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Re: drielandenpunt

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  • kubana2005
    There are no boundary markers between Kosovo and mainland Serbia. But don´t forget that boundary markers can also be used for provinces, municipalities,
    Message 1 of 35 , Apr 1, 2010
      There are no boundary markers between Kosovo and mainland Serbia. But don´t forget that boundary markers can also be used for provinces, municipalities, counties, states, as they don´t have to be used for independent nations only.

      It´s also interesting that during the Neutral Morenset there was no tripoint between Netherlands, Belgium and Germany, but rather 3 tripoints!

      Other similar tripoints in todays world would be Palestine-Egypt-Israel, 2 Palestine-Jordan-Israel, plus several Western Sahara tripoints. Even if Palestine and Western Sahara are not recognized, these tripoints would exist. Similar was the Neutral Territory between Iraq and Saudi Arabia.

      Regards, Alex

      --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, David Kendall <dhkendall@...> wrote:
      >
      > Reading about Drielandenpunt (again - the more I hear about it the more I want to see it!) makes me wonder what happened with this place during WWII, as (ostensibly) all three countries meeting at Drielandenpunt were part of the same country and it was not a border. Or was the area only created after the war?
      >
      > Which leads to another question, in cases such as this, where a country is annexed by another, only to regain its independence - and its original borders - after liberation? I would have thought that during the annexation period the border markings, etc., would be torn down byt he invading nation, so that no memory of the subjugated nation's former free status were known, but then, after liberation, are the border markers replaced with new ones anew? And the border meticulously re-surveyed?
      >
      > Or if the independence from the other nation is unilateral, like Kosovo? Are there border markers on the Kosovo/Serbia border?
      >
    • Leonard
      This message troubled me for some time, because it seemed to be incorrect. Now I know it is, and in one aspect I can say why: That the eastern border wasn t
      Message 35 of 35 , Apr 24, 2010
        This message troubled me for some time, because it seemed to be incorrect. Now I know it is, and in one aspect I can say why:

        That the eastern border wasn't marked isn't true. The SE marker, on south side of the road to Aachen, directly south of where the vierlaenderpunkt was (now tripoint) is still in place.

        The border treaty of 26 June 1918 said the neutral area was to be clearly marked. Poles were used. Pole 193 was at the top of the triangle. In 1869 they were replaced with stones. I - XXX marked the Belgian (west) border, and XXXI - LX marked the side facing Prussia. A straight path was laid along that border that border officials patrolled.

        The lines in the paved area at the Dreilaenderpunkt are enhanced by inlaid brick showing former Moresnet boundaries, and are enhanced by a tall sign about 4-5 meters south from the actual stone that stands where the remaining three borders merge, and it marks the direct north-south line from the tripoint stone that was the eastern border of Neutral Moresnet. There's a big inscription on this sign saying "former border of Neutral Morsenet".

        Len



        --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "Matthias Leube" <Matthias.Leube@...> wrote:
        >
        > Quote from the article:
        >
        > "Neutral Moresnet was a separate territory between 1816 and 1920. It came into existence after the demise of the Napoleonic empire, and was sandwiched between the United Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Kingdom of Prussia. When in 1830 Belgium gained independence from the Netherlands, a four-border point came into being. The area was famous for a zinc spar mine and an experiment with Esperanto. Today it is part of Belgium, but the position of its borders are marked on the paved area around the present day Drielandenpunt. "
        >
        > We have discussed the lines on the paved area before. In my opion, they cannot be the borders of Moresnet, since there are only four lines, three of which are BEDE, DENL and BENL, and neither the western nor the eastern border of Moresnet coincide with today's borders.
        >
        > I came to the conlusion that the fourth line probably is the border between the Belgian communities Kelmis and Plombières, the former being part of the German speaking area "Ostkantone". The fourth line would then be the western border of Moresnet, the eastern not being marked.
        >
        > A counter argument could be that the fourth line is close to the BEDE-line and therefore might be the eastern border of Moresnet, which is no border today. (Besides being separating the Belgian zip code
        > areas 4720 and 4721 according to my map.)
        >
        > Matthias
        >
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: william burke
        > To: borderpoint@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Tuesday, March 30, 2010 4:56 PM
        > Subject: [!! SPAM] [borderpoint] drielandenpunt
        >
        >
        >
        > http://www.dur.ac.uk/ibru/resources/drielandenpunt/
        >
        >
        >
        >
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