lots of old inks including a nice stoddard master ink.Also another farm dump next to a sschool house site produced many more inks than normal.I think they may have taken school trash .Outhouses here in n.h. were usually built in the splash board fashion so that bottom board could be removed and cleanout done.Those that were dug were dip cleaned.But this being the Granite State the preffered method was the splashboard type.My guess is that the next door farmer would have cleaned outhouse and delivered contents to his own dump,Bttldiga
        
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, March 04, 2010 10:16 PM
        Subject: Fw: Diggers find Bryant's Dream Hole

        Hopes this forwards ok. Ya never know on yahoo groups. If it doesn't check out latest American Bottle Auctions web site newsletter.
         
        Kinda cool "discovery". To us today, we look at a hand blown bottle and realize what work it took to make that particular bottle, and the fact that they made THOUSANDS or MILLIONS of them, and yet few survive.... that have been found, anyway.
         
        There is the site of an old school house 1/4 mile down my road. I know the owner of the land. Building is totally gone. School house was in use early 1800's - early 1900's. Bet there is alot of old inks there somewhere. Does anyone know where school teachers at the time would of chucked them??? Oh I am definately gonna try to find the old outhouse. It would be nice to find some old whiskey bottles in there... I am sure winters got very long for the school teachers too...
         
        Cathy in NH
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 2010 11:47 AM
        Subject: Diggers find Bryant's Dream Hole

        Notice the Difference in Color

         
        Diggers Find Bryant's Bitters Hole
        The Elusive Bryant's turns up in numbers
        A couple diggers from Sacramento, Bob Leonard and his friend Rick have found the hole they were looking for, well kind of. Over the last week the two have pulled out a half-dozen examples of the elusive Bryant's Bitters cone, a bottle that has sold for over $70,000. The bottles have appeared in less than perfect condition, to say the least. Although some have been only parts of bases, they have managed to find a beautiful emerald green example with about a half-inch of much of the base missing. Not exactly the Holy Grail but it's a good start. "Poor Rick," Bob starts out, "he dug the almost whole one from the top down. It looked about perfect until he got to the bottom." What Rick discovered at the end of the rainbow, or Bryant's Bitters, was the base was partially broken off. "I thought we had a whole one," said Rick, "maybe next time," he laments, eyeing the still beautiful and nearly whole example.
        This isn't the first time the pair has experienced the excitement of finding arguably the rarest and most desirable western bottle known. Back in the 1970's, they discovered one of the only whole known examples. "We had it in a safe-deposit box and one of the owners took it and we haven't' seen it since," says Bob dryly. If redemption is to be had, the time is now. "We are still looking and even if we don't find another one, this one is still a gorgeous bottle and can be made to be very presentable, " Bob points out. Presentable indeed. The color is unlike any of the Bryant's we've seen. It's a little lighter and a different shade of green. Whereas the few examples known are an olive green, this one leans much more towards the emerald shade. It's a beautiful bottle by any collector's standard.
        So, what is one to do with a bottle that has part of the base missing? Well, since they have the bases of a number of others, it won't be a huge deal to combine the half-inch or so needed to complete the necessary merging of the two. Since the bottom is largely hard to see sitting on a shelf, the variance in hue won't be much affected.
        "Hey, its a Bryant's cone and you don't find these ever," Rick points out. No truer words have been spoken. Made around 1859, in the minds of the Bryant's Bitters folks, this oddly shaped container just wasn't going to work. It was too gangly and most likely fell over more often than not. They quickly switched to another popular bottle with the same embossing but in a completely different shape, a six-sided lady's leg highly desired by collectors today. The cone shape was scrapped and after a very short production run, were discarded and left for collectors to droll over a hundred years later. But so few were made that even pieces are tough to find. To pull out as many incredibly rare bottles is virtually unheard of in the bottle world. It would be like finding a half-dozen copies of the Declaration of Independence in a drawer. It just doesn't happen.
        So what's next? "We'll be putting it up for sale after the repair," says Bob. We aren't quite sure how or where but it will be going to a good home," says Bob surveying the various pieces. What kind of value are we looking at? Well it's know that an example with a replaced top, in other words the bottle was there and an original top was placed on the body sold for $30,000 privately. Another example sold in our auction for around $10,000, that was the same bottle years later. Another we heard of changed hands in the $15,000 range and there were other sales of repaired examples. The rare color could make it a bigger prize for the pair of diggers. "You don't see that color in this bottle," Bob points out correctly. It's not one we've seen before and is really very beautiful. It also gives us more information on the bottle itself. It is believed they made only one batch, but with this color variant one would have to believe that they made more. It's possible they made quite a few but destroyed them after deciding to go with a new shape. Regardless, it's an exciting time for Bob and Rick, two diggers with a lot of passion and dedication. "We've been digging for nearly forty years," Bob says. "That's a lot of dirt," he laughs. Not many bottle diggers can say they've found a Bryant's cone. Not to mention with 30 years in between the digs. That's a lot of time.
         
        Safe Unsubscribe
        This email was sent to bbhorsetack@ adelphia. net by info@americanbottle .com.
        American Bottle Auctions | 2523 J. Street | Suite 203 | Sacramento | CA | 95816

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