Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Dubrovnik

Expand Messages
  • L. A. Nadybal
    I ve wondered that, too - because stamps used in Dubrovnik in the past were from an entity called Bosnia-Herzegovina . Even recently, during the separation
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 1 6:11 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      I've wondered that, too - because stamps used in Dubrovnik in the past
      were from an entity called "Bosnia-Herzegovina". Even recently,
      during the separation wars of the last twenty years, stamps reappeared
      with the name of an entity called "Herzeg-Bosna". The encyclopedia
      may have been only trying to shorten its text by giving
      Bosnia-Herzegovina a "nickname". I'll research this further -
      interesting that you brought it up.

      Len Nadybal

      --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "Jesper Nielsen/Borderbase"
      <jesper@...> wrote:
      >
      > I was just browsing through a 20 year old encyclopaedia. In the
      Yugoslavia
      > article was a picture of Dubrovnik and the text read it was in
      Herzegovina.
      >
      >
      >
      > Was the small Croatian fragment with Dubrovnik really part of
      Herzegovina
      > before the split, or did the article writer just make a mistake?
      (easy if
      > you look at the map).
      >
      >
      >
      > And does the fragment actually have a name?
      >
      >
      >
      > Jesper
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      >
      > Borderbase - your online guide to international borders and tripoints
      >
      > http://www.nicolette.dk/borderbase
      >
    • Christian Berghänel
      Ragusa/Dubrovnik has an interesting history. According to World Statesmen the area has been part of Croatia since at least 1944
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 1 8:35 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Ragusa/Dubrovnik has an interesting history. According to World Statesmen the area has been part of Croatia since at least 1944 (http://www.worldstatesmen.org/Croatia.html#Ragusa. Se also http://www.worldstatesmen.org/Croatia.html#Dalmatia). I remember from a summer holiday in 1982 in Yugoslavian Montenegro the family did a day-trip to Dubrovnik and that was in Croatia.

        Herceg-Bosna was a Croatian (?) republic set up 1991-1996 in Hercegovina with Mostar as capital. (History: http://www.worldstatesmen.org/Bosnia.html#Hercg-Bosna, map: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Former_Yugoslavia_wartime.png)

        ___
        Christian Berghänel


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "L. A. Nadybal" <lnadybal@...>
        To: <borderpoint@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2007 3:11 PM
        Subject: [borderpoint] Re: Dubrovnik


        > I've wondered that, too - because stamps used in Dubrovnik in the past
        > were from an entity called "Bosnia-Herzegovina". Even recently,
        > during the separation wars of the last twenty years, stamps reappeared
        > with the name of an entity called "Herzeg-Bosna". The encyclopedia
        > may have been only trying to shorten its text by giving
        > Bosnia-Herzegovina a "nickname". I'll research this further -
        > interesting that you brought it up.
        >
        > Len Nadybal
        >
        > --- In borderpoint@yahoogroups.com, "Jesper Nielsen/Borderbase"
        > <jesper@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > I was just browsing through a 20 year old encyclopaedia. In the
        > Yugoslavia
        > > article was a picture of Dubrovnik and the text read it was in
        > Herzegovina.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Was the small Croatian fragment with Dubrovnik really part of
        > Herzegovina
        > > before the split, or did the article writer just make a mistake?
        > (easy if
        > > you look at the map).
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > And does the fragment actually have a name?
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Jesper
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --
        > >
        > > Borderbase - your online guide to international borders and tripoints
        > >
        > > http://www.nicolette.dk/borderbase
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.