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Official currencies

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  • George H
    Greetings to everyone: I have a few questions regarding the official currency of some independent countries and dependencies. Do any of our Borderpoint members
    Message 1 of 80 , Jul 1, 2009
      Greetings to everyone:

      I have a few questions regarding the official currency of some independent countries and dependencies.

      Do any of our Borderpoint members have knowledge on this topic?

      Or can anyone refer me to some other group regarding this topic?

      Thank you in advance for any assistance.

      George
    • L. A. Nadybal
      Oh. Then go to www.linns.com - you can get a $11/yr subscription to the Scott Monthly Stamp Journal on-line editoin - it s the only US based publication that
      Message 80 of 80 , Jul 7, 2009
        Oh.

        Then go to www.linns.com - you can get a $11/yr subscription to the Scott Monthly Stamp Journal on-line editoin - it's the only US based publication that lists all the worlds new stamps as they come out.... what it lists go into the Scott annual stamp catalogs at the end of each year. The catalog is a monstrous, annually issued 6 volume $300+ affair that is supplemented by a single specialized volume for the US related areas.

        Len



        --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "kubana2005" <kubana2005@...> wrote:
        >
        > I was referring more to current stamps (e.g. check out all stamps produced in Hungary in 2006). Nevertheless, thanks for your link.
        >
        > --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "L. A. Nadybal" <lnadybal@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Try this site for postal wars:
        > >
        > > http://home.pages.at/dietbeck/postkrieg/postkrieg_english.htm
        > >
        > > If you google the German google at www.google.de, and search for "Poskrieg", you'll find lots of stuff on postal wars.
        > >
        > > Lundy is a private island in the Bristol Channel. There's no British post office there, so the owner issued "cinderella stamps" (postal labels) and charged visitors who wanted their mail carried to the "mainland". He had to affix his Lundy stamps on the left side of the mail matter, and leave space for the British stamps he had to buy and affix in the upper right, when he remailed the post to the final destinations. In philately, we call these "locals" when the service really existed that the stamps seem to identify. In countries where competition with the state governmental post exists, these may also issue "locals", but that's a little different, because these legally compete with the state, but services like Lundy's were an adjunct, to serve places the post office didn't. The most famous one in the US was Rattlesnake Island local post in Lake Erie. It mirrored the service from Lundy, except that a For Trimotor plane flew the mail - in Lundy it was a small boat that was used.
        > >
        > > Te SMOM is another different matter - it issues "locals" but has concluded postal agreements between itself as a government and governments and postal services of other countries - so springs beyond the concept of "local" service and does so under its limited sovereignty. Lundy has no sovereign rights - it's part of the UK.
        > >
        > > Regards
        > >
        > > Len
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "kubana2005" <kubana2005@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Len, thanks for your explanation. Do you know any website with shows stamps catalogs with pictures? I know many stamp catalog websites, but non show pictures.
        > > >
        > > > Another interesting stamp issues are Lundy and SMOM. Serbia and Montenegro stamps had both Dinar and Euro currency on them.
        > > >
        > > > Is anybody here collecting vehicle license plates? They are also nice for geography/boundary enthusiasts.
        > > >
        > > > Alex
        > > >
        > > > --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "L. A. Nadybal" <lnadybal@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > On the surface it would seem to me you'd have an interest in maps on stamps and the theme of territorial disputes reflect in stamp designs.
        > > > > People also specialize in envelopes with evidence of postal wars - where a country blots out the stamp designs of other countries when they don't agree with what is pictured. The DDR (East Germany) did that a lot. For instance the US issued two stamps to honor Ernst Reuter as mayor of Berlin, in the US stamp series called "Champions of Liberty". The East Germans either returned all mail with those stamps affixed (stamping on them a note saying "violates government policy" or similar), or they took a marker or label and blotted it out or covered the stamp.
        > > > >
        > > > > Len
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "kubana2005" <kubana2005@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > One of the reasons why I stopped collecting stamps is because I didn't know what to specialize in. I found it rather hard just to drop a stamp if it doesn't fit in what I specialize.
        > > > > > What do you specialize in stamps collecting?
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Alex
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, Dallen Timothy <Dallen.Timothy@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > What Len is saying about the politics of stamps is why I collect stamps.
        > > > > > > Postage stamps are among the most revealing icons or symbols of
        > > > > > > nationalism and tell a great deal about sovereignty, the formation of
        > > > > > > states, overlapping jurisdictions, etc. The breakup of Yugoslavia can
        > > > > > > easily be tracked with postage stamps. Right after independence Slovenia
        > > > > > > issued stamps. The same goes with Croatia. However, in Bosnia and
        > > > > > > Herzegovina, there were several different issuing agencies, depending on
        > > > > > > one's ethnicity, or better yet, where one lived. So, during the
        > > > > > > mid-1990s there were Croatian stamps and Croatian Bosnian stamps. There
        > > > > > > were also official Bosnia Herzegovina Stamps, and there were also Srbska
        > > > > > > Republika stamps, and the list could go on. When a new country becomes
        > > > > > > independent, or declares independence, stamps are usually the first
        > > > > > > material objects (other than flags and border stations) they establish,
        > > > > > > because it demonstrates to the world their separateness. Stamps are very
        > > > > > > good evidence of border changes, sovereignty, etc.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Len also mentioned the fact that new countries usually allow the
        > > > > > > predecessor stamps to circulate for a while during transition periods.
        > > > > > > When the USSR dissolved, I was in the midst of corresponding with a guy
        > > > > > > from Turkmenistan. We wrote back and forth every few weeks. In the
        > > > > > > beginning, all of his stamps were USSR, then a few weeks after
        > > > > > > Turkmenistan's independence, the envelopes had a mix of USSR and
        > > > > > > Turkmenistan stamps. After about a year, his envelopes only had
        > > > > > > Turkmenistan stamps.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Dallen
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
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