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Coastal and ICW Cruiser design needed for a large disabled Broken Sailor

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  • kuyongchuin
    As Scot said I am interested in building a boat to meet my special needs. I am a large disabled man and I am trying to get my weight down. I have never sailed
    Message 1 of 26 , Aug 10, 2014
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      As Scot said I am interested in building a boat to meet my special needs. I am a large disabled man and I am trying to get my weight down. I have never sailed before yet but I am not new to boats or the water. I am 6'6" tall and last I weighed I was 268 down from 275. This in itself presents a problem of having enough room inside the cabin for someone my size an hopefully be able to stand up inside. Add to that I have two back knees and a bad back to boot. I also have to take medication for my blood pressure and non insulin dependent diabetes that require me to avoid prolonged exposure to direct sunlight. This means I need a Bimini top over the pilot box. The boat needs to have a shallow enough draft to sail in Kentucky Lake, the ICW of the Tennessee river to the gulf, the Flats in Florida as well as be able to transverse the Okeechobee waterways from west to east Florida. Be able to allow me once I learn to sail locally to safely sail from the marina in Kentucky lake to the Tennessee river to the Gulf then follow the coast and up the eastern seaboard to as far as South Carolina or maybe a little further north to the Boston Mass area. Eventually I want to get a blue water boat but for now, one that will let me sail the coast line, the Keys and the Caribbean that I can live on the hook from will do me for a long time. I can build out of wood but I can also weld and work with stainless steel. Though I know that building a steel boat is stronger and stiffer than a wooden boat they are heavier, slower, and more expensive to build. Being able to build the boat on the cheap is very important since I am on a fixed income and will only be able to put about $150 a month toward building supplies. Scot tells me a sharpie type design with a cabin will probably be my best bet to fill my needs.  The boat will need a flat deck area for fishing with chair if possible. The boat will need to be self righting and hard to capsize. It will need to be able to be sailed solo from ether the pilot box or inside the cabin during bad weather. Also be easy for me to get in and out of the boat easily. Hopefully this group can help me with the proper design that will fit my needs. Thanks in advance for your input.   


      Joey AKA kuyongchuin AKA Broken Sailor


    • sirdarnell
      Phil Bolger s Whalewatcher was designed for a man meeting your description for sailing on the lower part of the Chesapeake Bay with his taller son.
      Message 2 of 26 , Aug 11, 2014
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        Phil Bolger's Whalewatcher was designed for a man meeting your description for sailing on the lower part of the Chesapeake Bay with his taller son.
      • mason smith
        I was going to mention Whalewatcher but thought this person wanted to be able to handle his boat solo from various positions, and WW may not suit that
        Message 3 of 26 , Aug 11, 2014
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          I was going to mention Whalewatcher but thought this person wanted to be able to handle his boat solo from various positions, and WW may not suit that requirement. However, he should look into it and be aware that a Whalewatcher already complete, professionally done to plan, and in new condition, is for sale at about half the cost of building a new one.

           

          From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com]
          Sent: Monday, August 11, 2014 10:39 AM
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [bolger] Re: Coastal and ICW Cruiser design needed for a large disabled Broken Sailor

           

           

          Phil Bolger's Whalewatcher was designed for a man meeting your description for sailing on the lower part of the Chesapeake Bay with his taller son.

        • Connor, Patrick
          Taking it up to Les Cheneaux Islands in N lake Huron this coming weekend for a few days of cruising... Patrick A. Connor Executive Vice President & Manager,
          Message 4 of 26 , Aug 11, 2014
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            Taking it up to Les Cheneaux Islands in N lake Huron this coming weekend for a few days of cruising...

             

            Patrick A. Connor

            Executive Vice President & Manager,

            National Services Group

            Old Republic National Title Insurance Company

            141 East Town Street, Suite 101

            Columbus, Ohio 43215-5412

            Phone: 614-341-1900 Ext 13502

            Mobile: 614-208-9308

            Facsimile: 614-341-1903

            From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com]
            Sent: Monday, August 11, 2014 12:01 PM
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: Coastal and ICW Cruiser design needed for a large disabled Broken Sailor

             

             

            I was going to mention Whalewatcher but thought this person wanted to be able to handle his boat solo from various positions, and WW may not suit that requirement. However, he should look into it and be aware that a Whalewatcher already complete, professionally done to plan, and in new condition, is for sale at about half the cost of building a new one.

             

            From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com]
            Sent: Monday, August 11, 2014 10:39 AM
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [bolger] Re: Coastal and ICW Cruiser design needed for a large disabled Broken Sailor

             

             

            Phil Bolger's Whalewatcher was designed for a man meeting your description for sailing on the lower part of the Chesapeake Bay with his taller son.

          • pvanderwaart
            Just a couple of comments. 1. PCB did design a power sharpie for Bernie Wolford who was in a wheel chair. I forget the design name. Not what the gentleman
            Message 5 of 26 , Aug 11, 2014
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              Just a couple of comments.

              1. PCB did design a power sharpie for Bernie Wolford who was in a wheel chair. I forget the design name. Not what the gentleman wanted, but it's an option.

              2. The Caribbean was mentioned along with other coastal options. You really want a blue water boat for that. They have hurricanes down there, you know, and the distances are long.

              3. I agree that Whale Watcher deserves a look, but I'd be wary of an open seacoast. The other Birdwatcher-type designs deserve a look too, including Birdwatcher II. I've wondered to what extent these designs reduce sun exposure. If a more conventional pilot house is desired, look at the Navigator version of Sea Bird '86.

              4. Each design needs to be reviewed in detail. For example, the vertical ladder in Jesse Cooper could be impossible for some people, doable for others.
            • sirdarnell
              1. the sharpie designed for Bernie and wheel chair was Idaho a power sharpie. The Whalewatcher was designed for a tall man with a bad back that needed a boat
              Message 6 of 26 , Aug 12, 2014
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                1. the sharpie designed for Bernie and wheel chair was Idaho a power sharpie.  The Whalewatcher was designed for a tall man with a bad back that needed a boat designed for a taller person with good back support at the tiller and other seating positions.  It was to be used on the ICW and the lower Chesapeake near where he lived according to Boats With Open Mind.
              • jdmeddock
                A lot of your stated use demands good motoring capability. Are you SURE you want to sail? Should consider the sort of boat you mention but without sail power.
                Message 7 of 26 , Aug 13, 2014
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                  A lot of your stated use demands good motoring capability. Are you SURE you want to sail? Should consider the sort of boat you mention but without sail power. Could also add a good sailing dinghy to sail once you are at a destination when wind/your back/weather is optimal.Justin
                • trimaran
                  Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns*
                  Message 8 of 26 , Aug 14, 2014
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                    Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns* We probably would have crossed paths at some point. I haven't been to Les Cheneaux yet, so I would love to hear all about your trip. In years past I have launched in Detour (MI) and sailed east into the North Channel, sometimes spending two weeks living on my LM. So, on behalf of all Bolgeristas, can you please provide a detailed trip report (e.g., anchorages, good places to go, sites, sounds (mosquitoes), and experiences with your boat)? We wait with baited breath.What the heck is baited breath anyway?Bill, in TexasLong Micro Pugnacious
                  • Bill Howard
                    Do you mean ôbated breath?ö ... Do you mean ôbated breath?ö On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:28 AM, kingw@bgnet.bgsu.edu [bolger] wrote:
                    Message 9 of 26 , Aug 14, 2014
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                      Do you mean “bated breath?”

                      On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:28 AM, kingw@... [bolger] <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                      Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns* We probably would have crossed paths at some point. I haven't been to Les Cheneaux yet, so I would love to hear all about your trip. In years past I have launched in Detour (MI) and sailed east into the North Channel, sometimes spending two weeks living on my LM. So, on behalf of all Bolgeristas, can you please provide a detailed trip report (e.g., anchorages, good places to go, sites, sounds (mosquitoes), and experiences with your boat)? We wait with baited breath.What the heck is baited breath anyway?Bill, in TexasLong Micro Pugnacious


                    • Bill Howard
                      Bated here is a contraction of abated through loss of the unstressed first vowel (a process called aphesis); it means ôreduced, lessened, lowered in forceö.
                      Message 10 of 26 , Aug 14, 2014
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                        "Bated here is a contraction of abated through loss of the unstressed first vowel (a process called aphesis); it means “reduced, lessened, lowered in force”. So bated breath refers to a state in which you almost stop breathing as a result of some strong emotion, such as terror or awe.


                        On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:34 AM, Bill Howard billh39@... [bolger] <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                        Do you mean “bated breath?”


                        On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:28 AM, kingw@... [bolger] <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                        Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns* We probably would have crossed paths at some point. I haven't been to Les Cheneaux yet, so I would love to hear all about your trip. In years past I have launched in Detour (MI) and sailed east into the North Channel, sometimes spending two weeks living on my LM. So, on behalf of all Bolgeristas, can you please provide a detailed trip report (e.g., anchorages, good places to go, sites, sounds (mosquitoes), and experiences with your boat)? We wait with baited breath.What the heck is baited breath anyway?Bill, in TexasLong Micro Pugnacious




                      • Mark Albanese
                        Or anticipation On Aug 14, 2014 7:50 AM, Bill Howard billh39@verizon.net [bolger]
                        Message 11 of 26 , Aug 14, 2014
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                          Or anticipation

                          On Aug 14, 2014 7:50 AM, "Bill Howard billh39@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                           

                          "Bated here is a contraction of abated through loss of the unstressed first vowel (a process called aphesis); it means “reduced, lessened, lowered in force”. So bated breath refers to a state in which you almost stop breathing as a result of some strong emotion, such as terror or awe.



                          On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:34 AM, Bill Howard billh39@... [bolger] <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                          Do you mean “bated breath?”


                          On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:28 AM, kingw@... [bolger] <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                          Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns* We probably would have crossed paths at some point. I haven't been to Les Cheneaux yet, so I would love to hear all about your trip. In years past I have launched in Detour (MI) and sailed east into the North Channel, sometimes spending two weeks living on my LM. So, on behalf of all Bolgeristas, can you please provide a detailed trip report (e.g., anchorages, good places to go, sites, sounds (mosquitoes), and experiences with your boat)? We wait with baited breath.What the heck is baited breath anyway?Bill, in TexasLong Micro Pugnacious




                        • trimaran
                          ...yes, anticipation of an inspiring trip report. I had envisioned an angler fish when I mis-wrote baited breath. Patrick will hopefully report if he caught
                          Message 12 of 26 , Aug 14, 2014
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                            ...yes, anticipation of an inspiring trip report. I had envisioned an angler fish when I mis-wrote "baited breath." Patrick will hopefully report if he caught any angler fish on his trip to Lake Huron.Bill, in Texas
                          • Scot McPherson
                            Or apnea Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA Shoreline, CT Sent from my iPhone ... Or apnea Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA Shoreline, CT Sent from my iPhone On Aug
                            Message 13 of 26 , Aug 14, 2014
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                              Or apnea

                              Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
                              Shoreline, CT
                              Sent from my iPhone

                              On Aug 14, 2014, at 11:16 AM, "Mark Albanese marka97203@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                              Or anticipation

                              On Aug 14, 2014 7:50 AM, "Bill Howard billh39@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                               

                              "Bated here is a contraction of abated through loss of the unstressed first vowel (a process called aphesis); it means “reduced, lessened, lowered in force”. So bated breath refers to a state in which you almost stop breathing as a result of some strong emotion, such as terror or awe.



                              On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:34 AM, Bill Howard billh39@... [bolger] <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                              Do you mean “bated breath?”


                              On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:28 AM, kingw@... [bolger] <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                              Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns* We probably would have crossed paths at some point. I haven't been to Les Cheneaux yet, so I would love to hear all about your trip. In years past I have launched in Detour (MI) and sailed east into the North Channel, sometimes spending two weeks living on my LM. So, on behalf of all Bolgeristas, can you please provide a detailed trip report (e.g., anchorages, good places to go, sites, sounds (mosquitoes), and experiences with your boat)? We wait with baited breath.What the heck is baited breath anyway?Bill, in TexasLong Micro Pugnacious




                            • Leigh
                              No I think he has night crawlers in his mouth. It s a Midwest way of reducing the tension of waiting for an anticipated pleasure. Leigh Ross 484-464-1575 (C)
                              Message 14 of 26 , Aug 14, 2014
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                                No I think he has night crawlers in his mouth. It's a Midwest way of reducing the tension of waiting for an anticipated pleasure. 

                                Leigh Ross

                                484-464-1575 (C)



                                On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:34, "Bill Howard billh39@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                 

                                Do you mean “bated breath?”


                                On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:28 AM, kingw@... [bolger] <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns* We probably would have crossed paths at some point. I haven't been to Les Cheneaux yet, so I would love to hear all about your trip. In years past I have launched in Detour (MI) and sailed east into the North Channel, sometimes spending two weeks living on my LM. So, on behalf of all Bolgeristas, can you please provide a detailed trip report (e.g., anchorages, good places to go, sites, sounds (mosquitoes), and experiences with your boat)? We wait with baited breath.What the heck is baited breath anyway?Bill, in TexasLong Micro Pugnacious


                              • Connor, Patrick
                                Will do. En route as we speak. Sent from my iPhone ... Will do. En route as we speak. Sent from my iPhone On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:34 AM, Bill Howard
                                Message 15 of 26 , Aug 14, 2014
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                                  Will do. En route as we speak.

                                  Sent from my iPhone

                                  On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:34 AM, "Bill Howard billh39@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                   

                                  Do you mean “bated breath?”


                                  On Aug 14, 2014, at 10:28 AM, kingw@... [bolger] <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                  Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns* We probably would have crossed paths at some point. I haven't been to Les Cheneaux yet, so I would love to hear all about your trip. In years past I have launched in Detour (MI) and sailed east into the North Channel, sometimes spending two weeks living on my LM. So, on behalf of all Bolgeristas, can you please provide a detailed trip report (e.g., anchorages, good places to go, sites, sounds (mosquitoes), and experiences with your boat)? We wait with baited breath.What the heck is baited breath anyway?Bill, in TexasLong Micro Pugnacious


                                • kuyongchuin
                                  I have been thinking on the requirements some more, It doesn t have to be a sharpie, The Tennessee river waterway has a minimum draft in the channel of 9 when
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Aug 14, 2014
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                                    I have been thinking on the requirements some more, It doesn't have to be a sharpie, The Tennessee river waterway has a minimum draft in the channel of 9' when they lower the water level. Knowing it will be hard to if not impossible to sail in some places and that you will have to motor, I am leaning toward a shoal draft motor sailor design, something under 40 feet. More like 30 to 36 feet in length. A cabin that I can live aboard and stand up inside the cabin. If it can handle going in any ocean in the world safely that much the better. But mostly I will be staying in the ICW and along the coast. I can get from where I live to the Gulf in Mobile, AL by using the Tennessee River water ways then follow the coast to FL and the keys.  
                                  • Connor, Patrick
                                    Just returned from Michigan and our way-too-short cruise in Les Cheneaux Islands. This trip , our second, was aided by a wonderful Smartphone App, Windfinder,
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Aug 20, 2014
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                                      Just returned from Michigan and our way-too-short cruise in Les Cheneaux Islands. This trip , our second, was aided by a wonderful Smartphone App, Windfinder, that forecasts wind strengths and directions from thousands of points on the globe. It used several stations in our cruising area. I recommend it. We also used conventional charts to set our courses and destinations but monitored our course tracks and speed on a handheld GPS.

                                       

                                      On our way up, we debated launching from Cheboygan or Mackinaw City but based on the forecast of wind from the west, 8-12 knots, decided on Mackinaw City, sailing between Mackinac Island and Round Island and up through the West Entrance of Hessel Bay. This is the scenic route, giving one a great view of the Mackinac Island waterfront and Fort Mackinac.

                                       

                                      We arrived at the State Docks at Mackinaw City about 5:30 on Thursday and set to work rigging Utilis. We were all set up before dark and would launch the next morning, when Al, our crew member from Baltimore, rendezvoused with us. Also crewing were my son Ben and his friend Nick.

                                       

                                      The next morning we launched uneventfully and set out at 9:30 sharp. Winds were at the higher sides of the forecasted strengths and gusting to maybe 15 knots. We could have used a reef in the Straits of Mackinac but kept full sail, easing her in the puffs. This area acts as a funnel for both wind and currents and can get rough, especially with the more or less continuous run of ferries to and from Mackinac Island from several towns on the coast. Wind direction was ideal, across the port quarter. Utilis handled it fine and dry with the boards up about 3/4, a nice weather helm in the puffs, but controllable. Our GPS was clocking 6.5+ knots in the rough stuff, semi-surfing from time to time. Seas moderated once we turned up a bit at the bouy on the southeast corner of Mackinac Island. At that point, Utilis really picked up her skirts and we clocked speeds as high as 7.5 knots, at least until the wind died off a few miles from the West Entrance.

                                       

                                      We sailed all the way in and past Hessel, following the Channel behind Marquette Island to anchor in the lee across from Connor's Point at Muskellonge Bay. We dropped anchor just after 2:00 P.M. Our passage to the West Entrance, 16.2 NM from the launching ramp was notable- almost exactly 3 hours, average of 5.4knots. I think if the wind held (woulda, shoulda, coulda), this would easily have been a six knot run. After a late lunch, we picked up to move to the other side of the point we first anchored off of, deep into the shelter of the bay on the other side, for a quiet overnight anchorage. Joined some long time friends who have a cottage in the area for a fine dinner. Rained a couple of times during the night but we stayed warm and dry under Mason's clever cover.

                                       

                                      Saturday morning and back to Hessel after breakfast. With the wind still out of the west and blowing harder, we motored with the leeboards mostly up and bow centerboard down to control the bow falling off. The boys steered the boat. Stayed at the Hessel town marina which we strongly recommend. Hessel is a wonderful little scenic town and home of the annual Wooden Boat show (mostly Chris Craft and similar mahogany power boats). Spent a relaxing day and night there. Dinner was Beef Burgundy, prepared on the boat (Dinty Moore Beef Stew, with red wine and a bit of thyme added) and a relish.

                                       

                                      The next day after breakfast, we sailed to Mackinac Island, or at least sailed until the wind died. The wind was on the nose so we were tacking, but started up the motor around noon and motorsailed into the State Docks there at 2:30. Spent an enjoyable remainder of the day bicycling and seeing the sights of the island. Enjoyed some fudge and had a great  19th Birthday dinner for my son Ben at the Iroquois Hotel.

                                       

                                      Monday and winds were in the east, 15-20 knots. This really piles up the waves in the strait and viewed from the heights, which we did, is an intimidating sight. We reefed the sail before setting out at noon. Our initial plan was to motor with the mizzen luffing until we rounded Round Island, where we would raise the main in the lee and then sail back to the mainland. As it was, with mizzen alone set, leeboards set well back and bow centerboard down, we were able to sail off the wind at 3 1/2-4 1/2 knots in the rough water with a comfortable helm. Ben steered all the way, until we neared the entry to the harbor. A bit hairy in the very heavy swells approaching the sea wall. I took the helm with the motor started and running, Al harnessed  in the bow cockpit ready to toss the anchor if needed, but we made it in just fine.  We arrived at the launching ramp at 2:30. Took the rig down and spent the night on the boat in the parking lot, trailered her back Tuesday.

                                       

                                      All in all a great trip. The weather was just about perfect. Nights were cool (40's) and daytime highs in the mid 60's. Any overcast burned off before noon to cloudless skies. This is a wonderful cruising area in a small boat- with an eye to the weather. The water is pristine and there are lots of bays and coves behind the islands in which to anchor. Vistas are stunning and there are several charming small towns. Where a meal and shopping can be had. They are used to boaters but that said there aren't too many boats especially for sailors even in the peak season. the people are very friendly! We'll go back.

                                       

                                      From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com]
                                      Sent: Thursday, August 14, 2014 10:29 AM
                                      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: Coastal and ICW Cruiser design needed for a large disabled Broken Sailor

                                       

                                       

                                      Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns* We probably would have crossed paths at some point. I haven't been to Les Cheneaux yet, so I would love to hear all about your trip. In years past I have launched in Detour (MI) and sailed east into the North Channel, sometimes spending two weeks living on my LM. So, on behalf of all Bolgeristas, can you please provide a detailed trip report (e.g., anchorages, good places to go, sites, sounds (mosquitoes), and experiences with your boat)? We wait with baited breath.What the heck is baited breath anyway?Bill, in TexasLong Micro Pugnacious

                                    • Andrew Porter
                                      Thanks for the tip on Windfinder. Let me recommend another free app, Marine Navigator. Once you have it installed you download Nav Maps of your cruising area
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Aug 21, 2014
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                                        Thanks for the tip on Windfinder. Let me recommend another free app, Marine Navigator. Once you have it installed you download Nav Maps of your cruising area so you can navigate even when you don't have cell phone service. Two caveats, you're limited by your ability to see the phone screen in bright sunlight and battery life. I use my adapter and have some sort of sun shade handy.


                                        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                        From: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                        Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 11:06:15 -0500
                                        Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: Coastal and ICW Cruiser design needed for a large disabled Broken Sailor

                                         

                                        Just returned from Michigan and our way-too-short cruise in Les Cheneaux Islands. This trip , our second, was aided by a wonderful Smartphone App, Windfinder, that forecasts wind strengths and directions from thousands of points on the globe. It used several stations in our cruising area. I recommend it. We also used conventional charts to set our courses and destinations but monitored our course tracks and speed on a handheld GPS.

                                         

                                        On our way up, we debated launching from Cheboygan or Mackinaw City but based on the forecast of wind from the west, 8-12 knots, decided on Mackinaw City, sailing between Mackinac Island and Round Island and up through the West Entrance of Hessel Bay. This is the scenic route, giving one a great view of the Mackinac Island waterfront and Fort Mackinac.

                                         

                                        We arrived at the State Docks at Mackinaw City about 5:30 on Thursday and set to work rigging Utilis. We were all set up before dark and would launch the next morning, when Al, our crew member from Baltimore, rendezvoused with us. Also crewing were my son Ben and his friend Nick.

                                         

                                        The next morning we launched uneventfully and set out at 9:30 sharp. Winds were at the higher sides of the forecasted strengths and gusting to maybe 15 knots. We could have used a reef in the Straits of Mackinac but kept full sail, easing her in the puffs. This area acts as a funnel for both wind and currents and can get rough, especially with the more or less continuous run of ferries to and from Mackinac Island from several towns on the coast. Wind direction was ideal, across the port quarter. Utilis handled it fine and dry with the boards up about 3/4, a nice weather helm in the puffs, but controllable. Our GPS was clocking 6.5+ knots in the rough stuff, semi-surfing from time to time. Seas moderated once we turned up a bit at the bouy on the southeast corner of Mackinac Island. At that point, Utilis really picked up her skirts and we clocked speeds as high as 7.5 knots, at least until the wind died off a few miles from the West Entrance.

                                         

                                        We sailed all the way in and past Hessel, following the Channel behind Marquette Island to anchor in the lee across from Connor's Point at Muskellonge Bay. We dropped anchor just after 2:00 P.M. Our passage to the West Entrance, 16.2 NM from the launching ramp was notable- almost exactly 3 hours, average of 5.4knots. I think if the wind held (woulda, shoulda, coulda), this would easily have been a six knot run. After a late lunch, we picked up to move to the other side of the point we first anchored off of, deep into the shelter of the bay on the other side, for a quiet overnight anchorage. Joined some long time friends who have a cottage in the area for a fine dinner. Rained a couple of times during the night but we stayed warm and dry under Mason's clever cover.

                                         

                                        Saturday morning and back to Hessel after breakfast. With the wind still out of the west and blowing harder, we motored with the leeboards mostly up and bow centerboard down to control the bow falling off. The boys steered the boat. Stayed at the Hessel town marina which we strongly recommend. Hessel is a wonderful little scenic town and home of the annual Wooden Boat show (mostly Chris Craft and similar mahogany power boats). Spent a relaxing day and night there. Dinner was Beef Burgundy, prepared on the boat (Dinty Moore Beef Stew, with red wine and a bit of thyme added) and a relish.

                                         

                                        The next day after breakfast, we sailed to Mackinac Island, or at least sailed until the wind died. The wind was on the nose so we were tacking, but started up the motor around noon and motorsailed into the State Docks there at 2:30. Spent an enjoyable remainder of the day bicycling and seeing the sights of the island. Enjoyed some fudge and had a great  19th Birthday dinner for my son Ben at the Iroquois Hotel.

                                         

                                        Monday and winds were in the east, 15-20 knots. This really piles up the waves in the strait and viewed from the heights, which we did, is an intimidating sight. We reefed the sail before setting out at noon. Our initial plan was to motor with the mizzen luffing until we rounded Round Island, where we would raise the main in the lee and then sail back to the mainland. As it was, with mizzen alone set, leeboards set well back and bow centerboard down, we were able to sail off the wind at 3 1/2-4 1/2 knots in the rough water with a comfortable helm. Ben steered all the way, until we neared the entry to the harbor. A bit hairy in the very heavy swells approaching the sea wall. I took the helm with the motor started and running, Al harnessed  in the bow cockpit ready to toss the anchor if needed, but we made it in just fine.  We arrived at the launching ramp at 2:30. Took the rig down and spent the night on the boat in the parking lot, trailered her back Tuesday.

                                         

                                        All in all a great trip. The weather was just about perfect. Nights were cool (40's) and daytime highs in the mid 60's. Any overcast burned off before noon to cloudless skies. This is a wonderful cruising area in a small boat- with an eye to the weather. The water is pristine and there are lots of bays and coves behind the islands in which to anchor. Vistas are stunning and there are several charming small towns. Where a meal and shopping can be had. They are used to boaters but that said there aren't too many boats especially for sailors even in the peak season. the people are very friendly! We'll go back.

                                         

                                        From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com]
                                        Sent: Thursday, August 14, 2014 10:29 AM
                                        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: Coastal and ICW Cruiser design needed for a large disabled Broken Sailor

                                         

                                         

                                        Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns* We probably would have crossed paths at some point. I haven't been to Les Cheneaux yet, so I would love to hear all about your trip. In years past I have launched in Detour (MI) and sailed east into the North Channel, sometimes spending two weeks living on my LM. So, on behalf of all Bolgeristas, can you please provide a detailed trip report (e.g., anchorages, good places to go, sites, sounds (mosquitoes), and experiences with your boat)? We wait with baited breath.What the heck is baited breath anyway?Bill, in TexasLong Micro Pugnacious


                                      • Connor, Patrick
                                        Thanks for the Marine Navigator tip! We also used Windfinder in the Governor s Cup race on Chesapeake Bay and it helped us to considerably improve our finish
                                        Message 19 of 26 , Aug 21, 2014
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                                          Thanks for the Marine Navigator tip! We also used Windfinder in the Governor's Cup race on Chesapeake Bay  and it helped us to considerably improve our finish times over last year.

                                           

                                          I might add the boat speeds we achieved on our Les Cheneaux cruise were done so while towing a Ruben's Nymph dinghy..

                                           

                                          From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com]
                                          Sent: Thursday, August 21, 2014 9:39 AM
                                          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: Coastal and ICW Cruiser design needed for a large disabled Broken Sailor

                                           

                                           

                                          Thanks for the tip on Windfinder. Let me recommend another free app, Marine Navigator. Once you have it installed you download Nav Maps of your cruising area so you can navigate even when you don't have cell phone service. Two caveats, you're limited by your ability to see the phone screen in bright sunlight and battery life. I use my adapter and have some sort of sun shade handy.


                                          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                          From: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                          Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 11:06:15 -0500
                                          Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: Coastal and ICW Cruiser design needed for a large disabled Broken Sailor

                                           

                                           

                                          Just returned from Michigan and our way-too-short cruise in Les Cheneaux Islands. This trip , our second, was aided by a wonderful Smartphone App, Windfinder, that forecasts wind strengths and directions from thousands of points on the globe. It used several stations in our cruising area. I recommend it. We also used conventional charts to set our courses and destinations but monitored our course tracks and speed on a handheld GPS.

                                           

                                          On our way up, we debated launching from Cheboygan or Mackinaw City but based on the forecast of wind from the west, 8-12 knots, decided on Mackinaw City, sailing between Mackinac Island and Round Island and up through the West Entrance of Hessel Bay. This is the scenic route, giving one a great view of the Mackinac Island waterfront and Fort Mackinac.

                                           

                                          We arrived at the State Docks at Mackinaw City about 5:30 on Thursday and set to work rigging Utilis. We were all set up before dark and would launch the next morning, when Al, our crew member from Baltimore, rendezvoused with us. Also crewing were my son Ben and his friend Nick.

                                           

                                          The next morning we launched uneventfully and set out at 9:30 sharp. Winds were at the higher sides of the forecasted strengths and gusting to maybe 15 knots. We could have used a reef in the Straits of Mackinac but kept full sail, easing her in the puffs. This area acts as a funnel for both wind and currents and can get rough, especially with the more or less continuous run of ferries to and from Mackinac Island from several towns on the coast. Wind direction was ideal, across the port quarter. Utilis handled it fine and dry with the boards up about 3/4, a nice weather helm in the puffs, but controllable. Our GPS was clocking 6.5+ knots in the rough stuff, semi-surfing from time to time. Seas moderated once we turned up a bit at the bouy on the southeast corner of Mackinac Island. At that point, Utilis really picked up her skirts and we clocked speeds as high as 7.5 knots, at least until the wind died off a few miles from the West Entrance.

                                           

                                          We sailed all the way in and past Hessel, following the Channel behind Marquette Island to anchor in the lee across from Connor's Point at Muskellonge Bay. We dropped anchor just after 2:00 P.M. Our passage to the West Entrance, 16.2 NM from the launching ramp was notable- almost exactly 3 hours, average of 5.4knots. I think if the wind held (woulda, shoulda, coulda), this would easily have been a six knot run. After a late lunch, we picked up to move to the other side of the point we first anchored off of, deep into the shelter of the bay on the other side, for a quiet overnight anchorage. Joined some long time friends who have a cottage in the area for a fine dinner. Rained a couple of times during the night but we stayed warm and dry under Mason's clever cover.

                                           

                                          Saturday morning and back to Hessel after breakfast. With the wind still out of the west and blowing harder, we motored with the leeboards mostly up and bow centerboard down to control the bow falling off. The boys steered the boat. Stayed at the Hessel town marina which we strongly recommend. Hessel is a wonderful little scenic town and home of the annual Wooden Boat show (mostly Chris Craft and similar mahogany power boats). Spent a relaxing day and night there. Dinner was Beef Burgundy, prepared on the boat (Dinty Moore Beef Stew, with red wine and a bit of thyme added) and a relish.

                                           

                                          The next day after breakfast, we sailed to Mackinac Island, or at least sailed until the wind died. The wind was on the nose so we were tacking, but started up the motor around noon and motorsailed into the State Docks there at 2:30. Spent an enjoyable remainder of the day bicycling and seeing the sights of the island. Enjoyed some fudge and had a great  19th Birthday dinner for my son Ben at the Iroquois Hotel.

                                           

                                          Monday and winds were in the east, 15-20 knots. This really piles up the waves in the strait and viewed from the heights, which we did, is an intimidating sight. We reefed the sail before setting out at noon. Our initial plan was to motor with the mizzen luffing until we rounded Round Island, where we would raise the main in the lee and then sail back to the mainland. As it was, with mizzen alone set, leeboards set well back and bow centerboard down, we were able to sail off the wind at 3 1/2-4 1/2 knots in the rough water with a comfortable helm. Ben steered all the way, until we neared the entry to the harbor. A bit hairy in the very heavy swells approaching the sea wall. I took the helm with the motor started and running, Al harnessed  in the bow cockpit ready to toss the anchor if needed, but we made it in just fine.  We arrived at the launching ramp at 2:30. Took the rig down and spent the night on the boat in the parking lot, trailered her back Tuesday.

                                           

                                          All in all a great trip. The weather was just about perfect. Nights were cool (40's) and daytime highs in the mid 60's. Any overcast burned off before noon to cloudless skies. This is a wonderful cruising area in a small boat- with an eye to the weather. The water is pristine and there are lots of bays and coves behind the islands in which to anchor. Vistas are stunning and there are several charming small towns. Where a meal and shopping can be had. They are used to boaters but that said there aren't too many boats especially for sailors even in the peak season. the people are very friendly! We'll go back.

                                           

                                          From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com]
                                          Sent: Thursday, August 14, 2014 10:29 AM
                                          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: Coastal and ICW Cruiser design needed for a large disabled Broken Sailor

                                           

                                           

                                          Patrick,I came sooo close to cruising Les Cheneaux Islands this August in my Long Micro, but other commitments slammed shut the window of opportunity. *frowns* We probably would have crossed paths at some point. I haven't been to Les Cheneaux yet, so I would love to hear all about your trip. In years past I have launched in Detour (MI) and sailed east into the North Channel, sometimes spending two weeks living on my LM. So, on behalf of all Bolgeristas, can you please provide a detailed trip report (e.g., anchorages, good places to go, sites, sounds (mosquitoes), and experiences with your boat)? We wait with baited breath.What the heck is baited breath anyway?Bill, in TexasLong Micro Pugnacious

                                           

                                        • trimaran
                                          PatrickThank you for sharing. For those interested, the US Nautical Chart of the area is 14855 Les Cheneaux Islands. General comments and questions:Those
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Aug 21, 2014
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                                            PatrickThank you for sharing. For those interested, the US Nautical Chart of the area is 14855 "Les Cheneaux Islands."
                                            General comments and questions:Those boat speeds are very impressive. How was the anchoring/holding in Muscallonge Bay (to the east of Marquette I., which is where I think you spent the first night). In particular, is there much traffic in the channel, and can you find good spots away from houses and cables? Hessel Bay appears to be filled with cables criss-crossing the bottom. If you had more time, would you travel further east (via the channel, to Cedarville, Government Bay, etc.), or would you go somewhere else? Finally, how busy was Macinac Island?
                                            Thanks again for the detailed report. It's great to read about such Bolger boat adventures.
                                            Bill, in Texas
                                          • Connor, Patrick
                                            We anchored way up in the bay that stretches out to the northwest. holding was fine there are some rocky areas. We were in probably 3 feet of water. Sent from
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Aug 22, 2014
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                                              We anchored way up in the bay that stretches out to the northwest. holding was fine there are some rocky areas. We were in probably 3 feet of water.

                                              Sent from my iPhone

                                              On Aug 21, 2014, at 5:26 PM, "kingw@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                               

                                              PatrickThank you for sharing. For those interested, the US Nautical Chart of the area is 14855 "Les Cheneaux Islands."
                                              General comments and questions:Those boat speeds are very impressive. How was the anchoring/holding in Muscallonge Bay (to the east of Marquette I., which is where I think you spent the first night). In particular, is there much traffic in the channel, and can you find good spots away from houses and cables? Hessel Bay appears to be filled with cables criss-crossing the bottom. If you had more time, would you travel further east (via the channel, to Cedarville, Government Bay, etc.), or would you go somewhere else? Finally, how busy was Macinac Island?
                                              Thanks again for the detailed report. It's great to read about such Bolger boat adventures.
                                              Bill, in Texas

                                            • Connor, Patrick
                                              This was our second time in the islands with Utilis and my fifth overall. I would recommend them to any cruiser. There are a lot of anchorages, but you need to
                                              Message 22 of 26 , Aug 22, 2014
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                                                This was our second time in the islands with Utilis and my fifth overall. I would recommend them to any cruiser. There are a lot of anchorages, but you need to be aware of rocks, etc.; the bottom is highly variable. A traditional, CQR or Delta anchor with plenty of chain would be best. We also stayed in Marina at Hessel and in Cedarville. In both cases they were really nice. There is an excellent launching ramp at the Hessel Marina. I've not gone as far east as Port Dolomite or some of the east entrance bays so can't comment on that. Boat traffic appears to be very moderate. This may be different during the week of the Hessel Boat Show when thousands show up. We were there last in mid to late July and it never created problems for us. 

                                                Sent from my iPhone

                                                On Aug 22, 2014, at 8:47 AM, "'Connor, Patrick' pconnor@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                 

                                                We anchored way up in the bay that stretches out to the northwest. holding was fine there are some rocky areas. We were in probably 3 feet of water.

                                                Sent from my iPhone

                                                On Aug 21, 2014, at 5:26 PM, "kingw@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                 

                                                PatrickThank you for sharing. For those interested, the US Nautical Chart of the area is 14855 "Les Cheneaux Islands."
                                                General comments and questions:Those boat speeds are very impressive. How was the anchoring/holding in Muscallonge Bay (to the east of Marquette I., which is where I think you spent the first night). In particular, is there much traffic in the channel, and can you find good spots away from houses and cables? Hessel Bay appears to be filled with cables criss-crossing the bottom. If you had more time, would you travel further east (via the channel, to Cedarville, Government Bay, etc.), or would you go somewhere else? Finally, how busy was Macinac Island?
                                                Thanks again for the detailed report. It's great to read about such Bolger boat adventures.
                                                Bill, in Texas

                                              • Connor, Patrick
                                                This was our second time in the islands with Utilis and my fifth overall. I would recommend them to any cruiser. There are a lot of anchorages, but you need to
                                                Message 23 of 26 , Aug 22, 2014
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                                                  This was our second time in the islands with Utilis and my fifth overall. I would recommend them to any cruiser. There are a lot of anchorages, but you need to be aware of rocks, etc.; the bottom is highly variable. A traditional, CQR or Delta anchor with plenty of chain would be best. We also stayed in Marina at Hessel and in Cedarville. In both cases they were really nice. There is an excellent launching ramp at the Hessel Marina. I've not gone as far east as Port Dolomite or some of the east entrance bays so can't comment on that. Boat traffic appears to be very moderate. This may be different during the week of the Hessel Boat Show when thousands show up. We were there last in mid to late July and it never created problems for us. 

                                                  Sent from my iPhone

                                                  On Aug 22, 2014, at 8:47 AM, "'Connor, Patrick' pconnor@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                   

                                                  We anchored way up in the bay that stretches out to the northwest. holding was fine there are some rocky areas. We were in probably 3 feet of water.

                                                  Sent from my iPhone

                                                  On Aug 21, 2014, at 5:26 PM, "kingw@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                   

                                                  PatrickThank you for sharing. For those interested, the US Nautical Chart of the area is 14855 "Les Cheneaux Islands."
                                                  General comments and questions:Those boat speeds are

                                                • cluttonfred
                                                  Like others, I d say that both motor and sail is going to be tough, though not impossible. I definitely don t think full standing headroom is very realistic.
                                                  Message 24 of 26 , Aug 23, 2014
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                                                    Like others, I'd say that both motor and sail is going to be tough, though not impossible.  I definitely don't think full standing headroom is very realistic.  Sitting headroom, room to lay down, and a hatchway in which you can stand to pull on your pants is already going to be a challenge on $150 month.  I'd take a good look at some of Jim Michalak's designs as well, many even more Spartan than Bolger's own designs, and pick the absolute minimum boat to meet only your most important criteria.  Here are a couple that come to mind, the Blobster would allow easy entry/exit over the bow but would not provide as much sun protection, the AF4 could easily take a bimini.
                                                    AF4

                                                      

                                                    Blobster

                                                     





                                                  • Bill Howard
                                                    Michalak s Picara might also be considered. I have built a scale model, and I like the 500 lbs. ballast that makes her self-righting from 90 degrees. Bill
                                                    Message 25 of 26 , Aug 23, 2014
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                                                      Michalak's Picara might also be considered. I have built a scale model, and I like the 500 lbs. ballast that makes her self-righting from 90 degrees. 

                                                      Bill Howard
                                                      Nellysford VA

                                                      Sent from my iPhone

                                                      On Aug 23, 2014, at 9:51 AM, "owlnmole@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                       

                                                      Like others, I'd say that both motor and sail is going to be tough, though not impossible.  I definitely don't think full standing headroom is very realistic.  Sitting headroom, room to lay down, and a hatchway in which you can stand to pull on your pants is already going to be a challenge on $150 month.  I'd take a good look at some of Jim Michalak's designs as well, many even more Spartan than Bolger's own designs, and pick the absolute minimum boat to meet only your most important criteria.  Here are a couple that come to mind, the Blobster would allow easy entry/exit over the bow but would not provide as much sun protection, the AF4 could easily take a bimini.

                                                      AF4

                                                        

                                                      Blobster

                                                       





                                                    • Scot McPherson
                                                      You know, if you build it you can raise the cabin top to a comfortable level. It will have very little impact on the boats performance. That s one if the nice
                                                      Message 26 of 26 , Aug 23, 2014
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                                                        You know, if you build it you can raise the cabin top to a comfortable level. It will have very little impact on the boats performance. That's one if the nice things about building your own. Small changes can make a big difference in comfort.

                                                        Like angling the companionway so it's just as steep as YOU want, the beams are high enough to stand under, the bunks are long enough for you.

                                                        This was why I thought building a boat was in the OPs best interest so he has a boat designed for him, not the average 5'8" joe.

                                                        Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
                                                        Shoreline, CT
                                                        Sent from my iPhone

                                                        On Aug 23, 2014, at 11:36 AM, "Bill Howard billh39@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                        Michalak's Picara might also be considered. I have built a scale model, and I like the 500 lbs. ballast that makes her self-righting from 90 degrees. 

                                                        Bill Howard
                                                        Nellysford VA

                                                        Sent from my iPhone

                                                        On Aug 23, 2014, at 9:51 AM, "owlnmole@... [bolger]" <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                         

                                                        Like others, I'd say that both motor and sail is going to be tough, though not impossible.  I definitely don't think full standing headroom is very realistic.  Sitting headroom, room to lay down, and a hatchway in which you can stand to pull on your pants is already going to be a challenge on $150 month.  I'd take a good look at some of Jim Michalak's designs as well, many even more Spartan than Bolger's own designs, and pick the absolute minimum boat to meet only your most important criteria.  Here are a couple that come to mind, the Blobster would allow easy entry/exit over the bow but would not provide as much sun protection, the AF4 could easily take a bimini.

                                                        AF4

                                                          

                                                        Blobster

                                                         





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