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Tennessee build

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  • my48cj2a
    I will be building a Tennessee # 359. And I will also be having live hangout sessions talking about the boat and other related things with up to 9 guest.
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 14, 2014
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      I will be building a Tennessee # 359. And I will also be having live hangout sessions talking about the boat and other related things with up to 9 guest. Please feel free to Join in and share your adventures. 
    • my48cj2a
      https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/112816259102289907378/112816259102289907378/posts https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/112816259102289907378/112816259102289907378/posts
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 14, 2014
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      • my48cj2a
        Some scales to help with reading your blueprints: In our case 3/4 = 1 0 which comes out to 1/16th of a inch = 1 inch on the prints. Conversion Table: True
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 15, 2014
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          Some scales to help with reading your blueprints:
          In our case 3/4" = 1'0" which comes  out to  1/16th of a inch = 1 inch on the prints.

           Conversion Table: True Size (Feet) to Scale Size (Inches): 


           The following table, developed by Ken Dorr, allows you to convert dimensions on prototype, measured in feet, to dimensions on a model, measured in inches. To use the table, find the prototype dimension in feet in the left hand column. Then translate across until you reach the scale column for the scale of your model, and read off the scale dimension in inches. If the dimension you are looking for is not on the chart, you can find it by adding two other dimensions. Example #1 : A plank on the original ship is 20 feet long. To determine the length of this plank at 3/8"=1' scale, find the row for 20 feet, then translate across to the column labeled 3/8. The value at the intersection (7-1/2) is the length of the scale plank in inches. Example #2: A ship's boom on the prototype is 38 feet long. You which to determine the scale length of the boom at 3/16"=1' scale. Since this value is not shown on the chart, two look-up operations are needed. First, look up 30 feet in the right hand column. Translating across to the 3/16 column, we find the value 4-5/8 inches. This gives you the length of a 30 foot boom at 3/16"=1' scale. Next, starting in the left-most column with a length of 8 feet, translate across to the 3/16 column. This gives you scale length of the remaining 8 feet, 1-1/2 inch. Adding the two scale sizes together, you find that the length of the 38 foot boom is 4 5/8 + 1 1/2 = 6 1/8 inches in length at 3/16"=1' scale. 

        • phil.bolger
          Unless ‘reverse-engineering’ matters for whatever reasons, STAPLES will sell you a six-sided ‘Engineers Scale’ @ $8.- with which just about all of PB&F
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 15, 2014
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            Unless ‘reverse-engineering’ matters for whatever reasons, STAPLES will sell you a six-sided ‘Engineers Scale’ @ $8.- with which just about all of PB&F plans’ scales can be read reliably.

            Susanne Altenburger, PB&F  
             
            Sent: Saturday, February 15, 2014 5:11 PM
            Subject: [bolger] RE: Tennessee build
             
             

            Some scales to help with reading your blueprints:
            In our case 3/4" = 1'0" which comes  out to  1/16th of a inch = 1 inch on the prints.

            Conversion Table: True Size (Feet) to Scale Size (Inches):


            The following table, developed by Ken Dorr, allows you to convert dimensions on prototype, measured in feet, to dimensions on a model, measured in inches. To use the table, find the prototype dimension in feet in the left hand column. Then translate across until you reach the scale column for the scale of your model, and read off the scale dimension in inches. If the dimension you are looking for is not on the chart, you can find it by adding two other dimensions. Example #1 : A plank on the original ship is 20 feet long. To determine the length of this plank at 3/8"=1' scale, find the row for 20 feet, then translate across to the column labeled 3/8. The value at the intersection (7-1/2) is the length of the scale plank in inches. Example #2: A ship's boom on the prototype is 38 feet long. You which to determine the scale length of the boom at 3/16"=1' scale. Since this value is not shown on the chart, two look-up operations are needed. First, look up 30 feet in the right hand column. Translating across to the 3/16 column, we find the value 4-5/8 inches. This gives you the length of a 30 foot boom at 3/16"=1' scale. Next, starting in the left-most column with a length of 8 feet, translate across to the 3/16 column. This gives you scale length of the remaining 8 feet, 1-1/2 inch. Adding the two scale sizes together, you find that the length of the 38 foot boom is 4 5/8 + 1 1/2 = 6 1/8 inches in length at 3/16"=1' scale.


          • John Kohnen
            Engineer s scale rules measure in tenths and other odd scales, don t you mean an architect s scale rule? They re in fractions:
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 15, 2014
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              Engineer's scale rules measure in tenths and other odd scales, don't you
              mean an architect's scale rule? They're in fractions:

              http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B001DNHG64/themotherofal-20

              http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00006IAOX/themotherofal-20


              On Sat, 15 Feb 2014 16:29:12 -0800, Susanne wrote:

              > Unless ‘reverse-engineering’ matters for whatever reasons, STAPLES will
              > sell you a six-sided ‘Engineers Scale’ @ $8.- with which just about all
              > of PB&F plans’ scales can be read reliably.

              --
              John (jkohnen@...)
              If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River, the
              headline that afternoon would read "President Can't Swim.” Lyndon Johnson
            • phil.bolger
              Roger that. Thanks for the correction. More precise than my quick note. “You’ll know it when you see it...” Susanne Altenburger, PB&F From: John Kohnen
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 15, 2014
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                Roger that. 
                Thanks for the correction. 
                More precise than my quick note. 
                “You’ll know it when you see it...”

                Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
                Sent: Saturday, February 15, 2014 9:14 PM
                Subject: Re: [bolger] RE: Tennessee build
                 
                 

                Engineer's scale rules measure in tenths and other odd scales, don't you
                mean an architect's scale rule? They're in fractions:

                http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B001DNHG64/themotherofal-20

                http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00006IAOX/themotherofal-20

                On Sat, 15 Feb 2014 16:29:12 -0800, Susanne wrote:

                > Unless
                ‘reverse-engineering’ matters for whatever reasons, STAPLES will
                > sell
                you a six-sided ‘Engineers Scale’ @ $8.- with which just about all
                > of
                PB&F plans’ scales can be read reliably.

                --
                John (jkohnen@...)
                If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River, the
                headline that afternoon would read "President Can't Swim.” Lyndon Johnson

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