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Re: Micro keel

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  • Peter Vanderwaart
    At least one Micro builder subcontracted the lead ballast to a professional. Another did some research with the people who provide lead shielding for dentists
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 1, 2000
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      At least one Micro builder subcontracted the lead ballast to a
      professional.

      Another did some research with the people who provide lead shielding
      for dentists offices, hospitals and other places who use x-rays. The
      were willing to pour a slab of the desired thickness out of which the
      desired shape could be cut. They would buy back the excess lead.

      So, there are many ways to ballast a cat-yawl.

      PHV


      --- In bolger@egroups.com, "Don H. Reed" <donhreed@m...> wrote:
      > Pheww!!!!
      > Gosh, Peter, thanks for saying that...That's a shot in the
      arm. 'Cause I
      > was beginning to worry. I thought I could sneak by and build
      around my
      > keel-mess...you've pretty much confirmed my thoughts on the
      subject. Point
      > is--to be out on the blue enjoying rather than wringing my hands in
      worry
      > about "keel envy", or worse, keel fall off. Yikes!
      >
      > Even if it does, (fall off), @ $0.15 per lbs. for scrap
      lead...it'll be back
      > to the drawing board for sure. Now that's an Idea! Why hasn't one
      of the
      > faithful gone into the mass produced, Micro-keel business? [It's a
      > rhetorical question] ;-)
      >
      > Thanks for the help.
      >
      > Don
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Peter Vanderwaart <pvanderw@o...>
      > To: bolger@egroups.com <bolger@egroups.com>
      > Date: Wednesday, November 01, 2000 11:09 AM
      > Subject: [bolger] Re: Micro keel
      >
      >
      > >> clogged up. Molten lead splashed and hardened immediately--
      > >blocking
      > >> feeder hole.
      > >
      > >Up to now, all the stories I have read about pouring keels include
      > >the part where the hero takes a propane torch and heats the outlet
      > >pipe to re-melt the plug that forms there.
      > >
      > >I don't think that the Micro design relies on any strength from the
      > >lead keel. If you get the keel properly built around the lead, you
      > >should be fine.
      > >
      > >Peter
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Bolger rules!!!
      > >- no cursing
      > >- stay on topic
      > >- use punctuation
      > >- add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts
      > >- add some content: send "thanks!" and "ditto!" posts off-list.
      > >
      > >
    • Jim Goeckermann
      The list has cycled through keel casting before, but since there are some new builders it might be worth repeating the following: Lead can be melted on the
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 1, 2000
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        The list has cycled through keel casting before, but since there are some new
        builders it might be worth repeating the following:
        Lead can be melted on the kitchen stove (not suggested) or its equivalent - it
        only takes around 750 degrees F. The fumes are toxic, and the arsenic usually
        found in the melt is a concern. Normal free-flowing ventilation will take care
        of this.
        Any (Really, ANY - even a teaspoon!) water can be disasterous. A dripping tin
        roof, a dipper with a few drops of water, or wet wheelweights added to the melt
        can blow the melt right out of the pot and all over you. Thick gloves, good
        boots, layered (non-synthetic) clothing is called for. Eye protection is a must.

        BUT, it is really not that hard to do, and the lead can be sawed (even planed)
        once cast, and since the Micro puts it all in a box, it is OK to have a flawed
        casting. A half a dozen borrowed Coleman stoves and a few garage sale cast iron
        pots will get you in the backyard foundary business. Anyone who has never
        skimmed pieces of steel that are floating on a shiny pool of lead is missing a
        thrill. Furthermore, you may know an expert - any friends who cast bullets or
        fishing weights? Drift boat anchors?
        If the lead is really that much of a block to your building, think about a steel
        piece from a metal salvage yard. They are reasonable, sell by the pound, and
        will cut to order.
        Lastly,( though I have cast a lot of lead - but never a keel) consider doing
        your cast into a 3 sided box. If it is level, you don't need a top! Disclaimer
        - I haven't done it, but I know that the lead finds level all by itself.
        Jim
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