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RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS bottles

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  • Harry
    http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/bottlecollectors/ photos/view/d391?b=27 (If this hyperlink doesn t work, copy and paste it into your browser window.) Here are
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 2, 2007
      http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/bottlecollectors/
      photos/view/d391?b=27

      (If this hyperlink doesn't work, copy and paste it into your browser
      window.)

      Here are two examples of a fairly common bottle which is a great-
      looking window bottle. Most of the RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS bottles
      I've seen are made in an attractive blue-green ("teal") or deep-
      aquamarine.

      To illustrate, here's a couple from my shelf. They are slightly
      different in color, but close -- the inevitable consequence of
      different batches of glass, possibly a different glass works.

      Of this pair, only the half-pint is base-embossed, PATENTED MARCH 10,
      1868. The pint bottle base is unembossed.

      This half-pint has an old paper label (which fell off when I went to
      photograph the pair) which says:
      WARRANTED
      PURE BAY RUM
      MANUFACTURED BY
      E. L. SWEETSER
      NEWBURYPORT, MASS.

      This label, I'm confident, represents a secondary use for another
      company's bottle. I think that Rumford did NOT make bay rum. Rumford
      Chemical Works was located in Rumford, Rhode Island.

      Rumford made food-related chemicals, best known for baking powder. It
      seems unlikely that these attractive bottles were used for powder,
      but I don't know what they contained originally. If you have an
      example with a Rumford label, let us hear from you.

      There is a lot of information available on this company if you do a
      web-search.

      -----------Harry Pristis
    • Pamela Hegedus
      Harry: Thanks for the details on this bottle, and as many other bottles with embossing, this one was obviously used for several ingredients. Interesting...I
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 2, 2007
        Harry:
        Thanks for the details on this bottle, and as many other bottles with embossing, this one was obviously used for several ingredients.  Interesting...I don't have a labelled one, but have seen them with the Bay Rum on them.  One had a poor label and the other was decent. I dug teal colored one--quite dark too, this summer and in fact, have a lovely mint condition teal one here ready to list tonight on ebay.  I love the colored bottles, and there are always new things to learn about bottles, their use, companies and their history and so on.
         
        Thanks for sharing this.
        Pam (Bottlecindy)
         


        Harry <pristis@...> wrote:

        http://ph.groups. yahoo.com/ group/bottlecoll ectors/
        photos/view/ d391?b=27

        (If this hyperlink doesn't work, copy and paste it into your browser
        window.)

        Here are two examples of a fairly common bottle which is a great-
        looking window bottle. Most of the RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS bottles
        I've seen are made in an attractive blue-green ("teal") or deep-
        aquamarine.

        To illustrate, here's a couple from my shelf. They are slightly
        different in color, but close -- the inevitable consequence of
        different batches of glass, possibly a different glass works.

        Of this pair, only the half-pint is base-embossed, PATENTED MARCH 10,
        1868. The pint bottle base is unembossed.

        This half-pint has an old paper label (which fell off when I went to
        photograph the pair) which says:
        WARRANTED
        PURE BAY RUM
        MANUFACTURED BY
        E. L. SWEETSER
        NEWBURYPORT, MASS.

        This label, I'm confident, represents a secondary use for another
        company's bottle. I think that Rumford did NOT make bay rum. Rumford
        Chemical Works was located in Rumford, Rhode Island.

        Rumford made food-related chemicals, best known for baking powder. It
        seems unlikely that these attractive bottles were used for powder,
        but I don't know what they contained originally. If you have an
        example with a Rumford label, let us hear from you.

        There is a lot of information available on this company if you do a
        web-search.

        -----------Harry Pristis



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