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RE: [borderpoint] cars

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  • Barry Arnold
    Definately I saw cars previously registered in Belguim and Germany particularly being driven in Poland and Slovakia - number plate surround indicated the
    Message 1 of 21 , Jan 1, 2009
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      Definately I saw cars previously registered in Belguim and Germany particularly being driven in Poland and Slovakia - number plate surround indicated the original dealer. Also a lot of RHD cars in Slovakia I guess from the UK where their owners worked at some stage.

      To: borderpoint@yahoogroups.com
      From: lgm@...
      Date: Wed, 31 Dec 2008 15:05:59 -0600
      Subject: Re: [borderpoint] cars

      Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, Saab, and Volvo all do this.

      The cars are all US-specification.

      Lowell G. McManus
      Eagle Pass, Texas, USA

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Phil Lacefield Jr." <phil@lacefield. com>
      To: <borderpoint@ yahoogroups. com>
      Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2008 12:59 PM
      Subject: RE: [borderpoint] cars

      >> I'm not sure how feasible it is today, but it used to be very
      advantageous to fly to Europe, buy a Mercedes, BMW, or Volkswagen, drive it
      around Europe for a couple of weeks (crossing as many borders as possible of
      course) and then ship it back here to the US.

      Many marques still offer this service - in particular, Saab (I own five),
      who have done the IDS program for decades. Basically, you go to your local
      dealer here in the US, place your order, and Saab provides you with two
      airline tickets to Sweden. There you spend a night in a bed and breakfast
      near the Trollhattan plant and museum, spend the next day touring both, then
      you are presented with your car at an unveiling held inside the Saab
      Bilmuseum. You have to pay for temp tags and insurance for the duration of
      your stay in Europe, but once you do you're free to drive you (us-spec) car
      pretty much anywhere you like. There are several drop-off points on the
      continent; two locations offer free shipping back to your US dealer, the
      rest incur some additional fee. I've known many folks who have done the IDS
      program, and love it to death. It's my understanding that other marques,
      like BMW, do an almost identical thing, and have for ages.

      http://www.saab. com/global/ en/start# /buy-own/ sales/overview/ info/

      Phil

      ------------ --------- --------- ------

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    • kubana2005
      Here in Serbia, I have seen A LOT of cars that have US / Canadian license plates (mainly Ontario, New York, California and Florida). How much would it cost you
      Message 2 of 21 , Jan 2, 2009
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        Here in Serbia, I have seen A LOT of cars that have US / Canadian
        license plates (mainly Ontario, New York, California and Florida).
        How much would it cost you to ship your Canadian car into Europe?
        Perhaps that would be a better (and cheaper) option then renting a car
        in Albania?

        Kosovo borders are not safe to explore, but you can visit them along
        the roads. Kosovo/FYROM boundary has just been demacrated.
        Renting a Serbian car could help you visit North Kosovo, but I
        wouldn't recommend visiting Albanian areas of Kosovo with Serbian
        registered car. I have never seen an Albanian car in Serbia, but they
        are common in Montenegro and FYROM.
        Bare in mind that if drive Kosovo registered car you can not enter
        Serbia (and perhaps Ukraine and some other countries).

        Regards, Alex
      • L. A. Nadybal
        A lot of non-military sending state personnel under UN and other non-military auspices who are assigned to Europe are given logistical support which includes
        Message 3 of 21 , Jan 13, 2009
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          A lot of non-military sending state personnel under UN and other
          non-military auspices who are assigned to Europe are given logistical
          support which includes shipping of a car. It costs the US Govt about
          $1200 to ship a car for someone who is being assigned to Europe, using
          contract rates that are familiar to me. They go out of the US with US
          plates on them issued by the states where the deployed employees were
          last resident.

          Under military auspices, Status of Forces agreements usually provide
          for the owner to get sending state military issued license plates that
          receiving state governments allow the hosted forces to issue. That's
          why one sees (or used to see) plates inscribed "USA" (rather than
          being from a particular state of the US), or AFI (from Italian based
          US forces authorities), etc. Terrorist threats have caused the US
          forces to use plates that now are like host country plates (long and
          narrow rather than the little US-type), but with certain series numbers.

          Privately-owned vehicles shipped into the area of former Yugoslavia,
          which are used by people from the US assigned in Europe under
          non-military sponsorship can drive around using their US-plated cars
          as long as the hosting agreement doesn't make the employee a local
          resident, forcing them then to get local plates and pay local taxes.
          As diplomats or people under quasi-diplomatic exemption statuses, they
          are visitors on extended stays, and no not become residents.

          If the Americans sell their cars to others of the same status, the
          plates can go with the car, and, as long as the registration hasn't
          run out, no local police will generally bother the driver. If the car
          is sold to a local, then the local generally has to get local plates
          and turn in the foreign ones. Nowdays, many states offer on-line
          renewals of registrations, so owners don't need to physically go to a
          motor vehicle registration office to get new stickers to put on their
          plates - they go by mail to the employee's formal residence here in
          the US and family members mail then on. If a person is entitled to US
          Forces postal service support, like embassies and consulates often
          provide under agreements with the Dept of Defense, then these owners
          have APO New York addresses, and the government's postal service sends
          the mail on to the final destination in Europe at local US postage
          rates. These people don't need family forwarding services. The state
          issuing the license plate and renewal date stickers has no idea where
          the stickers sent to APO addresses actually go. They are happy to get
          the renewal fee and the owner in Europe is happy to not have to pay
          local taxes.

          This situation is often built on legal fictions in status of forces
          and other agreements, but is legal and it works. That's why you see
          so many US-plated cars in southern Europe now.

          Regards

          Len Nadybal
          Wash DC














          --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "kubana2005" <kubana2005@...> wrote:
          >
          > Here in Serbia, I have seen A LOT of cars that have US / Canadian
          > license plates (mainly Ontario, New York, California and Florida).
          > How much would it cost you to ship your Canadian car into Europe?
          > Perhaps that would be a better (and cheaper) option then renting a car
          > in Albania?
          >
          > Kosovo borders are not safe to explore, but you can visit them along
          > the roads. Kosovo/FYROM boundary has just been demacrated.
          > Renting a Serbian car could help you visit North Kosovo, but I
          > wouldn't recommend visiting Albanian areas of Kosovo with Serbian
          > registered car. I have never seen an Albanian car in Serbia, but they
          > are common in Montenegro and FYROM.
          > Bare in mind that if drive Kosovo registered car you can not enter
          > Serbia (and perhaps Ukraine and some other countries).
          >
          > Regards, Alex
          >
        • Lowell G. McManus
          When I used to live very near a large US Army base in Louisiana, it was common to see the sending-state military-issued license plates on vehicles of newly
          Message 4 of 21 , Jan 14, 2009
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            When I used to live very near a large US Army base in Louisiana, it was
            common to see the "sending-state military-issued license plates" on vehicles
            of newly returned soldiers who had not yet gotten American plates from their
            home states. As Len has said, they said "USA" from Germany, "AFI" from
            Italy, etc. The oddest one that I ever saw said "US Forces Azores." In
            more recent years, the US government started issuing "look-alike" plates to
            its forces in Germany. These mimicked the look of German plates, but had
            American details in the fine print. Since these fooled very few terrorists,
            US military personnel in Germany are now issued standard German plates with
            local markings, no different from those that a German citizen has on his
            vehicle. See the US Army's explanation at
            http://rmv.hqusareur.army.mil/ssgerlicplat.htm . These plates remain the
            property of the US Government, are removed from the vehicle before export,
            and are reassigned to another vehicle.

            Lowell G. McManus
            Eagle Pass, Texas, USA


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "L. A. Nadybal" <lnadybal@...>
            To: <borderpoint@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 2009 10:20 PM
            Subject: [borderpoint] Re: Kosovo etc. - why do you see so many US plated
            cars???


            >A lot of non-military sending state personnel under UN and other
            > non-military auspices who are assigned to Europe are given logistical
            > support which includes shipping of a car. It costs the US Govt about
            > $1200 to ship a car for someone who is being assigned to Europe, using
            > contract rates that are familiar to me. They go out of the US with US
            > plates on them issued by the states where the deployed employees were
            > last resident.
            >
            > Under military auspices, Status of Forces agreements usually provide
            > for the owner to get sending state military issued license plates that
            > receiving state governments allow the hosted forces to issue. That's
            > why one sees (or used to see) plates inscribed "USA" (rather than
            > being from a particular state of the US), or AFI (from Italian based
            > US forces authorities), etc. Terrorist threats have caused the US
            > forces to use plates that now are like host country plates (long and
            > narrow rather than the little US-type), but with certain series numbers.
            >
            > Privately-owned vehicles shipped into the area of former Yugoslavia,
            > which are used by people from the US assigned in Europe under
            > non-military sponsorship can drive around using their US-plated cars
            > as long as the hosting agreement doesn't make the employee a local
            > resident, forcing them then to get local plates and pay local taxes.
            > As diplomats or people under quasi-diplomatic exemption statuses, they
            > are visitors on extended stays, and no not become residents.
            >
            > If the Americans sell their cars to others of the same status, the
            > plates can go with the car, and, as long as the registration hasn't
            > run out, no local police will generally bother the driver. If the car
            > is sold to a local, then the local generally has to get local plates
            > and turn in the foreign ones. Nowdays, many states offer on-line
            > renewals of registrations, so owners don't need to physically go to a
            > motor vehicle registration office to get new stickers to put on their
            > plates - they go by mail to the employee's formal residence here in
            > the US and family members mail then on. If a person is entitled to US
            > Forces postal service support, like embassies and consulates often
            > provide under agreements with the Dept of Defense, then these owners
            > have APO New York addresses, and the government's postal service sends
            > the mail on to the final destination in Europe at local US postage
            > rates. These people don't need family forwarding services. The state
            > issuing the license plate and renewal date stickers has no idea where
            > the stickers sent to APO addresses actually go. They are happy to get
            > the renewal fee and the owner in Europe is happy to not have to pay
            > local taxes.
            >
            > This situation is often built on legal fictions in status of forces
            > and other agreements, but is legal and it works. That's why you see
            > so many US-plated cars in southern Europe now.
            >
            > Regards
            >
            > Len Nadybal
            > Wash DC
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "kubana2005" <kubana2005@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> Here in Serbia, I have seen A LOT of cars that have US / Canadian
            >> license plates (mainly Ontario, New York, California and Florida).
            >> How much would it cost you to ship your Canadian car into Europe?
            >> Perhaps that would be a better (and cheaper) option then renting a car
            >> in Albania?
            >>
            >> Kosovo borders are not safe to explore, but you can visit them along
            >> the roads. Kosovo/FYROM boundary has just been demacrated.
            >> Renting a Serbian car could help you visit North Kosovo, but I
            >> wouldn't recommend visiting Albanian areas of Kosovo with Serbian
            >> registered car. I have never seen an Albanian car in Serbia, but they
            >> are common in Montenegro and FYROM.
            >> Bare in mind that if drive Kosovo registered car you can not enter
            >> Serbia (and perhaps Ukraine and some other countries).
            >>
            >> Regards, Alex
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
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