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Re: [AHRC - botlanta] Learning ARM processors

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  • Randy Farmer
    I m a big fan of Netduino but it helps that I m already a C#/.Net developer. It comes in Arduino mini and Arduino Uno form factor (with and without built-in
    Message 1 of 9 , May 14, 2012
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      I'm a big fan of Netduino but it helps that I'm already a C#/.Net developer. It comes in Arduino mini and Arduino Uno form factor (with and without built-in Ethernet).

      GHI has some similar boards (FEZ Panda)

      Both GHI and Secret Labs (Netduino) have new boards (Gadgeteer and Netduino Go respectively) that have gotten away from the Arduino form factor and moved to multiple 10 wire ports, each with power, ground, and multiple buses. Netduino has a Base Module that hooks into this bus and gives you an Arduino shield pinout. You can actually hook up two of them, a nice way around pin conflicts on shields (if you're a shield person). I prefer to just have raw GPIO outs.

      --Randy


      On Mon, May 14, 2012 at 7:52 PM, tedrobotbuilder <tedrobotbuilder@...> wrote:
       

      For ARM you could go with:

      -Netduino
      -Maple from leaflabs
      -mbed

      We have people in the club using Netduino and mbed.

      Ted

    • James Belcher
      The Mbed is really good, it has a pretty active user forum, and the online compiler tool chain is online, and is completely accessible anywhere you have an
      Message 2 of 9 , May 14, 2012
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        The Mbed is really good, it has a pretty active user forum, and the online compiler tool chain is online, and is completely accessible anywhere you have an internet connection.  It's even possible to compile offline, if you need to, but I really like the ability to have the project files stored online.  There is a ton of built in hardware in the Mbed as well, for ethernet, USB host, all kinds of stuff.  Any libraries you want to share you can make public and have anyone else have access to.  They even have a low end Mbed that can be used for emulation of USB devices such as keyboards and mice.  I even made a box that wrote macro scripts for World of Warcraft back when it was possible, using an Mbed emulating a USB keyboard.  I love the fact that it just shows up as a usb flash drive, you drop in the binary and restart the chip and it just runs. You can even pull of data logs off the usb flash portion.  Very handy. 

        On Mon, May 14, 2012 at 10:43 PM, Ben Bradley <ben.pi.bradley@...> wrote:
         

        I think EVERY semiconductor maker makes ARM chips thesedays (Look under licensees here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARM_architecture). A few years ago TI bought Luminary Micro, a startup making ARM chips, even though TI already made its own ARM chips. If you don't like a manufacturer's development system, there's IAR, Keil and other independent commercial development systems for just about every manufacturer's ARMs. IAR (and perhaps others) has free code-limited versions (you have to register to activate it), and I think the code limitations actually give you a lot of space to work with. There's also free GNU compilers and development systems.

        You can attend this free seminar June 5 in Atlanta (Gwinnett), and get a free STM32M0 development board (not as powerful as the F4 board that I have, but as a 32 bit ARM it's still an order of magnitude faster than 8 bit or 16 bit microcontrollers. I've used code-limited version of the IAR compiler with mine.
        http://www.st.com/internet/com/Learning/stm32f0_seminars.jsp?d=nuhorizons_na&WT.mc_id=nuhorizons_apr12_stm32f0seminar

        TI has these for $149, but I recall a couple years ago they had eval boards starting around $40 to $50 but not sure where to find them on the TI site:
        http://www.ti.com/ww/en/mcu/cortex_m4f/pg_kits.html
        http://www.ti.com/tool/ek-evalbot

        And there's the mbed, as mentioned:
        http://mbed.org/


        On Mon, May 14, 2012 at 7:52 PM, tedrobotbuilder <tedrobotbuilder@...> wrote:
        For ARM you could go with:

        -Netduino
        -Maple from leaflabs
        -mbed

        We have people in the club using Netduino and mbed.

        Ted


        --- In botlanta@yahoogroups.com, "Russ" <russnagel1@...> wrote:
        >
        > All
        >
        > I am looking at learning more about ARM processor core microcontrollers. Does anyone have any suggestions? I want to hear about IDEs, dev boards, what brand and what processor? I'm definitely looking ahead at what might be popular in the future.
        >
        > Russ
        >




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      • James Belcher
        I am also looking at the .Net gadgeteer hardware. I m really interested in the GHI hardware.
        Message 3 of 9 , May 14, 2012
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          I am also looking at the .Net gadgeteer hardware.  I'm really interested in the GHI hardware.

          On Mon, May 14, 2012 at 10:51 PM, Randy Farmer <randy.farmer@...> wrote:
           

          I'm a big fan of Netduino but it helps that I'm already a C#/.Net developer. It comes in Arduino mini and Arduino Uno form factor (with and without built-in Ethernet).

          GHI has some similar boards (FEZ Panda)

          Both GHI and Secret Labs (Netduino) have new boards (Gadgeteer and Netduino Go respectively) that have gotten away from the Arduino form factor and moved to multiple 10 wire ports, each with power, ground, and multiple buses. Netduino has a Base Module that hooks into this bus and gives you an Arduino shield pinout. You can actually hook up two of them, a nice way around pin conflicts on shields (if you're a shield person). I prefer to just have raw GPIO outs.

          --Randy


          On Mon, May 14, 2012 at 7:52 PM, tedrobotbuilder <tedrobotbuilder@...> wrote:
           

          For ARM you could go with:

          -Netduino
          -Maple from leaflabs
          -mbed

          We have people in the club using Netduino and mbed.

          Ted


        • R Radford
          If looking for ARM hardware, don t forget the Beagle Board - this board has a lot of open source software ported to it and it is a very capable system. We
          Message 4 of 9 , May 14, 2012
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            If looking for ARM hardware, don't forget the Beagle Board - this board has a lot of open source software ported to it and it is a very capable system.  We used it as an early prototype for a video capture and compression system and it still had enough horse power to handle image extraction/detection as well.

            There is also the new, lower cost and lower performance, Beagle Bone system.  I don't know anything about it other than it was discussed at the recent CarolinaCon with several favorable comments.

            http://beagleboard.org/


            On Mon, May 14, 2012 at 11:19 PM, James Belcher <jamesbel@...> wrote:
             

            I am also looking at the .Net gadgeteer hardware.  I'm really interested in the GHI hardware.



            On Mon, May 14, 2012 at 10:51 PM, Randy Farmer <randy.farmer@...> wrote:
             

            I'm a big fan of Netduino but it helps that I'm already a C#/.Net developer. It comes in Arduino mini and Arduino Uno form factor (with and without built-in Ethernet).

            GHI has some similar boards (FEZ Panda)

            Both GHI and Secret Labs (Netduino) have new boards (Gadgeteer and Netduino Go respectively) that have gotten away from the Arduino form factor and moved to multiple 10 wire ports, each with power, ground, and multiple buses. Netduino has a Base Module that hooks into this bus and gives you an Arduino shield pinout. You can actually hook up two of them, a nice way around pin conflicts on shields (if you're a shield person). I prefer to just have raw GPIO outs.

            --Randy


            On Mon, May 14, 2012 at 7:52 PM, tedrobotbuilder <tedrobotbuilder@...> wrote:
             

            For ARM you could go with:

            -Netduino
            -Maple from leaflabs
            -mbed

            We have people in the club using Netduino and mbed.

            Ted



          • Jebadiah Moulton
            I am using the SuperPRO from Coridium http://www.coridiumcorp.com/Products.php It is an NXP LPC1756 32bit ARM M3Cortex development board fro $49. They have
            Message 5 of 9 , May 15, 2012
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              I am using the SuperPRO from Coridium
              It is an NXP LPC1756 32bit ARM M3Cortex development board fro $49.  They have one for $35 also. 52 IO.  I think Dale and Clint are using similar ones to the ARMexpress boards at the bottom of the page and I think they were the NXP 1768 chip.  It comes with a free C or BASIC compiler and I use Notepad++ for writing the programs.  I am still at the beginning stages of learning it so I can't provide much help.  There are some nice Yahoo groups for it though(ARMexpress).

              I plan on eventually using the Arduino Pro which is the same form factor and can attach the Coridium board for off board processing
              http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10915 

              Have you looked at the AVR stuff?  They have some ARMs.  I know you are an AVR guy.

              --
              Jebadiah Moulton




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