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Re: SV: [borderpoint] Austria/Slovenia - border road blocked

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  • Anton Zeilinger
    Hi, since both Austria and Yugoslavia were non-alligned states and relations between the two countries were quite cordial, I don t think it was much of a
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 11, 2007
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      Hi,

      since both Austria and Yugoslavia were "non-alligned" states and
      relations between the two countries were quite cordial, I don't think
      it was much of a problem - plus the fact that the road is only really
      accessible from Austria meant that Yugoslavian border police were
      probably more or less able to ignore it.

      Similar to GDR territory on the western side of the wall in Berlin
      (up to a few meters)...

      Cheerio,

      Anton


      --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "Jesper Nielsen/Borderbase"
      <jesper@...> wrote:
      >
      > How did this road work during the cold war?
      >
      >
      >
      > Jesper
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > Fra: borderpoint@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:borderpoint@yahoogroups.com] PÃ¥ vegne af Anton Florian
      Zeilinger
      > Sendt: 8. juni 2007 11:22
      > Til: borderpoint@yahoogroups.com
      > Emne: [borderpoint] Austria/Slovenia - border road blocked
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > the Austrian daily "Der Standard" recently carried an item about a
      road that runs along the border:
      >
      >
      >
      > <http://derstandard.at/?url=/?id=2906602> http://derstandard.at/?
      url=/?id=2906602
      >
      >
      >
      > The gist of the story: One side of the road is in Austria, the
      other side is in Slovenia. The road is only accessible from Austria,
      i.e. it comes from Austria, touches the border for a few hundred
      meters and then turns back into Austria. The Slovenian side of the
      road is owned by a certain Mr. Zizek, who - alas - is a lawyer and
      found an interesting loophole: Apparently, after the dissolution of
      Yugoslavia, one "forgot" to enter the road into the catastral
      register of Slovenia - therefore. legally, there is no road on the
      Slovenian side. Mr Zizek has offered his side of the road to the
      Austrian government at the hefty price of € 1.000,-- per square
      meter. Since they did not react, he decided to block his side of the
      road, making it impossible for cars or busses to pass. Neither the
      Austrian nor the Slovenian police can do anything - the former,
      because it is outside Austrian territory, the latter because the
      whole action is legal since it is private property - at least prima
      facie. The provincial governor of Styria has already petitioned the
      Austrian Foreign Minister to interven with her Slovenian counterpart,
      but nothing has happened yet.
      >
      > In my opinion, the Austrian government could bring an action
      against this guy in the Slovenian court system - since the road has
      been there for a very long time, I could imagine that a servitude
      exists, that would have to be recognized.
      >
      >
      >
      > This seems to be the location:
      >
      >
      >
      > <http://www.austrianmap.at/tp.asp?s=12|172874|174708|0>
      http://www.austrianmap.at/tp.asp?s=12|172874|174708|0
      >
      >
      >
      > (You should be able to navigate around the area.)
      >
      >
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Anton
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > Make every IM count. Download Windows Live Messenger and join the
      i’m Initiative now. It’s free. Make
      <http://im.live.com/messenger/im/home/?source=TAGWL_June07> it count!
      >
    • MLeube@aol.com
      Hello, there are more examples of this type. In 1987 or so, I was with my parents on two places on the AUCZ-border (at that time: Austria - Czechoslovakia). *
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 12, 2007
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        Hello,
         
        there are more examples of this type. In 1987 or so, I was with my parents on two places on the AUCZ-border (at that time: Austria - Czechoslovakia).
         
        * Near Kittsee, Burgenland, Austria reaches close to the suburbs of Bratislava. I rode with my bike on a small paved road, one half of the road belonging to Czecholovakia. At one point, two or three Czech border guards were standing directly next to the road.
         
        * Near Retz, Lower Austria, I used a path directly on the border, which passed some border points on the Czech side.
         
        Another interesting border experience was the train from Deutschkreuz, Burgenland, to Wiener Neustadt. The train traveled through Hungary and even stopped in Sopron where passengers could leave the train. The other passengers were not checked, although one Hungarian border guard was on the train from just behind the border during the whole trip through hungary.
         
        By the way, did you know that there also was one West German railroad line crossing a few kilometers trough East Germany? This was the Bebra - Gerstungen - Eisenach line, used by the trains to Berlin and East Germany, but also by the local trains from Bebra to Obersuhl. They passed through East Germany near the village of Großensee.
         
        Greetings
        Matthias
      • Peter Tuffley
        ... Viewed on Google Earth, the shape of the old Thüringen-Hessen border in that area looks really weird -- like pincers surrounding Kleinensee on three
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 12, 2007
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          On 13/06/2007, at 5:51 AM, MLeube@... wrote:

           there also was one West German railroad line crossing a few kilometers trough East Germany? This was the Bebra - Gerstungen - Eisenach line, used by the trains to Berlin and East Germany, but also by the local trains from Bebra to Obersuhl. They passed through East Germany near the village of Großensee.
           

          Viewed on Google Earth, the shape of the old Thüringen-Hessen border in that area looks really weird -- like pincers surrounding Kleinensee on 
          three sides...

          Peter


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