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Re: [borderpoint] Re: smallest intl bridge

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  • Roger McCutcheon
    County Monaghan is in the Republic of Ireland which generally means south of the border, although just to complicate matters the most northerly part of Ireland
    Message 1 of 52 , Jan 19, 2011
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      County Monaghan is in the Republic of Ireland which generally means south of
      the border, although just to complicate matters the most northerly part of
      Ireland is also in the Republic which is often referred to as "The South".
      There is a road south-west of Clones which although straight crosses
      the crooked border four times. Roger & out.
    • lnadybal@philatelic.info
      You mean, as though every unique variation from a norm is ubiquitous with respect to the degree from which it varies from the norm? No wonder we re told we
      Message 52 of 52 , Jan 21, 2011
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        You mean, as though every unique variation from a norm is ubiquitous with
        respect to the degree from which it varies from the norm? No wonder we're
        told we can't use tolerated anomalies as precedence. It would kill
        individuality and make this a boring planet.
        LN




        Original Message:
        -----------------
        From: Lowell G. McManus lgm@...
        Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2011 10:33:47 -0600
        To: borderpoint@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [borderpoint] Re: smallest intl bridge


        Ubiquity, like uniqueness, is an absolute, incapable of degrees. There are
        no things "more" or "less" ubiquitous or unique. One can, however, say
        "more nearly ubiquitous" or "more nearly unique."

        Lowell G. McManus
        Eagle Pass, Texas, USA


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Hugh Wallis
        To: borderpoint@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, January 21, 2011 8:32 AM
        Subject: RE: [borderpoint] Re: smallest intl bridge





        Len,

        > brings up the situation we now have in the Kingdom of the Netherlands,
        > which, on 10.10.10, revamped the relationship of parts of the Kingdom
        > that are in the Caribbean to the motherland. St. Maarten, for example,
        > is now considered (and is called) a "country", when it isn't
        independent.
        >> seemed more ubiquitious <<


        Can you have degrees of ubiquity?

        Rather like "more unique" :)




        ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
        --
        From: borderpoint@yahoogroups.com [mailto:borderpoint@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Kevin Meynell
        Sent: January 21, 2011 14:18
        To: borderpoint@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [borderpoint] Re: smallest intl bridge



        Len,

        > brings up the situation we now have in the Kingdom of the Netherlands,
        > which, on 10.10.10, revamped the relationship of parts of the Kingdom
        > that are in the Caribbean to the motherland. St. Maarten, for example,
        > is now considered (and is called) a "country", when it isn't
        independent.

        I think the term in English would be constituent country (or home
        nation), somewhat akin to the four constituent countries of the UK. Of
        course, a similar arrangement existed with the Netherlands before,
        except there were only three constituent countries (The Netherlands,
        Aruba and the Netherlands Antilles) instead of the now four plus the BES
        islands which have some sort of interim public body status (formerly
        used for the Flevopolder before it became a province).

        > When you add the other parts of the former Netherlands Antilles that
        > are now "countries in their own rights", you have, I think, four
        > official currencies in place (Euro, St. Maarten guilder, US dollar,
        > etc.) and stamps being issued for Nederland (denominated in Euros good
        > in the European portion), Karibisch Nederland (in dollars good in
        > Saba, etc), and St. Maarten (in guidlers for St. Maarten).

        I never really saw the point of the Antillian Guilder. It seemed to be
        rarely used on the Bovenwindse Eilanden and everyone preferred the US
        dollar. Even on French St. Martin the US dollar seemed more ubiquitious
        than the euro.

        > Are these units all getting UN votes like former russian republics?
        > None of these have borders between them, but if they did, what kind of
        > borders would they be vis-a-vis what we've been talking about in
        > reference to the boundary between the the Irelands? Regional,
        > international, country/county??

        The nomenclature is difficult to define because the same terms can mean
        different things in different parts of the world. Borders between
        constituent countries are probably closest to being regional, but
        perhaps a new term is needed...

        Cheers,

        Kevin Meynell







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