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  • Stan Muller
    Hi All, Even though the Snow Goose isn t quite ready to get wet yet, I don t want to wait till the last moment to have everything ready for the big day.
    Message 1 of 26 , Jan 22, 2001
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      Hi All, Even though the Snow Goose isn't quite ready to get wet yet, I
      don't want to wait 'till the last moment to have everything ready for
      the big day.
      Sooooo.... The question is;
      What wine is proper for the Christening, of a non sailing, motorized
      Micro, red or white? (to bust over the bow, not to drink).
      Thanks for your help, Stan, Snow Goose
    • cml@tassie.net.au
      ... Well Stan, I am not in the position of being able to judge to what effect being a Micro affects things... But, unless you have a handy slave to tie to the
      Message 2 of 26 , Jan 23, 2001
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        Stan Muller wrote:
        > What wine is proper for the Christening, of a non sailing, motorized
        > Micro, red or white? (to bust over the bow, not to drink).

        Well Stan, I am not in the position of being able to judge to what
        effect being a Micro affects things...

        But, unless you have a handy slave to tie to the lunch ramp and then run
        the Micro over, splattering said slave's blood all over the bow and keel
        for good luck, I would recommend sticking to a 'full-bodied' Red as the
        nearest socially acceptable substitute... Using White would bring you
        bad luck... besides which it is only useful as paint stripper :)

        Cheers,
        Chris
      • Peter Lenihan
        Hello Stan, Well now,this is certainly one interesting question and speaks well of your optimism regarding an imminent launching of your Mighty Micro SNOW
        Message 3 of 26 , Jan 23, 2001
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          Hello Stan,
          Well now,this is certainly one interesting question and speaks
          well of your optimism regarding an imminent launching of your Mighty
          Micro SNOW GOOSE!
          The only proper way to attend to the christening of such a vessel
          is to indeed locate one worthy slave(a vestal virgin,perhaps!?) and
          allow her to cushion and grease the ways as the keel makes a run for
          the water while squirting"special blood" all over the boat.However,in
          this day and age,such manly shenanigans are highly frowned upon by
          nearly every segment of society and those charged with attempting to
          protect us from ourselves have legislated this as illegal.
          So that pretty much leaves us with the equally shameful act of
          heaving a bottle onto the prow,after invoking a few blessings from
          deities various,thanking understanding neighbors,spouse(s),in-
          laws,progeny and the fire department,only to observe bits of glass go
          flying all over the place,a potentially fine drink going to waste and
          perhaps some scratching of the vessel.
          The question of whether to use white or red wine hardly matters!
          As Chris mentioned,that white stuff approaches paint stripper and
          only a barbarian would willfully pass up a fine glass of red.
          However,you appear set on your course and despite advice to the
          contrary,wish to baptize her with wine.To that end,may I suggest the
          following:between now and the actual launch day,each time you are
          called upon to attend a social function where wine is served,wait
          around until the end and go about relieving the near empty bottles of
          their dregs.Not in your mouth(!)but rather into a container suitable
          for the task.Once a sufficient amount has been gathered to fill one
          normal wine bottle,transfer the gathered dregs into this bottle and
          cork it.Ideally,this will be a bottle from some grand and noble cru
          (vineyard) of France,whose label has not been picked off.This will
          undoubtedly impress the attendees of your launching when they spy the
          bottle resting on the small table set up beside the as yet launched
          SNOW GOOSE.You will be complemented on your impeccable taste!When the
          critical moment arrives,gently and with some ceremony,slide said
          bottle into a nylon stocking(I prefer black fine fishnet) and as the
          closing words are proclaimed,maintain a firm grip on the bottles'
          neck and let it strike the lower starboard side corner(if you are
          right handed!) about 1/3 from the bottles' bottom.The breaking glass
          will be contained by the stocking,the "wine" will run harmlessly onto
          the ground and only you will know that no good wine has been wasted!
          As an aside,the above mentioned concoction goes by the name
          of"PLONK" and was something of a favorite amongst old
          retired"seadogs" with salt for blood in the maritime city of
          St.John,New Brunswick."Plonk" may have been the sound of falling
          bodies as they hit the warf,in the fog,late at night.....
          Hope this helps,Stan,and best of luck!Don't forget to post
          pictures and give us all a full report!
          Sincerely,
          Peter Lenihan,sniffing corks,on the shores of the
          St.Lawrence........





          --- In bolger@egroups.com, Stan Muller <smuller@i...> wrote:
          > Hi All, Even though the Snow Goose isn't quite ready to get wet
          yet, I
          > don't want to wait 'till the last moment to have everything ready
          for
          > the big day.
          > Sooooo.... The question is;
          > What wine is proper for the Christening, of a non sailing, motorized
          > Micro, red or white? (to bust over the bow, not to drink).
          > Thanks for your help, Stan, Snow Goose
        • Peter Vanderwaart
          ... I think the important point is to make sure you don t leave broken glass underfoot at a launching ramp. - Peter
          Message 4 of 26 , Jan 23, 2001
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            > What wine is proper for the Christening, of a non sailing, motorized
            > Micro, red or white? (to bust over the bow, not to drink).

            I think the important point is to make sure you don't leave broken
            glass underfoot at a launching ramp. - Peter
          • Jim Goeckermann
            Thats s easy - for a sailboat...RIPPLE!! Jim (who suggests not breaking, but pouring it over the transom and crew...)
            Message 5 of 26 , Jan 23, 2001
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              Thats's easy - for a sailboat...RIPPLE!!
              Jim (who suggests not breaking, but pouring it over the transom and
              crew...)

              Peter Vanderwaart wrote:

              > > What wine is proper for the Christening, of a non sailing, motorized
              > > Micro, red or white? (to bust over the bow, not to drink).
              >
              > I think the important point is to make sure you don't leave broken
              > glass underfoot at a launching ramp. - Peter
              >
              > Bolger rules!!!
              > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, or spamming
              > - no flogging dead horses
              > - add something: take "thanks!" and "ditto!" posts off-list.
              > - stay on topic and punctuate
              > - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts
            • Stan Muller
              Thank you all, for the responses! Wow, waiting until it goes into the water, what a concept. We had planned the Christening for when we pulled her out of the
              Message 6 of 26 , Jan 23, 2001
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                Thank you all, for the responses!
                Wow, waiting until it goes into the water, what a concept. We had
                planned the Christening for when we pulled her out of the garage, and
                she first sees the light of day, her birth as it were. Being removed
                from her womb of construction.
                Since the consensus of opinion is red, we have it narrowed down to;
                Tiger Rose, Twister, or Mogen David 20% (you know, the stuff the kids
                call Mad Dog 20-20) Securely placed in an onion sack to catch the glass.
                (This is as close as us rednecks get to lace stockings) The wine choices
                are based on the best seller list from the major cities here in the
                midwest. Her hull still won't have paint on at this point, so I don't
                have to worry about the paint removable aspect of our wine choice. I
                plan to go, "PLONK" on the anchor while it is on the anchor ramp. It is
                a twenty pound navy, and is probably the only thing on the boat strong
                enough to break the bottle.
                As a side note, I'm just finishing the parallel arms upon which the
                Birdwatcher pilot house, top hatch will pivot up and out of the way, and
                have successfully completed one of the MJ type sponsons. It won't be
                long now, and out of the garage she will come.
                Thanks to all, Stan, Snow Goose.
              • Stan Muller
                Very, Very nice; With Peter s idea of filling a good wine bottle, and Paul Esterle s ceremony, people will not only think I have good taste, But think of me as
                Message 7 of 26 , Jan 23, 2001
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                  Very, Very nice; With Peter's idea of filling a good wine bottle, and
                  Paul Esterle's ceremony, people will not only think I have good taste,
                  But think of me as intelligent as well.
                  Stan, Snow Goose

                  PS; Paul, No, not in advertising, I just want to be able to write like
                  Peter L. when I grow up. ;-)
                • David Jost
                  Stan, What you need is a homemade wine for a homemade boat. I recently made 32 bottles of a homebrewed Cabernet. I spent months slaving over it. mixing the
                  Message 8 of 26 , Jan 23, 2001
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                    Stan,

                    What you need is a homemade wine for a homemade boat. I recently
                    made 32 bottles of a homebrewed Cabernet. I spent months slaving over
                    it. mixing the yeast, fermenting, cleaning, bottling, turning the
                    bottles every 20 days, keeping them in a cool place. I treated the
                    batch of bottles like babies.
                    A month ago, I opened the first of many bottles to see how the
                    finished product was. . . In one word "terrible". It had great body, a
                    dirt flavor, an offensive nose, and a digustingly long aftertaste.
                    There was no food to offer it a compliment, just an insult.
                    I sent it to a friend of mine who is a highly respected vintner and
                    he tried to "fix" it. In turn, he sent it off to some labs. They
                    still could not fix it. It was completely and utterly undrinkable.
                    This concoction was slaved over, loved, caressed, and treated like
                    a new child; yet, it still was just plain awful. The only thing it
                    was good for would be "Christening a ship".
                    You would have a very expensive, well loved wine. That serves no
                    purpose other than that of love. Poisiden may have been offended
                    however. It is not nice to mess with the Gods of the sea. . .
                    Fortunately, my wife made me dump the whole mess with the promise
                    that she would let me try again. Unlike boatbuilding, you cannot
                    cover up your mistakes in winemaking. Bad juice is bad juice.

                    My advise. . . .Get some fresh Vermont cheddar cheese, fresh
                    apples, and a bagette of bread. Compliment them with nice 1998 (98 was
                    a good year for Santa Barbara Valley Wines)cabernet from the Santa
                    Barbara area of California served in proper glasses, stemmed, not too
                    wide at the top, filled only half way or less. Have a picnic in the
                    cockpit of your new boat, and toast your first mate (wife or labrador
                    retriever, your pick)! "Accidentally", spill a drop or two in the
                    motor well where it can be neatly washed off into a happy waiting sea.
                    No Gods would be offended by the charity you have shown, and the
                    respect you have given to a proper wine.

                    > Very, Very nice; With Peter's idea of filling a good wine bottle,
                    and
                    > Paul Esterle's ceremony, people will not only think I have good
                    taste,
                    > But think of me as intelligent as well.
                    > Stan, Snow Goose
                    >
                    > PS; Paul, No, not in advertising, I just want to be able to write
                    like
                    > Peter L. when I grow up. ;-)
                  • David Jost
                    Stan, Perhaps you can cut a deal with Pippo to locate a nice bottle of Sangiovese from the Tuscany region of Italy! Now we are talking!
                    Message 9 of 26 , Jan 23, 2001
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                      Stan,
                      Perhaps you can cut a deal with Pippo to locate a nice bottle of
                      Sangiovese from the Tuscany region of Italy! Now we are talking!
                    • David Ryan
                      Stan -- My long suffering wife and chief financier nearly choked on her tongue from laughing as I read the below passage aloud to her. I thank you for amusing
                      Message 10 of 26 , Jan 23, 2001
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                        Stan --

                        My long suffering wife and chief financier nearly choked on her
                        tongue from laughing as I read the below passage aloud to her.

                        I thank you for amusing her, but dial it back a bit. Without her, no epoxy!

                        YIBB,

                        David


                        > What you need is a homemade wine for a homemade boat. I recently
                        >made 32 bottles of a homebrewed Cabernet. I spent months slaving over
                        >it. mixing the yeast, fermenting, cleaning, bottling, turning the
                        >bottles every 20 days, keeping them in a cool place. I treated the
                        >batch of bottles like babies.
                        > A month ago, I opened the first of many bottles to see how the
                        >finished product was. . . In one word "terrible". It had great body, a
                        >dirt flavor, an offensive nose, and a digustingly long aftertaste.
                        >There was no food to offer it a compliment, just an insult.
                        > I sent it to a friend of mine who is a highly respected vintner and
                        >he tried to "fix" it. In turn, he sent it off to some labs. They
                        >still could not fix it. It was completely and utterly undrinkable.
                        > This concoction was slaved over, loved, caressed, and treated like
                        >a new child; yet, it still was just plain awful. The only thing it
                        >was good for would be "Christening a ship".
                        > You would have a very expensive, well loved wine. That serves no
                        >purpose other than that of love. Poisiden may have been offended
                        >however. It is not nice to mess with the Gods of the sea. . .
                        > Fortunately, my wife made me dump the whole mess with the promise
                        >that she would let me try again. Unlike boatbuilding, you cannot
                        >cover up your mistakes in winemaking. Bad juice is bad juice.
                        >
                        > My advise. . . .Get some fresh Vermont cheddar cheese, fresh
                        >apples, and a bagette of bread. Compliment them with nice 1998 (98 was
                        >a good year for Santa Barbara Valley Wines)cabernet from the Santa
                        >Barbara area of California served in proper glasses, stemmed, not too
                        >wide at the top, filled only half way or less. Have a picnic in the
                        >cockpit of your new boat, and toast your first mate (wife or labrador
                        >retriever, your pick)! "Accidentally", spill a drop or two in the
                        >motor well where it can be neatly washed off into a happy waiting sea.
                        > No Gods would be offended by the charity you have shown, and the
                        >respect you have given to a proper wine.
                        >
                        >> Very, Very nice; With Peter's idea of filling a good wine bottle,
                        >and
                        >> Paul Esterle's ceremony, people will not only think I have good
                        >taste,
                        >> But think of me as intelligent as well.
                        >> Stan, Snow Goose
                        >>
                        >> PS; Paul, No, not in advertising, I just want to be able to write
                        >like
                        >> Peter L. when I grow up. ;-)
                        >
                        >
                        >Bolger rules!!!
                        >- no cursing, flaming, trolling, or spamming
                        >- no flogging dead horses
                        >- add something: take "thanks!" and "ditto!" posts off-list.
                        >- stay on topic and punctuate
                        >- add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts


                        CRUMBLING EMPIRE PRODUCTIONS
                        134 W.26th St. 12th Floor
                        New York, NY 10001
                        (212) 243-1636
                      • Peter Lenihan
                        Stan, Sounds like what you really need at this point is more akin to a planking party whereby the crew gets to relieve a bit of tension after the final shutter
                        Message 11 of 26 , Jan 23, 2001
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                          Stan,
                          Sounds like what you really need at this point is more akin to a
                          planking party whereby the crew gets to relieve a bit of tension
                          after the final shutter plank is driven home.
                          The christening can only happen moments before she embraces her
                          element......
                          So gather up a nice selection of pungent cheeses,a variety of
                          dark breads,two or three old Port wines,perhaps a good sherry or two
                          and invite some friends over to admire your efforts.By the time the
                          last cheer is sent up and the bottles emptied you will have perhaps
                          managed to get yourself a fine finishing crew to assist with the
                          myriad details to finish her up just right!!!
                          I'd stay away from any beverage that sounds like it was distilled
                          from Aqua Velva Aftershave.........
                          Sincerely,
                          Peter Lenihan,feeling the nervous twitchings of Spring as the
                          thermometer hovers around 0 Celsius,on the shores of the mild
                          St.Lawrence...........








                          --- In bolger@egroups.com, Stan Muller <smuller@i...> wrote:
                          > Thank you all, for the responses!
                          > Wow, waiting until it goes into the water, what a concept. We had
                          > planned the Christening for when we pulled her out of the garage,
                          and
                          > she first sees the light of day, her birth as it were. Being removed
                          > from her womb of construction.
                          > Since the consensus of opinion is red, we have it narrowed down
                          to;
                          > Tiger Rose, Twister, or Mogen David 20% (you know, the stuff the
                          kids
                          > call Mad Dog 20-20) >
                        • Peter Lenihan
                          David, Great idea!But Stan may not have enough time to properly age his homemade wine,with Spring just around the corner....Sorry to read that the Cabernet
                          Message 12 of 26 , Jan 24, 2001
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                            David,
                            Great idea!But Stan may not have enough time to properly age his
                            homemade wine,with Spring just around the corner....Sorry to read
                            that the Cabernet batch was lost!Shame.Did you ever figure out why
                            the wine turned?I remember helping a friend make wine and a few
                            things were critical for success.1)After all the grapes were
                            pressed,the juice was stored in one 45 gal.barrel with an airlock,in
                            the dark.2)After two full lunar cycles,we then decanted the contents
                            into demijans(sp?) which also have airlocks.3)all subsequent
                            decantings were undertaken only after the"bubblings"in the airlocks
                            had pretty much ceased.4)At no time must the containers be manhandled
                            roughly.5)beware of the full moon!6)Women who are menstruating must
                            never,NEVER,be in the same room as the wine while decanting or
                            fermenting!
                            At any rate,after 11 months we had ourselves some of the best red
                            wine I have ever had the pleasure of becoming acquainted with.We
                            called it the"talking wine" since you could consume this wholesome
                            beverage all evening long and just go on talking 'till sunrise.Three
                            types of grapes were used and never a hang-over was felt!
                            I have often wondered why Bolger choose Burgundy for a boats' name.
                            Sincerely,
                            Peter Lenihan






                            --- In bolger@egroups.com, "David Jost" <djost@m...> wrote:
                            > Stan,
                            >
                            > What you need is a homemade wine for a homemade boat. I
                            recently
                            > made 32 bottles of a homebrewed Cabernet. I spent months slaving
                            over
                            > it. mixing the yeast, fermenting, cleaning, bottling, turning the
                            > bottles every 20 days, keeping them in a cool place. I treated the
                            > batch of bottles like babies.
                            > A month ago, I opened the first of many bottles to see how the
                            > finished product was. . . In one word "terrible
                          • Paul A. Lefebvre, Jr.
                            I must say, all this talk of launchings, virgins, etc. has me going! I m now moving rapidly toward becoming a Micro builder. 2 weekends ago David Jost was kind
                            Message 13 of 26 , Jan 24, 2001
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                              I must say, all this talk of launchings, virgins, etc. has me going! I'm now
                              moving rapidly toward becoming a Micro builder. 2 weekends ago David Jost
                              was kind enough to invite me and my wife up to see his Micro 'Firefly' in
                              progress, and satisfy our curiosity over just how big a 15-footer could
                              really be; I was impressed enough with the spaciousness of the boat that I
                              sent away for my plans last week, and they arrived last night! Signed by PCB
                              himself, along with a handwritten letter explaining a few changes - taller
                              main mast and sail, and he now recommends a 1/2" thick bottom as well. I've
                              really got the itch now, and am going to order my sail kit as soon as
                              Sailrite gets back to me about the modifications to the rig. Thanks to Dave
                              and everyone else who has helped me get this far.

                              So given the recent thread, I'm wondering if I should start a batch of
                              homemade wine as well, so it'll be ready in time for the hoped-for
                              early-summer launch. Used to make wine in High School, before my friends and
                              I could legally buy it... as I remember it wasn't bad, though back then we
                              didn't really care much how it tasted. Amazing the variety of things you can
                              make wine out of, too..... A buddy of mine and I also made a still that
                              produced some pretty nasty stuff! it'd probably be real good for cleaning up
                              epoxy, but I wouldn't want to splash that all over my new boat! Take the
                              paint right off.... Wouldn't do the local waters any good either.....

                              Paul Lefebvre
                            • Peter Lenihan
                              Hi Paul Lefebvre, Glad to read that you will soon enter into the realm of the truly blessed MICROLOGISTs.Congradulations!!! I am,however,somewhat confused
                              Message 14 of 26 , Jan 25, 2001
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                                Hi Paul Lefebvre,
                                Glad to read that you will soon enter into the realm of the
                                "truly blessed" MICROLOGISTs.Congradulations!!!
                                I am,however,somewhat confused with your estimated launching
                                date,"early summer"?!Is that 2001 or 2002?If 2001,I'll send you a
                                bottle of some really delicious stuff,fresh,from France to sooth your
                                vocal chords from all the shouting you'll be doing keeping your
                                building crew very very busy meeting your deadline!;-D
                                Then we can all meet in mid-summer on Lake Champlain for a nifty
                                BOLGER MESSABOUT........think of the fun!!!!!!!
                                Good luck with your MICRO and you can be assured of lots of free
                                advice right here on this forum!!
                                Sincerely,
                                Peter Lenihan,dreaming of Lake Champlain,while wide awake on the
                                shores of the frozen St.Lawrence.........






                                >
                                > So given the recent thread, I'm wondering if I should start a batch
                                of
                                > homemade wine as well, so it'll be ready in time for the hoped-for
                                > early-summer launch.
                                >
                                > Paul Lefebvre
                              • Eric Schoonover
                                Dear Stan: I won t dare touch this matter of blood, and virgins, and white and red wine with my five-foot gaff (though painted Interlux Vermilion RED), but I
                                Message 15 of 26 , Jan 25, 2001
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                                  Dear Stan:

                                  I won't dare touch this matter of blood, and virgins, and white and
                                  red wine with my five-foot gaff (though painted Interlux Vermilion
                                  RED), but I do think that you must christen your vessel in some
                                  ceremonial manner; that is, whatever constitutes ceremony in your
                                  mind.

                                  I did NOT christen my Micro before setting sail. I did incur, as a
                                  result, the wrath of many gods, and there was no Athena lurking in
                                  the anchor well ready to bear a hand. My first mistake, THE grand
                                  mistake,was to set forth on a brief solo-sail after launching, on a
                                  sea trial of sorts. But no christening! All went well. The wind, my
                                  log notes,was from the north-east. (The First Warning.) My second
                                  mistake,after THE GRAND MISTAKE was that of inviting too many people
                                  to sail with me on the virginal voyage, to be held on the day after
                                  sea trials: Six adults, one small child. (The small child slept below
                                  most of the day.) They would help christen the boat and make it a
                                  festive, celebratory day. My daughter, the only woman, was to perform
                                  the rites. I had carefully typed out the words of appeasement to the
                                  gods together with a nod of acknowledgement to the boat's namesake.
                                  But we didn't do it. All these years later I can't remember why we
                                  didn't do it. (Senescence setting in, perhaps even then.)

                                  Well, we were off, pushed down the great salt pond by my very small,
                                  1.5 Seagull motor--and a fine breeze. The wind was still out of the
                                  north-east (The Second Warning, Part 1) and was considerably more
                                  blustery than the day before (The Second Warning, Part 2). But it was
                                  bright, unlimited visibility, cool: a lovely early September day in
                                  southern New England. We sailed, the small boy slept, we ate lunch at
                                  anchor, and snoozed in the dazzling sun in that wonderful Micro
                                  cockpit, or on the cabin top, or down below.

                                  Suddenly, fully aware that the breeze had become a 20-knot wind, I
                                  thought it best to up anchor and head back. Six adults and a child
                                  are, after all, some responsibility. I might add that none of the
                                  guests had any sailing experience, and as if to prove that point, one
                                  of them asked, "What bitter end?" And there went my brand-new Bruce
                                  anchor! (Intimations of the wrath to come? Or was this another part
                                  of the Warning? Or part of The Punishment?)

                                  We got under way. Gosh, it was wild and wooly: spray leapt, the mast
                                  creaked in the partners, items came adrift below, and the dacron
                                  rattled and cracked when we came about. The child slept, wedged in by
                                  PFD's piled against the bunkboards. I had yet to install the
                                  clinometers, so I don't know the angle of heel. I placed the hefty
                                  guests well to the windward side. But the helm had much more weather
                                  than I remembered from the day before. How strange, I thought. And
                                  then, bang, the rudder's post broke. More accurately, it split from
                                  the top; and the bronze bolt and the bronze strapping came free and .
                                  . . and, we had no steerageway!

                                  I lowered the Seagull into the water. "Dad, that thing's from World
                                  War I," and it was, or so it looked and acted. Its flywheel was
                                  exposed (beard snatcher), the starter rope had to be re-threaded each
                                  time one cranked and often whipped your knuckles, and it started,
                                  could only start, in gear. This particular Seagull would always start
                                  when cold. Always. When hot or even warm, it was a brute. I yanked,
                                  and yanked, and, nervous, over primed, and flooded, and . . . . But
                                  eventually it started.

                                  It had to push pretty hard to take all of us back, and motoring a
                                  Micro against a strong breeze is fairly demanding. My guests were
                                  unfazed by all of this (Oh for innocence!), and the child had woken
                                  to the sound of the motor and was happily standing in the bunk looking
                                  at the world through the porthole. We made at best 1 kt.

                                  And then the dock. I felt that I should kneel and kiss the
                                  pressure-treated boards. "Dad, aren't we going to have the
                                  christening?" Oh, yes. The christening. And we did, and she read the
                                  lines and broke a bottle of properly-netted champagne that a
                                  well-wisher had given me many years before when I started building
                                  the boat, I think it was that phony stuff that you can buy in the
                                  marine discount stores, yet it fizzed and foamed, and we all declared
                                  it a fine day. Well, they did. Two days later I bought a 3.5 Tohatsu
                                  motor that has pushed the Micro ever since and, I might add, through
                                  strong tides at ¼ throttle. It starts in neutral. I still have the
                                  Seagull,but I don't take six adults and child for a sail anymore,
                                  even if the wind comes soft.

                                  Thus, I recommend that you not procrastinate as I. That before even
                                  the smallest amount of water touches the keel, or whatever, that your
                                  vessel be well-christened. I wish you the very best in your voyages
                                  and may the gods look with favor upon your work. Oh yes, I easily
                                  fixed the split post with an epoxy slurry and hose clamps. To appease
                                  the gods, I painted THAT Vermilion Red.


                                  Eric Schoonover
                                  Wakefield, RI
                                  eric@...
                                • Peter Lenihan
                                  There you go Stan and fellow Micrologists!, Some fine first class témoignage from Eric.Bravo Eric!!Alot to be learnt from carefully reading his account of
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Jan 25, 2001
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                                    There you go Stan and fellow Micrologists!,
                                    Some fine first class témoignage from Eric.Bravo Eric!!Alot to be
                                    learnt from carefully reading his account of adventure!!!
                                    Sure sounded like fun to me,especially since no real harm came to
                                    the crew,only the owners pride........perhaps.
                                    Sincerely,
                                    Peter Lenihan,enjoyed the story Eric and glad I did the"right
                                    thing",on the shores of the St.Lawrence................







                                    --- In bolger@egroups.com, "Eric Schoonover" <eric@u...> wrote:
                                    > Dear Stan:
                                    >
                                    > I won't dare touch this matter of blood, and virgins, and white and
                                    > red wine with my five-foot gaff (though painted Interlux Vermilion
                                    > RED), but I do think that you must christen your vessel in some
                                    > ceremonial manner; that is, whatever constitutes ceremony in your
                                    > mind.
                                    >
                                    > I did NOT christen my Micro before setting sail. I did incur, as a
                                    > result, the wrath of many gods, and there was no Athena lurking in
                                    > the anchor well ready to bear a hand. My first mistake, THE grand
                                    > mistake,was to set forth on a brief solo-sail after launching, on a
                                    > sea trial of sorts. But no christening! All went well. The wind, my
                                    > log notes,was from the north-east. (The First Warning.) My second
                                    > mistake,after THE GRAND MISTAKE was that of inviting too many people
                                    > to sail with me on the virginal voyage, to be held on the day after
                                    > sea trials: Six adults, one small child. (The small child slept
                                    below
                                    > most of the day.) They would help christen the boat and make it a
                                    > festive, celebratory day. My daughter, the only woman, was to
                                    perform
                                    > the rites. I had carefully typed out the words of appeasement to the
                                    > gods together with a nod of acknowledgement to the boat's namesake.
                                    > But we didn't do it. All these years later I can't remember why we
                                    > didn't do it. (Senescence setting in, perhaps even then.)
                                    >
                                    > Well, we were off, pushed down the great salt pond by my very
                                    small,
                                    > 1.5 Seagull motor--and a fine breeze. The wind was still out of the
                                    > north-east (The Second Warning, Part 1) and was considerably more
                                    > blustery than the day before (The Second Warning, Part 2). But it
                                    was
                                    > bright, unlimited visibility, cool: a lovely early September day in
                                    > southern New England. We sailed, the small boy slept, we ate lunch
                                    at
                                    > anchor, and snoozed in the dazzling sun in that wonderful Micro
                                    > cockpit, or on the cabin top, or down below.
                                    >
                                    > Suddenly, fully aware that the breeze had become a 20-knot wind, I
                                    > thought it best to up anchor and head back. Six adults and a child
                                    > are, after all, some responsibility. I might add that none of the
                                    > guests had any sailing experience, and as if to prove that point,
                                    one
                                    > of them asked, "What bitter end?" And there went my brand-new Bruce
                                    > anchor! (Intimations of the wrath to come? Or was this another part
                                    > of the Warning? Or part of The Punishment?)
                                    >
                                    > We got under way. Gosh, it was wild and wooly: spray leapt, the mast
                                    > creaked in the partners, items came adrift below, and the dacron
                                    > rattled and cracked when we came about. The child slept, wedged in
                                    by
                                    > PFD's piled against the bunkboards. I had yet to install the
                                    > clinometers, so I don't know the angle of heel. I placed the hefty
                                    > guests well to the windward side. But the helm had much more weather
                                    > than I remembered from the day before. How strange, I thought. And
                                    > then, bang, the rudder's post broke. More accurately, it split from
                                    > the top; and the bronze bolt and the bronze strapping came free and
                                    .
                                    > . . and, we had no steerageway!
                                    >
                                    > I lowered the Seagull into the water. "Dad, that thing's from World
                                    > War I," and it was, or so it looked and acted. Its flywheel was
                                    > exposed (beard snatcher), the starter rope had to be re-threaded
                                    each
                                    > time one cranked and often whipped your knuckles, and it started,
                                    > could only start, in gear. This particular Seagull would always
                                    start
                                    > when cold. Always. When hot or even warm, it was a brute. I yanked,
                                    > and yanked, and, nervous, over primed, and flooded, and . . . . But
                                    > eventually it started.
                                    >
                                    > It had to push pretty hard to take all of us back, and motoring a
                                    > Micro against a strong breeze is fairly demanding. My guests were
                                    > unfazed by all of this (Oh for innocence!), and the child had woken
                                    > to the sound of the motor and was happily standing in the bunk
                                    looking
                                    > at the world through the porthole. We made at best 1 kt.
                                    >
                                    > And then the dock. I felt that I should kneel and kiss the
                                    > pressure-treated boards. "Dad, aren't we going to have the
                                    > christening?" Oh, yes. The christening. And we did, and she read the
                                    > lines and broke a bottle of properly-netted champagne that a
                                    > well-wisher had given me many years before when I started building
                                    > the boat, I think it was that phony stuff that you can buy in the
                                    > marine discount stores, yet it fizzed and foamed, and we all
                                    declared
                                    > it a fine day. Well, they did. Two days later I bought a 3.5 Tohatsu
                                    > motor that has pushed the Micro ever since and, I might add, through
                                    > strong tides at ¼ throttle. It starts in neutral. I still have the
                                    > Seagull,but I don't take six adults and child for a sail anymore,
                                    > even if the wind comes soft.
                                    >
                                    > Thus, I recommend that you not procrastinate as I. That before even
                                    > the smallest amount of water touches the keel, or whatever, that
                                    your
                                    > vessel be well-christened. I wish you the very best in your voyages
                                    > and may the gods look with favor upon your work. Oh yes, I easily
                                    > fixed the split post with an epoxy slurry and hose clamps. To
                                    appease
                                    > the gods, I painted THAT Vermilion Red.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Eric Schoonover
                                    > Wakefield, RI
                                    > eric@u...
                                  • Paul A. Lefebvre, Jr.
                                    Yes Peter, I really am (perhaps naively) hoping to launch sometime this summer, 2001. Your suggestion a few weeks back of the messabout on Champlain really got
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Jan 25, 2001
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                                      Yes Peter, I really am (perhaps naively) hoping to launch sometime this
                                      summer, 2001. Your suggestion a few weeks back of the messabout on Champlain
                                      really got me fired up - I'd love to go and meet you and the others there,
                                      and sail my new Micro in the company of other Micros! I also haven't seen
                                      Lake Champlain since I was about 6 years old, and have long dreamed of going
                                      back, so it'd be a great way to inaugurate the boat. If I don't get my Micro
                                      done, I may go anyway, bring photos of the Micro in progress and a
                                      non-Bolger boat just to meet you guys, see some Bolger boats in action and
                                      get my batteries recharged, as they'll no doubt need it by then. But
                                      wouldn't it be great if, after all this talk of launchings, I could launch
                                      my Micro at the Champlain messabout! We could all drink some recycled
                                      homegrown wine and you could teach me how to sail it! Never sailed with a
                                      mizzen before...

                                      I realize it's gonna be a push, but in the past have gotten quite obsessive
                                      when boatbuilding, having put 3 18' strip kayaks in the water, two of them
                                      in 2 months/300 hours each. The third took longer due to logistical
                                      problems, but was eventually finished in the 4' wide hallway of a rented
                                      house. That was all a few years ago, I lived alone, didn't own a television;
                                      I'm a bit mellower now, sometimes I even manage to sit through an hour-long
                                      TV program (Junkyard Wars!!!). But if reports of Micro building time hold
                                      true (most I've heard so far is 600 hours, CSB's propaganda says
                                      150(absurd!)-300!), a July launch seems at least conceivable, if not
                                      practical. Time (and money!) will tell. Also, I've already learned a
                                      tremendous amount from this forum, received lots of advice and
                                      encouragement, and seen the excellent documentation like your Duckworks
                                      articles, so the path looks pretty clear, and most of the hard thinking has
                                      been done for me. The kayaks were built largely in a vacuum, nobody I knew
                                      had ever seen a strip kayak, there were no books or even designs available
                                      then as there are now, so I had to draw and (learn how to) loft them, and
                                      work out all construction details and techniques for myself, in unheated
                                      rented space using borrowed tools. I am now well equipped with tools and the
                                      collective wisdom of this group, and have a very nice heated workspace;
                                      together with the ingenious, proven design and clear blueprints in hand, I'm
                                      optimistic that this will go very nicely.

                                      I'm aware of the 'rule of 5's of boatbuilding', and I won't mind eating some
                                      humble pie if I show up at Champlain without a Micro in tow, but I'm going
                                      to go for it. Listen to me, Stan, I already sound like a MICROHOLIC! ;-]

                                      Paul Lefebvre
                                    • Stan Muller
                                      Eric, Does the term, nor-easter ring a bell? My Granddaddy warned me about them, and we were in upstate New York! ;-) Your story was fantastic, and as Peter
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Jan 25, 2001
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                                        Eric,
                                        Does the term, "nor-easter" ring a bell? My Granddaddy warned me
                                        about them, and we were in upstate New York! ;-) Your story was
                                        fantastic, and as Peter said, there is much to learn from it. I imagine
                                        it gave you a early start toward trusting the sea worthiness of the
                                        Micro design.
                                        The only experience I have had, on that level, was about 40 + years
                                        ago when a buddy of mine talked me in to going with him from Staten
                                        Island, out to the first channel marker (N.Y.C. harbor), then around the
                                        Ship with the light on it that marked the outer channel beginning. All
                                        in an 11 Foot Penguin, during the last throws of a passing hurricane. We
                                        did make it back, and landed about 6 miles from where we wanted to be,
                                        and felt darned fortunate that we made it back at all. It is stories
                                        like yours that make this list such fun to read.

                                        Peter,
                                        After reading Eric's adventures, you can bet your bippy that I WILL
                                        have a ceremony with none of the gods left out! I'm going to cover all
                                        the bases.

                                        Paul,
                                        Welcome to the ranks of the Micro minded! Best of luck on your due
                                        date, Work hard, stick with the plans, and it can be done. Not by me,
                                        but it can be done.

                                        Eric U.,
                                        A while back I bought a pair of tail lights for my boat trailer. They
                                        were military surplus and water proof, but when I got them home and took
                                        them apart they didn't have bulbs in them, they were clusters of LED's
                                        In the shape of an arrow for the turn signals and a triangle cluster for
                                        the running lights. All behind red lenses. There are six wires going
                                        into each light housing, and I have no idea what voltage they were set
                                        up for. I haven't looked at them for a while, but I think there were
                                        about 18 to 20 LED's in each assembly. How would I check them out, and
                                        are these the kind that I can use for lights on my boat? Any thoughts
                                        will be appreciated. Anyone on the list have any experience with these?
                                        Best to all, Stan, Snow Goose
                                      • Peter Lenihan
                                        Hello Paul, I admire your determination and wish you every success!Yes,it would be just grand if you were to launch your new MICRO at the LAKE CHAMPLAIN BOLGER
                                        Message 19 of 26 , Jan 25, 2001
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                                          Hello Paul,
                                          I admire your determination and wish you every success!Yes,it
                                          would be just grand if you were to launch your new MICRO at the LAKE
                                          CHAMPLAIN BOLGER MESSABOUT.....then we could perhaps have a pot-luck
                                          type christening whereby everyone brings a sampling(bottle) of their
                                          favorite beverage and dribbles a dram on her stem!!
                                          I'll gladly take you out and share what I know about handling the
                                          MICRO even if you do not show up with your MICRO.Afew hours on the
                                          lake will re-charge your batteries and give you all the drive needed
                                          to finish her up!
                                          Sincerely,
                                          Peter Lenihan,with happy visions of fun times this summer,somewhat
                                          South of the shore of the St.Lawrence.............






                                          --- In bolger@egroups.com, "Paul A. Lefebvre, Jr." <paul@w...> wrote:
                                          > Yes Peter, I really am (perhaps naively) hoping to launch sometime
                                          this
                                          > summer, 2001. Your suggestion a few weeks back of the messabout on
                                          Champlain
                                          > really got me fired up - I'd love to go and meet you and the others
                                          there,
                                          > and sail my new Micro in the company of other Micros! I also haven't
                                          seen
                                          > Lake Champlain since I was about 6 years old, and have long dreamed
                                          of going
                                          > back, so it'd be a great way to inaugurate the boat. If I don't get
                                          my Micro
                                          > done, I may go anyway, bring photos of the Micro in progress and a
                                          > non-Bolger boat just to meet you guys, see some Bolger boats in
                                          action and
                                          > get my batteries recharged, as they'll no doubt need it by then. But
                                          > wouldn't it be great if, after all this talk of launchings, I could
                                          launch
                                          > my Micro at the Champlain messabout! We could all drink some
                                          recycled
                                          > homegrown wine and you could teach me how to sail it! Never sailed
                                          with a
                                          > mizzen before...
                                          >
                                        • Tom
                                          While I (somewhat) patiently (OK, not really) wait for a response to either my FAX or my email to Susanne about plans, maybe some of you could continue my
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Mar 29, 2010
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                                            While I (somewhat) patiently (OK, not really) wait for a response to either my FAX or my email to Susanne about plans, maybe some of you could continue my education.
                                            Micro plans - what do you get? Does one set cover all Micro variations including Long Micro, or is each a separate set of plans?
                                            Has anyone successfully ordered a set recently to know what the price is?
                                            Micro vs. Long Micro: LM should be faster due to its oversized sail plan and inherently greater hull speed, but can anyone quantify this (actual, not theoretical)?
                                            What are the approximate interior dimensions of both the Micro and LM (L, W, H) and also cockpit dimensions (L, W).
                                            Would it be practical to build an enclosed head (porta pottie in an enclosed space with door or curtain) in the LM and still have berths for 2, or a single berth for 2? Berth(s) would not have to be longitudinal as far as I am concerned, although I am guessing the interior hull width is marginal for a berth arranged athwart. Diagonal? I'd like to do a full size cardboard mock up to help understand the options and get a feel for the space.
                                            I prefer the appearance of the Micro, but the larger accommodations for cruising, speed, and tabernacle mast of the LM are also appealing. Marginally modern accommodations (privacy) are required if my wife is to join me I am afraid.
                                            TIA for any information and opinions.
                                            Tom
                                          • loyseal1
                                            Tom, This may not answer all your questions regarding the two boats, but I think it will help as it is a portion of a letter from Phil Bolger himself when I
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Mar 30, 2010
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                                              Tom,
                                              This may not answer all your questions regarding the two boats, but I think it will help as it is a portion of a letter from Phil Bolger himself when I wrote to him a few years ago. I will quote the last two paragraphs.

                                              "Costs and time vary so wildly that it is useless to give figures, according to builder's details and circumstances. Long Micro is about 50% heavier than Micro with 532 lbs of ballast to 412, for instance. That would be a fair reflection of relative material cost. The difference in labor time would be much less as all the operations are the same.

                                              In our opinion, and what we hear from owners, Long Micro is the better value for the investment in money and effort. They are powerful good sailors."

                                              Sincerely,
                                              Phil Bolger

                                              I hope this helps.
                                              Loy

                                              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomoll@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > While I (somewhat) patiently (OK, not really) wait for a response to either my FAX or my email to Susanne about plans, maybe some of you could continue my education.
                                              > Micro plans - what do you get? Does one set cover all Micro variations including Long Micro, or is each a separate set of plans?
                                              > Has anyone successfully ordered a set recently to know what the price is?
                                              > Micro vs. Long Micro: LM should be faster due to its oversized sail plan and inherently greater hull speed, but can anyone quantify this (actual, not theoretical)?
                                              > What are the approximate interior dimensions of both the Micro and LM (L, W, H) and also cockpit dimensions (L, W).
                                              > Would it be practical to build an enclosed head (porta pottie in an enclosed space with door or curtain) in the LM and still have berths for 2, or a single berth for 2? Berth(s) would not have to be longitudinal as far as I am concerned, although I am guessing the interior hull width is marginal for a berth arranged athwart. Diagonal? I'd like to do a full size cardboard mock up to help understand the options and get a feel for the space.
                                              > I prefer the appearance of the Micro, but the larger accommodations for cruising, speed, and tabernacle mast of the LM are also appealing. Marginally modern accommodations (privacy) are required if my wife is to join me I am afraid.
                                              > TIA for any information and opinions.
                                              > Tom
                                              >
                                            • William
                                              Tom, I m overseas and cannot look at my Long Micro (LM) blueprints or measure my boat. But here s a short answer to some issues: Micro and LM plans are
                                              Message 22 of 26 , Apr 1, 2010
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                                                Tom,
                                                I'm overseas and cannot look at my Long Micro (LM) blueprints or measure my boat. But here's a short answer to some issues:

                                                Micro and LM plans are separate. I think you need to stipulate that you want the micro upgrade. The variants of the micro, and the plans, have been discussed here before. I wasn't paying attention.

                                                I have never sailed on a micro before. Bruce Hallman has sailed his micro navigator around the San Fran area and might have some hard data on his boat's performance. He has a great quote about sailing past some expensive plastic sloop while they frantically try to adjust sails to forestall the humiliation of defeat by Bolger box.

                                                My LM is faster than her hull speed would indicate, and methinks that's the same with the micro. My LM will effortlessly cruise well into the low 6 knot range. On a good beam run or a run she'll easily stay solidly in the mid 6 knot range, and I've had her hit 7.2 knots on the knot meter (in Lake Erie, without a current or tide). My GPS tracklogs indicate the same speeds up to 7 knots. These shapries are fast off the wind and easily exceed their predicted hull speed. But for my boat, 7.0-7.2 knots seems to be a "speed limit" of sorts. You'll hit that speed for brief spurts, but generally drop back down into the high 6's.

                                                I can give you the exact dimensions later (if you want) for the LM, but off the cuff, the cabin is 8 feet long, 6 feet wide (at the max beam), and about 4-4.5 feet (? guessing here) tall at the max beam. IF you were to install a private place for a head, it should go at the aft end of the cabin. There is not sufficient head room in the bow-area for to sit on the throne, unless you installed a pop-top or something. You might install a small head to one side, and slide the bunk over to make one big bunk along the center-line. It's not an easy modification. The other option is to partially slide both bunks aft, under the bridge-deck/cockpit (as the micro does), and then build a head up in the bow-end of the cabin. If you and your wife are under 6 feet tall, athwartship berths might work, but they would need to be near the stern-end of the cabin for max length, and the stern-end of the cabin is where the max head room is. None of these are simple or elegant solutions, but the head plays an important role in some sailor's lives and SWMBO must be obeyed.

                                                Cockpit is 6 feet long- maybe a bit more (maybe 6.5 feet long), and
                                                6 feet wide at max beam. It's a very roomy cockpit and I've had four
                                                people all sitting on one side as we bashed into Lake Erie with the full main up on a day far too windy to not be reefed. Big fun.

                                                Hope this helps. These boats are a lot of fun and open paths to new adventures.

                                                Bill, in Texas now.
                                                Long Micro Pugnacious

                                                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomoll@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > While I (somewhat) patiently (OK, not really) wait for a response to either my FAX or my email to Susanne about plans, maybe some of you could continue my education.
                                                > Micro plans - what do you get? Does one set cover all Micro variations including Long Micro, or is each a separate set of plans?
                                                > Has anyone successfully ordered a set recently to know what the price is?
                                                > Micro vs. Long Micro: LM should be faster due to its oversized sail plan and inherently greater hull speed, but can anyone quantify this (actual, not theoretical)?
                                                > What are the approximate interior dimensions of both the Micro and LM (L, W, H) and also cockpit dimensions (L, W).
                                                > Would it be practical to build an enclosed head (porta pottie in an enclosed space with door or curtain) in the LM and still have berths for 2, or a single berth for 2? Berth(s) would not have to be longitudinal as far as I am concerned, although I am guessing the interior hull width is marginal for a berth arranged athwart. Diagonal? I'd like to do a full size cardboard mock up to help understand the options and get a feel for the space.
                                                > I prefer the appearance of the Micro, but the larger accommodations for cruising, speed, and tabernacle mast of the LM are also appealing. Marginally modern accommodations (privacy) are required if my wife is to join me I am afraid.
                                                > TIA for any information and opinions.
                                                > Tom
                                                >
                                              • Tom
                                                Bill and Loy, Thanks for your responses, information, and suggestions - it all helps a great deal to put things in perspective. I suspected that significant
                                                Message 23 of 26 , Apr 2, 2010
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                                                  Bill and Loy,
                                                  Thanks for your responses, information, and suggestions - it all helps a great deal to put things in perspective. I suspected that significant interior layout modifications would be a challenge, but I am encouraged by what I am hearing none the less. An aft end of cabin head sounds very possible. Bill, when you are able, some actual interior dimensions (measured or from the plans) would really be appreciated - no hurry - whenever it is convenient for you. By the way Bill, I really enjoyed your videos on YouTube - great stuff - please post some more when you can!! Where do you sail in TX?
                                                  Thanks again,
                                                  Tom
                                                • Bruce Hallman
                                                  ... The Micro Mod has reworked the forward bulkhead (Sta#12) to include an opening hatch to the wet anchor well , and a port-a-potty could be kept there with
                                                  Message 24 of 26 , Apr 2, 2010
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                                                    > Would it be practical to build an enclosed head (porta pottie

                                                    The Micro Mod has reworked the forward bulkhead (Sta#12) to include an
                                                    opening hatch to the "wet anchor well", and a port-a-potty could be
                                                    kept there with the anchor, plus I think a curtain could be easily
                                                    fitted giving a reasonable degree or privacy for your wife :).

                                                    Pretty astonishing that a 15'4' long boat can sleep two inside a cabin
                                                    plus have a separate space for a port-a-potty stowage outside the
                                                    cabin.

                                                    I recall that the Bolger4 yahoo group has scans for the upgrade sheet...

                                                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger4/files/MICRO%20NAVIGATOR/
                                                  • Tom
                                                    Bruce, If I can take the liberty of totally fictionalizing and exagerating a previous post of yours just for the fun of it (well, it could be true, right?): I
                                                    Message 25 of 26 , Apr 2, 2010
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                                                      Bruce,
                                                      If I can take the liberty of totally fictionalizing and exagerating a previous post of yours just for the fun of it (well, it could be true, right?):

                                                      "I recall sitting in the bow anchor well, casually taking a dump on the porta pottie with the Micro trimmed up and sailing herself with the empty helm lashed down, sailing on a reach across
                                                      the San Francisco waterfront, and waving to the crew of a 30+ foot
                                                      Beneteau sloop dressed in foul weather gear go into panic mode
                                                      tweaking their sails, spinnaker pole, and more to avoid being passed
                                                      by a boxy looking backyard built 16 footer"

                                                      Now THAT paints a picture!!! Thanks for your ideas.
                                                      Tom

                                                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <hallman@...> wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      > > Would it be practical to build an enclosed head (porta pottie
                                                      >
                                                      > The Micro Mod has reworked the forward bulkhead (Sta#12) to include an
                                                      > opening hatch to the "wet anchor well", and a port-a-potty could be
                                                      > kept there with the anchor, plus I think a curtain could be easily
                                                      > fitted giving a reasonable degree or privacy for your wife :).
                                                      >
                                                      > Pretty astonishing that a 15'4' long boat can sleep two inside a cabin
                                                      > plus have a separate space for a port-a-potty stowage outside the
                                                      > cabin.
                                                      >
                                                      > I recall that the Bolger4 yahoo group has scans for the upgrade sheet...
                                                      >
                                                      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger4/files/MICRO%20NAVIGATOR/
                                                      >
                                                    • William
                                                      Tom, Back in the states. Point your browser here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/hallman/4032944720/sizes/l/ You ll see a scale drawing of an LM with a scale.
                                                      Message 26 of 26 , Apr 14, 2010
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                                                        Tom,
                                                        Back in the states. Point your browser here:
                                                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/hallman/4032944720/sizes/l/
                                                        You'll see a scale drawing of an LM with a scale. You can use a ruler or sheet of paper to measure the dimensions of the LM interior. Even better, you can see how things would look if you moved things around. I saw one person (Pryor, in Australia) who slid the berths forward and created galley space in the aft end of the cabin. I would consider sliding the berths aft (maybe 3 feet, maybe more), under the cockpit, and using the free space in the bow-end of the cabin for a private head/galley. Just check for sufficient head room. Anywho, the drawing will give you plenty of time to tinker around.

                                                        I haven't sailed in TX since arriving last summer (I live a little north of Houston). I'm still weighing the benefits of putting-in at Clear Lake on Galveston Bay, or just plopping into Lake Conroe. Probably won't make a decision until later in the summer. I'm hoping to take the LM up to Lake Huron for some sailing this summer.

                                                        Bill, Long Micro Pugnacious

                                                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomoll@...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > Bill and Loy,
                                                        > Thanks for your responses, information, and suggestions - it all helps a great deal to put things in perspective. I suspected that significant interior layout modifications would be a challenge, but I am encouraged by what I am hearing none the less. An aft end of cabin head sounds very possible. Bill, when you are able, some actual interior dimensions (measured or from the plans) would really be appreciated - no hurry - whenever it is convenient for you. By the way Bill, I really enjoyed your videos on YouTube - great stuff - please post some more when you can!! Where do you sail in TX?
                                                        > Thanks again,
                                                        > Tom
                                                        >
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