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10 Toughest Crossings

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  • Phil Lacefield Jr.
    http://jalopnik.com/the-ten-toughest-border-crossings-in-the-world-1440128765 Combining two of my favorite subjects - cars and borders! :-) Phil
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 2, 2013
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      http://jalopnik.com/the-ten-toughest-border-crossings-in-the-world-1440128765

      Combining two of my favorite subjects - cars and borders! :-)

      Phil 
    • RayM
      Very cool. BASE-worthy Iain: have you seen this TopGear episode: There was a Top Gear special wherein they were dropped off in Iraq and had to drive their
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 2, 2013
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        Very cool.   BASE-worthy

        Iain:  have you seen this TopGear episode: There was a Top Gear special wherein they were dropped off in Iraq and had to drive their way all the way to Israel. A lot of these border/local issues were encountered by them, up to and including active warzones, mines, political issues (they wouldn't let BBC into Iran), etc.

        Don't miss the break dancing DMZ guards at Panmunjom:  http://youtu.be/itrRDQJfN4M.


        On Wed, Oct 2, 2013 at 12:28 PM, Phil Lacefield Jr. <phil@...> wrote:
         

        http://jalopnik.com/the-ten-toughest-border-crossings-in-the-world-1440128765

        Combining two of my favorite subjects - cars and borders! :-)

        Phil 


      • Goyta' F. Villela Jr.
        ... Well, London Heathrow Airport when I was 20 years old travelling alone on a Brazilian passport, only non-European citizen on a BA flight from Stuttgart,
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 2, 2013
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          > http://jalopnik.com/the-ten-toughest-border-crossings-in-the-world-1440128765
          >
          > Combining two of my favorite subjects - cars and borders! :-)


          Well, London Heathrow Airport when I was 20 years old travelling alone on a Brazilian passport, only non-European citizen on a BA flight from Stuttgart, was tough enough. Those were pre-Schengen days, but continental European borders had all been a cursory breeze (I had crossed Austria four times without coming to know if Austria even had a border guard, because no Austrian officer ever asked me for my passport, and a German officer stamped it on board a running train heading there while still in Swiss territory - with the corner of Austria on Lake Constance still ahead - to save time). So, I wasn't prepared for what awaited me in the UK. Surreal moments included being asked to speak German to an officer who didn't understand the language and having to write down the names and full addresses of everybody who was remotely connected to the organisation of my trip to Europe...

          In the end, I was let in and had a great time in London, but when weeks later I went to Berlin by train crossing what was then still the GDR (and later crossed on foot to East Berlin and back through Checkpoint Charlie), it was child's play in comparison to the Brits. In fact, I was lucky: a friend of mine arriving by ferry in Harwich from the Netherlands was X-rayed and interrogated *naked* for several hours before being let in, for no apparent reason. (If they were thinking about drugs, my friend is vegetarian, doesn't smoke or drink and would never even think of doing drugs.)

          Apparently, British immigration hasn't changed much. Upper middle class Brazilians used to be a large clientele for language schools in England, but even with plenty of money (they're usually wealthy kids, after all) and all documentation in order, there were so many cases of Brazilian students denied entry into the UK that now they go learn English in Dublin instead. The Irish still welcome Brazilian and other foreign students without any fuss, and language schools are a growing business there.


          Best regards,


          Goytá
          São Paulo, Brazil
        • Hugh Wallis
          And the Guinness is better in Ireland too :) ... And the Guinness is better in Ireland too :) On 2 October 2013 14:26, Goyta F. Villela Jr.
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 2, 2013
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            And the Guinness is better in Ireland too :)


            On 2 October 2013 14:26, Goyta' F. Villela Jr. <goytabr@...> wrote:
             

            > http://jalopnik.com/the-ten-toughest-border-crossings-in-the-world-1440128765
            >
            > Combining two of my favorite subjects - cars and borders! :-)

            Well, London Heathrow Airport when I was 20 years old travelling alone on a Brazilian passport, only non-European citizen on a BA flight from Stuttgart, was tough enough. Those were pre-Schengen days, but continental European borders had all been a cursory breeze (I had crossed Austria four times without coming to know if Austria even had a border guard, because no Austrian officer ever asked me for my passport, and a German officer stamped it on board a running train heading there while still in Swiss territory - with the corner of Austria on Lake Constance still ahead - to save time). So, I wasn't prepared for what awaited me in the UK. Surreal moments included being asked to speak German to an officer who didn't understand the language and having to write down the names and full addresses of everybody who was remotely connected to the organisation of my trip to Europe...

            In the end, I was let in and had a great time in London, but when weeks later I went to Berlin by train crossing what was then still the GDR (and later crossed on foot to East Berlin and back through Checkpoint Charlie), it was child's play in comparison to the Brits. In fact, I was lucky: a friend of mine arriving by ferry in Harwich from the Netherlands was X-rayed and interrogated *naked* for several hours before being let in, for no apparent reason. (If they were thinking about drugs, my friend is vegetarian, doesn't smoke or drink and would never even think of doing drugs.)

            Apparently, British immigration hasn't changed much. Upper middle class Brazilians used to be a large clientele for language schools in England, but even with plenty of money (they're usually wealthy kids, after all) and all documentation in order, there were so many cases of Brazilian students denied entry into the UK that now they go learn English in Dublin instead. The Irish still welcome Brazilian and other foreign students without any fuss, and language schools are a growing business there.

            Best regards,

            Goytá
            São Paulo, Brazil


          • David Kendall
            Well, I just think Iran wasn t letting them in because, if they were to go from Iraq to Israel, Iran is the wrong way! They were just trying to help by making
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 2, 2013
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              Well, I just think Iran wasn't letting them in because, if they were to go from Iraq to Israel, Iran is the wrong way!  They were just trying to help by making sure they go west, not east! :)

              Of course, at least all of these are open, legal crossing points. We can all share stories of trying to cross at unrecognized crossing points (not of ourselves, of course!). Like the adventurer who is currently walking around the world and was detained for entering Russia at an unrecognized entry point (the frozen-over Bering Strait). I was also reading about someone attempting to enter South Sudan by car and despite it bordering six other countries, thee is only one border crossing open (on the Kenyan border). 

              On Oct 2, 2013, at 12:01 PM, RayM <mrrayj@...> wrote:

              Very cool.   BASE-worthy

              Iain:  have you seen this TopGear episode: There was a Top Gear special wherein they were dropped off in Iraq and had to drive their way all the way to Israel. A lot of these border/local issues were encountered by them, up to and including active warzones, mines, political issues (they wouldn't let BBC into Iran), etc.

              Don't miss the break dancing DMZ guards at Panmunjom:  http://youtu.be/itrRDQJfN4M.


              On Wed, Oct 2, 2013 at 12:28 PM, Phil Lacefield Jr. <phil@...> wrote:
               

              http://jalopnik.com/the-ten-toughest-border-crossings-in-the-world-1440128765

              Combining two of my favorite subjects - cars and borders! :-)

              Phil 


            • Kevin Meynell
              Goytá, ... For some reason, Harwich always seems to be particularly fussy when it comes to immigration and customs - even for British citizens. Presumably
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 17, 2013
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                Goytá,

                > In fact, I was lucky: a friend of mine arriving by ferry in Harwich
                > from the Netherlands was X-rayed and interrogated *naked* for several
                > hours before being let in, for no apparent reason.

                For some reason, Harwich always seems to be particularly fussy when it
                comes to immigration and customs - even for British citizens. Presumably
                it's the perception of that drugs are imported from the Netherlands.

                > Apparently, British immigration hasn't changed much. Upper middle
                > class Brazilians used to be a large clientele for language schools in
                > England, but even with plenty of money (they're usually wealthy kids,
                > after all) and all documentation in order, there were so many cases of
                > Brazilian students denied entry into the UK that now they go learn
                > English in Dublin instead.

                According to the UK government, there is a significant problem with
                Brazilians coming to the UK and overstaying their visas. As with all
                these things though, kneejerk policies get made that end-up discouraging
                the type of people who are not actually the problem.

                Regards,

                Kevin Meynell
              • Bill Fraser
                We British have always been pragmatic when it comes to admitting Johnny Foreigner. After years of making things tough for Chinese citizens we discovered all
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 17, 2013
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                  We British have always been ‘pragmatic’ when it comes to admitting Johnny Foreigner. After years of making things tough for Chinese citizens we discovered all the tourist trade and industrial development is going to Schengen countries which do make entry much easier.

                   

                  Hence the recent UK government decision which may be characterised as – too little too late:

                  http://www.iol.co.za/travel/travel-news/uk-relaxes-visa-rules-for-chinese-visitors-1.1592171#.Ul_dBVNlnqI

                   

                   

                  Bill Fraser

                   

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