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Re: System Three LPU Paints?

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  • jboatguy@cs.com
    Yea, I like the Sys 3 book too. Their techniques work well. When I finally got around to trying their method for trowling on prethickened epoxy, I was amazed
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 6, 2000
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      Yea, I like the Sys 3 book too. Their techniques work well. When I
      finally got around to trying their method for trowling on
      prethickened epoxy, I was amazed at how well it worked (after a few
      trials). I finished my Cartoppers bright, and needed a good 'fairing
      compound'. The very beginning, and very end, of the nearly hull
      length trowel run on each panel was a sticky, gooey mess!, but that
      long middle section was close to perfect--thin, smooth, and pre-
      faired with little sanding needed. And the messy ends were easily
      dealt with by letting the epoxy dry to the plastic stage, and going
      at it with a sharp hand plane.

      John



      --- In bolger@egroups.com, Glen Gibson <glen@i...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Does anyone have any experience with the water reduceable LPU
      paints put out
      > by System Three? They would appear to be a great solution to
      painting my
      > Micro, although not cheap. I'm willing to pay a little more for a
      great
      > finish, and simple water cleanup. Any help appreciated.
      >
      > Also, System Three put their catalog and great epoxy book (although
      I ended
      > up using Raka epoxy for my Micro, the System Three epoxy book is
      great, and
      > really helps in learning to work with this stuff) up on their web
      site,
      > check out
      >
      > http://www.systemthree.com/index.html
      >
      > and go to the literature section. Good reading, especially if
      you've never
      > worked with epoxy before, or only in small amounts.
      >
      > I'm going to order the paint trial kit ($11) and do some tests,
      I'll report
      > back what I find.
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Glen
    • Orr, Jamie
      I haven t used water reducible LPU, but I ve used the toxic variety, also very thin, so here s my two bits. I found that rolling it on with a foam roller the
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 6, 2000
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        I haven't used water reducible LPU, but I've used the toxic variety, also
        very thin, so here's my two bits. I found that rolling it on with a foam
        roller the tipping it with a foam or polyester brush worked very well. I've
        had several positive comments on the finish.

        Cover only a small area with each roller load, and brush it immediately -- I
        found that an area about 2' x 2' or just slightly more was the maximum I
        could cover and brush before the paint started to tack -- I had about 20
        seconds working time, and tried never to take a second stroke with the brush
        over the same area. Also watch for drips, and roll/brush back over the wet
        edge to eliminate a hard line.

        Even for small corners and areas, a small 3" roller followed by the brush
        will get into corners, and make a better job than using a brush alone.

        LPU is costly and fussy, though -- I don't know for sure what I'd use if I
        was to do it over. You want a warm, dust free environment. At the very
        least, warm the paint to the recommended temperature so it flows properly.

        Jamie Orr

        -----Original Message-----
        From: jboatguy@... [mailto:jboatguy@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, December 06, 2000 9:32 AM
        To: bolger@egroups.com
        Subject: [bolger] Re: System Three LPU Paints?


        They haven't worked for me, brushing them.

        They clean up great, very, very easy, and that's good, because I had
        to put on a lot of coats. They are easy to work with. After adding
        the hardener it won't dry for several days in the pot, maybe more I
        don't know, but it dries quickly once spread. But my experience is
        they are thin, don't brush well, don't cover well, and multiple coats
        don't help. I bought the red. I used 4 or more coats on my
        waterline stripe, over a couple coats of pristinely prepared clear
        epoxy, and you can still *easily* see wood grain through the red.

        My advice, if you are going to use it make sure your surface is
        primed, sanded, and pristine--and then spray. But I would think that
        if you let your epoxy throughly dry, say 2 weeks, more in winter, you
        could put pretty much anything over it, so why bother with LPU?

        John

        --- In bolger@egroups.com, Glen Gibson <glen@i...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Does anyone have any experience with the water reduceable LPU
        paints put out
        > by System Three? They would appear to be a great solution to
        painting my
        > Micro, although not cheap. I'm willing to pay a little more for a
        great
        > finish, and simple water cleanup. Any help appreciated.
        >
        > Also, System Three put their catalog and great epoxy book (although
        I ended
        > up using Raka epoxy for my Micro, the System Three epoxy book is
        great, and
        > really helps in learning to work with this stuff) up on their web
        site,
        > check out
        >
        > http://www.systemthree.com/index.html
        >
        > and go to the literature section. Good reading, especially if
        you've never
        > worked with epoxy before, or only in small amounts.
        >
        > I'm going to order the paint trial kit ($11) and do some tests,
        I'll report
        > back what I find.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Glen



        Bolger rules!!!
        - no cursing, flaming, trolling, or spamming
        - no flogging dead horses
        - add something: take "thanks!" and "ditto!" posts off-list.
        - stay on topic and punctuate
        - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts
      • KF4call@aol.com
        At one point I was able to paint a car reasonably well with automotive acrylic lacquer and almost as well with acrylic enamel. Imperfections in the lacquer
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 6, 2000
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          At one point I was able to paint a car reasonably well with automotive
          acrylic lacquer and almost as well with acrylic enamel. Imperfections in the
          lacquer surface could be rubbed out, whereas I don't seem to recall that the
          enamel could. After about the third or fourth car, I could produce a shiny
          paint job with very few runs. Any thoughts on using these paints for boats?
          The lacquer may not be sufficiently flexible, but I imagine the enamel would
          work without the expense or toxic components of the two part preparations.
          Regards, Warren
        • Clyde S. Wisner
          I used water base on my Wherry, but did not thin it. I think I gave it 2 coats but only because I had a quart but I also did put it over primer. Doing small
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 7, 2000
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            I used water base on my Wherry, but did not thin it. I think I gave it 2 coats
            but only because I had a quart but I also did put it over primer. Doing small
            area and tipping with foam brush is key. Also it takes some time to fully
            harden, but once it is hard it is really hard. Clyde

            Glen Gibson wrote:

            > Does anyone have any experience with the water reduceable LPU paints put out
            > by System Three? They would appear to be a great solution to painting my
            > Micro, although not cheap. I'm willing to pay a little more for a great
            > finish, and simple water cleanup. Any help appreciated.
            >
            > Also, System Three put their catalog and great epoxy book (although I ended
            > up using Raka epoxy for my Micro, the System Three epoxy book is great, and
            > really helps in learning to work with this stuff) up on their web site,
            > check out
            >
            > http://www.systemthree.com/index.html
            >
            > and go to the literature section. Good reading, especially if you've never
            > worked with epoxy before, or only in small amounts.
            >
            > I'm going to order the paint trial kit ($11) and do some tests, I'll report
            > back what I find.
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Glen
            >
            >
            > Bolger rules!!!
            > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, or spamming
            > - no flogging dead horses
            > - add something: take "thanks!" and "ditto!" posts off-list.
            > - stay on topic and punctuate
            > - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts
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