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  • Wade: The side and end decks would be a good thing. I've got flotation bags in bow and stern, and would deck and seal everything between the thwarts if I was going to do more work. Side decks would sure help the butt for hiking out in any wind. Hike you must. Side decks would give you significantly more heel room. My other use for the boat is for flyfishing and floating on the...
    mlawsontcnj Aug 20, 2010
  • Sorry I haven't been following the thread. I've been wondering about the lightweight glassed mat panels used for shell-over-frame walls and roof on semi-trailers. Probably only useful for S&G on a multi-chined hull. Also see http://www.gaboats.com/. Montfort uses aircraft dacron, heat-shrunk. This link also relevant to current threads on 'shoulder boats' and 'synthetic fabric hulls...
    Matthew Lawson Dec 8, 2008
  • Chris: I appreciate your concerns. Windsprint is really a very small boat. The pointy ends, though beautiful, make LOA deciptive, add no bouyancy, and constrain interior space. Before I built I strongly considered a stretched punt. After being out a few times, I wished I had done that or scaled the design to 18'. Oh well. I'm pleased overall. And she IS a beautiful boat. I have not...
    Matthew Lawson Apr 2, 2007
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  • To give Windsprint more freeboard means major changes in the layout of the side panels on the sheets of plywood, turning an incredibly materials-efficient design into a plywood hog (comparatively). If you are willing to do that, then you might think about other designs. Hiking out in a stiff breeze does a lot to retain freeboard, and if you have another body for ballast, you...
    Matthew Lawson Apr 1, 2007
  • --- In bolger@^$1, "Wesley Cox" wrote: > > I agree and I personally much prefer the aesthetics of a double ended boat. The very small difference in bouyancy in the stern might be signicant in terms of riding up and over a following sea. What I think is a more important difference than this, though, is when loading and unloading from a vehicle..... Wes: On cartopping a relatively...
    Matthew Lawson Jan 31, 2007
  • My two bits re: windsprint: I've had no problems with offset daggerboard, even running aground. I would not recommend lee board(s). I had the same concerns as Neil Sims about the balanced lug, and wanted to be able to stow all spars in the boat. Bolger says (paraphrase from memory, in 103 Small Boat Rigs) that the sprit sail with a sprit boom is the most powerful sail possible on...
    Matthew Lawson Sep 22, 2006
  • Ah, Joe, you are much more up on the Bio Bio than me. I quit rowing after blowing out my back in the early 1980s. I worked for OARS (http://www.oars.com/ --check out those dories!) and her international sister, Sobek (http://www.mtsobek.com/). Sobek isn't offering Bio Bio trips any more so you are probably right about the dams. Happens to the best of them. I would not want to...
    Matthew Lawson Feb 22, 2006
  • I think an outside chine log is going to be fastest to build. Much more so than the ½ round internal chine. How would you hold them in place while you get screws in and get it glued up? Look at Payson for how-to on external chines. No table saw required, just a circular saw, hand plane, nails, and glue. Real internal chines require precise modifications of the forms so the thing...
    Matthew Lawson Feb 21, 2006
  • If you've got an enclosed space, semi-inflated beach balls might be cheapest. Other ideas: army surplus weather baloons; mylar boxed wine liners (fun to acquire, great and leakproof as canteens too); blue foam dock flotation blocks (found one after recent Delaware river flooding: durable but easy to shape with hand saw). Doing things on the cheap takes time and if you have more...
    Matthew Lawson Jun 9, 2005
  • The thread reminds me of a question on materials I had the other day, driving the interstate. Semi-trailers are covered with what look to be 6'x8' or 6'x10' sheets of thin fiberglass, riveted to aluminum frames. Has anyone built with this stuff? I would think multiple chines and an internal frame would be the thing. RE: royalex, I browsed canoe sites the other night and paddled...
    Matthew Lawson Mar 26, 2005