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[bolger] Re: Circular saw

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  • Richard Barnes
    Hello, If you are right handed buy a circular saw with the blade on the left side. That makes it easy to see the cut line. Porter Cable makes a really nice
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 8, 1999
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      Hello,
      If you are right handed buy a circular saw with the blade on the left
      side. That makes it easy to see the cut line. Porter Cable makes a really
      nice one with a 6" blade , called the Saw Boss (Model 345PC). It should
      sell for about the same as the Black and Decker. They also make a 7 1/4"
      model , but I can't find the model #. These saws weigh very little because
      they use some magnesium parts. The thickness of the plywood isn't a
      problem if you use a good thin kerf blade with sharp carbide teeth. You may
      want 20 or more teeth to reduce chip out, but taping the cut line will help
      also.

      I taught shop for many years and found the B&D equipment did not hold up
      to our constant use by beginners as well as Makita, Bosch, Porter Cable and
      lately Dewalt.

      Good luck,
      Richard


      > Dear all - I'm willing to buy an hand held circular saw (any
      > boatbuilding book recommends it as one of the best tools) but I can't
      > decide which one to choose. I've located a nice Black and Decker (all
      > metal construction) direct drive sidewinder with a 9" diameter blade,
      > rip fence and bevel scale, which sells for the equivalent of 120 US$.
      > For 100 $ I could buy a Bosch with a significantly smaller blade (40 mm
      > = 1.5" cut depth max). I doubt that any of those would be really good
      > in cutting plywood with respect to my jigsaw.
      > while cutting. My impression is that a big circular saw would be ok to
      > deal with straight cuts on thick stock, but cutting thin plywood would
      > need a very small circular saw (say, 3" or 4" dia. blade). Any
      > thoughts? Thanks - Pippo
      >
      >
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    • KF4call@aol.com
      Hello Pippo and all; I think that if one wants to scarph 1/4 inch ply, than a full size blade will be needed. I seem to recall the blade will have to be over
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 8, 1999
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        Hello Pippo and all;
        I think that if one wants to scarph 1/4 inch ply, than a full size blade
        will be needed. I seem to recall the blade will have to be over 7". I am
        looking at battery powered circular saws with much smaller blades, the
        smallest being about 3 1/2" (Craftsman) with 5" also being available
        (DeWalt) and I wonder if the small blade size will result in better ability
        to easily cut the curvature of (for example) the sheer line in the 1/4 or 6mm
        ply that is so often called for in Bolger designed boats. The DeWalt is full
        featured, the Craftsman does not have adjustable angle cutting. Regards,
        Warren
      • GHC
        Pippo, Here s what I do: Buy a saw with a big blade and the deepest depth you can get, and spend a little bit on a high-quality carbide with a good set to the
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 8, 1999
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          Pippo,

          Here's what I do: Buy a saw with a big blade and the deepest depth you can
          get, and spend a little bit on a high-quality carbide with a good set to
          the teeth. I wouldn't try fighting with a thin veneer blade. As with a
          table saw, set the blade just past the thickness of the material - about
          1/8"/4 mm. The set of the teeth will cut a kerf plenty wide for any boat
          building radius I've seen. (On 1/4" material, with a good blade, you can
          just about spin the saw in place.)

          I've used the battery-powered 3-4" saws. Just like you think, the power is
          marginal and short-lived, and the blades are very thin to conserve power
          reaulting in no kerf to work your saw in. And, the limited depth is an
          annoyance any time you want to cut lumber.

          You'll get a much better part than by jig saw. By the way, I use a Dewalt;
          a great saw, generally better than the B&D. But, they're ALL good...

          Gregg


          At 01:55 AM 8/8/99 -0700, you wrote:
          >Dear all - I'm willing to buy an hand held circular saw (any
          >boatbuilding book recommends it as one of the best tools) but I can't
          >decide which one to choose. I've located a nice Black and Decker (all
          >metal construction) direct drive sidewinder with a 9" diameter blade,
          >rip fence and bevel scale, which sells for the equivalent of 120 US$.
          >For 100 $ I could buy a Bosch with a significantly smaller blade (40 mm
          >= 1.5" cut depth max). I doubt that any of those would be really good
          >in cutting plywood with respect to my jigsaw. True, it gives somehow
          >wobbly edges, but it is much lighter and it's easy to look at the blade
          >while cutting. My impression is that a big circular saw would be ok to
          >deal with straight cuts on thick stock, but cutting thin plywood would
          >need a very small circular saw (say, 3" or 4" dia. blade). Any
          >thoughts? Thanks - Pippo
          >
          >
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        • Foster Price
          Hello Pippo and Group I use a 7 1/4 inch saw to do 90% of my plywood cutting, even the curves. Two mistakes I made for a long time were to use a jigsaw
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 8, 1999
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            Hello Pippo and Group

            I use a 7 1/4 inch saw to do 90% of my plywood cutting, even the curves. Two mistakes I made for a long time were to use a jigsaw (wobbly lines) and to try and cut to the line (always, always cut outside the line and shave the last bit off with a plane or spokeshave for inside curves). I set my skilsaw to the minimum depth necesary to penetrate the ply as this allows tighter curves to be followed.

            Regards - Foster

            ----------
            From: pippobianco@...
            Sent: Sunday, 8 August 1999 8:55 pm
            To: bolger@egroups.com
            Subject: [bolger] Circular saw

            Dear all - I'm willing to buy an hand held circular saw (any
            boatbuilding book recommends it as one of the best tools) but I can't
            decide which one to choose. I've located a nice Black and Decker (all
            metal construction) direct drive sidewinder with a 9" diameter blade,
            rip fence and bevel scale, which sells for the equivalent of 120 US$.
            For 100 $ I could buy a Bosch with a significantly smaller blade (40 mm
            = 1.5" cut depth max). I doubt that any of those would be really good
            in cutting plywood with respect to my jigsaw. True, it gives somehow
            wobbly edges, but it is much lighter and it's easy to look at the blade
            while cutting. My impression is that a big circular saw would be ok to
            deal with straight cuts on thick stock, but cutting thin plywood would
            need a very small circular saw (say, 3" or 4" dia. blade). Any
            thoughts? Thanks - Pippo


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          • Jim Conlin
            By far the most common size of circular saw here is 7-1/4 blade. These cut plywood very well and can cut gentle curves. Use a blade intended for plywood
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 9, 1999
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              By far the most common size of circular saw here is 7-1/4" blade. These cut
              plywood very well and can cut gentle curves. Use a blade intended for
              plywood (many teeth) and set the depth of cut so that the blade protrudes
              through the plywood by no more than 1/4".
              There are smaller saws intended for plywood and trim work, but they'd be no
              good at all for heavier work.

              pippobianco@... wrote:

              > Dear all - I'm willing to buy an hand held circular saw (any
              > boatbuilding book recommends it as one of the best tools) but I can't
              > decide which one to choose. I've located a nice Black and Decker (all
              > metal construction) direct drive sidewinder with a 9" diameter blade,
              > rip fence and bevel scale, which sells for the equivalent of 120 US$.
              > For 100 $ I could buy a Bosch with a significantly smaller blade (40 mm
              > = 1.5" cut depth max). I doubt that any of those would be really good
              > in cutting plywood with respect to my jigsaw. True, it gives somehow
              > wobbly edges, but it is much lighter and it's easy to look at the blade
              > while cutting. My impression is that a big circular saw would be ok to
              > deal with straight cuts on thick stock, but cutting thin plywood would
              > need a very small circular saw (say, 3" or 4" dia. blade). Any
              > thoughts? Thanks - Pippo
              >
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > Click Here to apply for a NextCard Internet Visa and start earning
              > FREE travel in HALF the time with the NextCard Rew@rds Program.
              > http://clickhere.egroups.com/click/449
              >
              > eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger
              > http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
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