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Block question

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  • MA Farrell, G Blankenship
    The design of the lifting keel for my rebuilding project calls for a rather hefty block (for the lifting wire) that s proving hard to find. Nothing has been
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 3, 2001
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      The design of the lifting keel for my rebuilding project calls for a
      rather hefty block (for the lifting wire) that's proving hard to
      find. Nothing has been located that looks like the drawing, which
      resembles a masthead turning block and I think a conventional block
      shackled to a stout padeye would do. But after pouring over catalogs,
      the right block as remained elusive -- except with a price tag of
      $200 or more, and I've built entire boats for less. Here's what's
      needed: A rather large block with a 3-inch or so sheave. The sheave
      probably should be metal and probably should also be grooved for 1/4-
      inch wire. The working (not breaking) strength should be around a
      ton. If the block comes with its own baseplate, it should take at
      least 1/4-inch bolts.

      Any thoughts/suggestions? Many thanks for any help!

      Gary Blankenship
      Tallahassee, FL, where it's not only too cold to epoxy, it's too cold
      to paint!
    • Rick
      - I m not sure if what I have is what you re looking for, but a few years ago my neighbor gave me a pair of (new) all steel blocks on their own base. I think
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 3, 2001
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        - I'm not sure if what I have is what you're looking for, but a few
        years ago my neighbor gave me a pair of (new) all steel blocks on
        their own base. I think they are originally for the steering cables
        of old outboards. Very hefty, I'm guessing they are drilled for a pair
        of 3/8" mounting bolts. If you think one might work, let me know and
        I'll scan a photo to you. You can have one if you pay the shipping.

        Rick


        -- In bolger@egroups.com, "MA Farrell, G Blankenship " <gbship@i...>
        wrote:
        > The design of the lifting keel for my rebuilding project calls for
        a
        > rather hefty block (for the lifting wire) that's proving hard to
        > find. Nothing has been located that looks like the drawing, which
        > resembles a masthead turning block and I think a conventional block
        > shackled to a stout padeye would do. But after pouring over
        catalogs,
        > the right block as remained elusive -- except with a price tag of
        > $200 or more, and I've built entire boats for less. Here's what's
        > needed: A rather large block with a 3-inch or so sheave. The sheave
        > probably should be metal and probably should also be grooved for
        1/4-
        > inch wire. The working (not breaking) strength should be around a
        > ton. If the block comes with its own baseplate, it should take at
        > least 1/4-inch bolts.
        >
        > Any thoughts/suggestions? Many thanks for any help!
        >
        > Gary Blankenship
        > Tallahassee, FL, where it's not only too cold to epoxy, it's too
        cold
        > to paint!
      • Lincoln Ross
        That seems like a lot of stress on the wire! Do they have wire with a working load that high? I get, very roughly, somewhere above 40,000 psi, not accounting
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 4, 2001
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          That seems like a lot of stress on the wire! Do they have wire with a
          working load that high? I get, very roughly, somewhere above 40,000
          psi, not accounting for the spaces between the strands. Don't know,
          but I should think working load would be reduced in an application
          where you move the wire over a block under load.
          --- In bolger@egroups.com, "MA Farrell, G Blankenship " <gbship@i...>
          wrote:
          snip probably should be metal and probably should also be grooved for
          1/4-
          > inch wire. The working (not breaking) strength should be around a
          > ton. snip
          > Any thoughts/suggestions? Many thanks for any help!
          >
          > Gary Blankenship
          > Tallahassee, FL, where it's not only too cold to epoxy, it's too
          cold
          > to paint!
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