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More? digital info

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  • Barry A. Kintner
    Good day - -- I d be happy to post some information - give me an idea of what you might like to know. I ve written probably two dozen articles on various
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 1, 2004
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      Good day -
      -- I'd be happy to post some information - give me an idea of what you might like to know. I've written probably two dozen articles on
      various aspects of the digital world in the past couple of years. But those articles were for an industry group who are not artists. So I
      would break the subject down a bit differently. These articles range from selecting a computer, hardware, software, use, cameras, audio,
      and periferal issues.
      .
      -- The book Jill mentioned sounds very interesting - and is definitely directed at areas of interest to this group. I certainly will take a
      look at it when I get an opportunity.
      .
      -- Maxine's point is well taken. If you already have a darkroom - you get to experience traditional methods. In today's world I cannot
      imagine many people could set up a lab at home, or in any school. I know of insurance companies that will cancel a mortgage insurance
      policy if they find chemicals of any kind beyond household chemicals ( which is puzzling in light of the poisonous and explosive nature of
      some home chemical substances ) - this did happed to me ( my parents ). There was a visit by an insurance agent to the home - one day later
      a certified letter came cancelling the homeowners policy. Today that can cause the mortgage holder to call in the balance of a mortgage,
      leaving one to decide if you want insurance and a home or to keep the items in question. A cancellation of insurance happened a couple of
      months ago within a mile of my home and the owners actually had to leave and sell the property in their situation. Not good.
      -- A bonus for digital photography is the student is able to concentrate on composition and that all important first lesson of filling the
      frame with your subject. And not spending money on film and developing does allow us to look at many more photos than we might take if that
      cost is a factor either personally or in a class. Just don't use that 'delete' button as it is to easy to delete a photo that can teach you
      something.
      -- Kids are pretty much hard-wired for computer use, and getting people to 'see' is the challenge anyway. So the old challenge of getting
      the image you want is a focus of much teaching and not relying of software technique. All the old thoughts of what makes a good photograph
      are still present - no matter the final use.
      -- As for making the transition from 'analoge' to digital - there are many possiblilties. If you have film negatives or positives ( slides
      ) you can choose to have them scanned in professionally at very high resolution ( the studio's scanner scans at 4000 dpi for preparation of
      medium format film negatives to be printed in-house at up to 40" x 60" ) which can make for some extremely large image files. The largest
      in the studio that I am aware of was 900 meg - for one photo. This may not mean anything to you at this stage of learning - but trust
      me - this was large file. Great hardware and software is required to make the best use of it.
      -- If you are an artist / amateur / home user type - there are still a dizzying array of choices. You can get a home scanner of cheap to
      very expensive quality, several different kinds of software that will give you options, and some have hardware options too ( from scanning
      your own photographs, to film and negative scanning, to scanning 3d objects ).
      -- Actually the subject of scanning is an entire discipline in itself. Even inexpensive scanners can produce some very good images - the
      software is a key here - and they do last for a long time when taken care of. They are really simple devices.
      -- The book 'It Starts with a Scan' is a good place to begin. I've had mine for quite some time - and I am not sure if it is available in
      some updated / current version - but it is a good one and oft recommended.
      -- There are numerous sites on the internet with free tutorials too. Use the electronic world to continue the life of beloved handcrafts.
      .
      -- If anyone is interested, please give me some questions, or areas of interest, and I will attempt to answer them here. Remember - no one
      person is a computer expert - some just know more than others - temporarily. It is a field that is ever-changing and progressing. No one
      person will have all the answers you need ( or that I need ) - but I am happy to pass along what I do know - which just never seems to be
      enough.
      .

      Barry Kintner - a2z@... - Phoenix, Arizona
    • Pam Maines
      I have a question for anyone with experience dealing with preserving newspaper articles. I tend to photocopy anything I want to last, knowing how quickly
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 3, 2004
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        I have a question for anyone with experience dealing with preserving
        newspaper articles. I tend to photocopy anything I want to last,
        knowing how quickly newsprint yellows and falls apart. (I have
        plenty of old scrapbook items that fit that description.) However,
        my stepdaughter's fiance proposed to her by printing a "mock"
        engagement announcement on newsprint and inserting it in the Sunday
        paper and she wants to preserve the actual document for posterity.
        She's wondering whether laminating it is the best idea or whether
        there is another technique to maintain the newsprint "feel" without
        risking eventual disintegration. If any of you has a suggestion,
        we'd greatly appreciate it.

        Thanks!
        Pam
        --

        __________________________________________________

        Pam Maines
        pam@...
        805-964-6742
        __________________________________________________
      • Jill Littlewood
        The only way I know of to preserve newsprint is to deacidify it with Wei to or a similar buffering spray - Book Keeper is another one ( I have some so unless
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 3, 2004
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          The only way I know of to preserve newsprint is to deacidify it with Wei'to
          or a similar buffering spray - Book Keeper is another one ( I have some so
          unless you have a lot to spray just bring the piece by and we'll de-acidify
          it). Then it should be encapsulated in mylar with archival double sided
          tape keeping the mylar together. Or put it in one of the acid free pages
          Light Impressions sells - which they have at any good photo shop around town
          (the advantage of Light Impressions as well as other conservation suppliers
          is the wealth of information in their catalogues).

          With newsprint, or any other acidic paper, you can never reverse the aging
          from acid attack but you can arrest it with these buffering agents so it is
          good to do something as quickly as possible. The plastic protections are to
          avoid deterioration from handling since newsprint is not a strong paper.

          When you laminate anything you enclose it and trap the acid along with the
          paper - it will continue to decay but the plastic will support it as it
          weakens. It all depends on how conservation minded you want to be -
          conservators consider the best solutions to be reversable so they go for
          de-acidifying and enclosing in a reversable way, which laminating is not.

          Jill
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Pam Maines" <pam@...>
          To: <bookartsconnection@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, July 03, 2004 1:50 PM
          Subject: [bookartsconnection] Preserving newprint


          > I have a question for anyone with experience dealing with preserving
          > newspaper articles. I tend to photocopy anything I want to last,
          > knowing how quickly newsprint yellows and falls apart. (I have
          > plenty of old scrapbook items that fit that description.) However,
          > my stepdaughter's fiance proposed to her by printing a "mock"
          > engagement announcement on newsprint and inserting it in the Sunday
          > paper and she wants to preserve the actual document for posterity.
          > She's wondering whether laminating it is the best idea or whether
          > there is another technique to maintain the newsprint "feel" without
          > risking eventual disintegration. If any of you has a suggestion,
          > we'd greatly appreciate it.
          >
          > Thanks!
          > Pam
          > --
          >
          > __________________________________________________
          >
          > Pam Maines
          > pam@...
          > 805-964-6742
          > __________________________________________________
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • francesj14@cox.net
          I am not sure if this works for all news papers as they do vary. but I do have newspapers saved from 30 yrs ago by simply keeping them in a plastic bag with
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 4, 2004
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            I am not sure if this works for all news papers as they
            do vary. but I do have newspapers saved from 30 yrs
            ago by simply keeping them in a plastic bag with
            baking soda sprinkled within its pages, and in a trunk.

            They have not yellowed but they seem to be more gray
            but not crumpled or fragile. I think it is because they
            were kept in the dark away from any sunlight. I think no
            sunlight and baking soda powder is the key. The
            baking soda does keeps the acid in control. Of course
            making copies is always as added insurance and a
            good idea.

            I have enjoyed going back and reading the news along
            side the reason I saved the paper and remember how
            things were so different then.

            frances
            > From: Pam Maines <pam@...>
            > Date: 2004/07/03 Sat PM 04:50:03 EDT
            > To: bookartsconnection@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [bookartsconnection] Preserving newprint
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • monguio
            I remeber seeing a tip on that book that Pat had published with tips and resources. It involved soaking the newsprint in a solution of water and milk of
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 4, 2004
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              I remeber seeing a tip on that book that Pat had published with tips and
              resources. It involved soaking the newsprint in a solution of water and milk
              of magenesium, but I can't remeber proportions or times. Anyone? Patrice,
              are you still here in cyberspace?

              Ines
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Pam Maines" <pam@...>
              To: <bookartsconnection@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Saturday, July 03, 2004 13:50
              Subject: [bookartsconnection] Preserving newprint


              > I have a question for anyone with experience dealing with preserving
              > newspaper articles. I tend to photocopy anything I want to last,
              > knowing how quickly newsprint yellows and falls apart. (I have
              > plenty of old scrapbook items that fit that description.) However,
              > my stepdaughter's fiance proposed to her by printing a "mock"
              > engagement announcement on newsprint and inserting it in the Sunday
              > paper and she wants to preserve the actual document for posterity.
              > She's wondering whether laminating it is the best idea or whether
              > there is another technique to maintain the newsprint "feel" without
              > risking eventual disintegration. If any of you has a suggestion,
              > we'd greatly appreciate it.
              >
              > Thanks!
              > Pam
              > --
              >
              > __________________________________________________
              >
              > Pam Maines
              > pam@...
              > 805-964-6742
              > __________________________________________________
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • askengel@aol.com
              What ever happened to that book that Pat was putting together? I never saw it. Did it ever get finished? Sharon
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 4, 2004
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                What ever happened to that book that Pat was putting together?
                I never saw it. Did it ever get finished?
                Sharon
              • Pam Maines
                Thanks to those of you who responded to my request for ideas for preserving newsprint; I ve passed them along to my stepdaughter. Pam --
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 10, 2004
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                  Thanks to those of you who responded to my request for ideas for
                  preserving newsprint; I've passed them along to my stepdaughter.

                  Pam
                  --

                  __________________________________________________

                  Pam Maines
                  pam@...
                  805-964-6742
                  __________________________________________________
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