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AS-29 for sale

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  • simplysailingonline
    We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182 http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182
    Message 1 of 24 , Oct 10, 2013
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      We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

      Thanks,
      Connie
    • willers32
      This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River,
      Message 2 of 24 , Oct 11, 2013
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        This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare because of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



        ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

        We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182
        Thanks,
        Connie
      • a.sobriquet
        Mike, It s been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don t carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even
        Message 3 of 24 , Oct 12, 2013
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          Mike,

          It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

          A. Sobriquet



          ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

          This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare because of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



          ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

          We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182
          Thanks,
          Connie
        • Mason Smith
          The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees
          Message 4 of 24 , Oct 12, 2013
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            The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

             

            From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
            Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

             

             

            Mike,

            It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

            A. Sobriquet



            ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

            This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



            ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

            We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

            Thanks,

            Connie

          • Mark Albanese
            I m not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with a BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees. It was suggested to me that a
            Message 5 of 24 , Oct 13, 2013
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              I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with a BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.

              It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode would help.

              Funny, when I mentioned the swing to another old salt, one who sails a Witholtz cat boat, he shrugged and said not to worry, they all do that.

              The big house is a good sized sail. Next time I'll simply try a second anchor over the stern.

              marka

              On Oct 12, 2013 5:12 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:
               

              The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

               

              From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
              Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

               

               

              Mike,

              It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

              A. Sobriquet



              ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

              This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



              ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

              We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

              Thanks,

              Connie

            • Michael Wagner
              We really didn t solve these problems. We never found them severe enough to put much work or money into solving them. With Walkure, you have a wide range of
              Message 6 of 24 , Oct 13, 2013
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                We really didn't solve these problems. We never found them severe enough to put much work or money into solving them. With Walkure, you have a wide range of spots to anchor, since you can anchor in less than 2 feet of water. We just picked spots with no chop and no wind and tide opposed. We did find one spot where the pounding got quite severe - Key West mooring field. It's wide open to north winds and we had 4 straight days of 4 foot chop in the mooring field. Yuck!

                Bolger solved the pounding problem with an upgraded version of the AS-29 that had a rounded section added under the bow. This allowed for more comfortable anchoring. It would likely have to be done during construction and not as a retrofit. It's not on Walkure.

                We never found the "anchor dance" - yawing - to be at all annoying. If the water was deep enough, we put a board down, which slowed the motion a lot. Otherwise, we just got used to it. It's not nearly as pronounced on the AS-29 as it is on a MacGreggor or a Hunter. We've seen 40 foot Hunters dancing to and fro like mad while we sat relatively still.

                You can set the mizzen as a riding sail, and it helps, but mostly we didn't bother.



                On Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:44 AM, "a.sobriquet@..." <a.sobriquet@...> wrote:
                 
                Mike,
                It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?
                A. Sobriquet


                ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare because of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.


                ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182
                Thanks,
                Connie


              • captainrocky99
                Careful with that stern anchor. I once anchored a Morgan 41 OI. fore and aft in Longboat Pass in Fl. We woke up at dawn with the boat sideways to a falling
                Message 7 of 24 , Oct 13, 2013
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                  Careful with that stern anchor. I once anchored a Morgan 41 OI. fore and aft in Longboat Pass in Fl.
                  We woke up at dawn with the boat sideways to a falling tide with both rodes tight as a drum . The tide runs about 4 knots and the boat was healed about 30 degrees. The lines were so tight I could not free them from the cleats. I tied a boat cushion to the aft line and cut it with a knife. It acted like a cut bow string. When the boat swung straight I used the dink to retrieve the aft anchor and rode.I then motored up on the bow anchor ,created slack and free the line from the cleat. the Anchor was so embedded in the sand bottom I had to motor over it to dislodge it.
                  Never made that mistake again. BTW  almost all sinkings of small boats are cause by waves entering the boat from the stern being held down by a stern anchor. Careful . Rocky
                  From: "Mark Albanese" <marka97203@...>
                  To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sunday, October 13, 2013 6:46:30 AM
                  Subject: [bolger] RE: AS-29 for sale

                   

                  I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with a BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.

                  It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode would help.

                  Funny, when I mentioned the swing to another old salt, one who sails a Witholtz cat boat, he shrugged and said not to worry, they all do that.

                  The big house is a good sized sail. Next time I'll simply try a second anchor over the stern.

                  marka

                  On Oct 12, 2013 5:12 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:
                   

                  The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                   

                  From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                  Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                  To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                   

                   

                  Mike,

                  It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                  A. Sobriquet



                  ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                  This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                  ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                  We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                  Thanks,

                  Connie

                • Bill Howard
                  Been there, done that. Once. Bill Howard Nellysford VA Sent from my iPhone ... Been there, done that. Once. Bill Howard Nellysford VA Sent from my iPhone On
                  Message 8 of 24 , Oct 13, 2013
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                    Been there, done that. 

                    Once. 

                    Bill Howard
                    Nellysford VA 

                    Sent from my iPhone

                    On Oct 13, 2013, at 10:10 AM, captainrocky@... wrote:

                     

                    Careful with that stern anchor. I once anchored a Morgan 41 OI. fore and aft in Longboat Pass in Fl.
                    We woke up at dawn with the boat sideways to a falling tide with both rodes tight as a drum . The tide runs about 4 knots and the boat was healed about 30 degrees. The lines were so tight I could not free them from the cleats. I tied a boat cushion to the aft line and cut it with a knife. It acted like a cut bow string. When the boat swung straight I used the dink to retrieve the aft anchor and rode.I then motored up on the bow anchor ,created slack and free the line from the cleat. the Anchor was so embedded in the sand bottom I had to motor over it to dislodge it.
                    Never made that mistake again. BTW  almost all sinkings of small boats are cause by waves entering the boat from the stern being held down by a stern anchor. Careful . Rocky
                    From: "Mark Albanese" <marka97203@...>
                    To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Sunday, October 13, 2013 6:46:30 AM
                    Subject: [bolger] RE: AS-29 for sale

                     

                    I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with a BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.

                    It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode would help.

                    Funny, when I mentioned the swing to another old salt, one who sails a Witholtz cat boat, he shrugged and said not to worry, they all do that.

                    The big house is a good sized sail. Next time I'll simply try a second anchor over the stern.

                    marka

                    On Oct 12, 2013 5:12 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:
                     

                    The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                     

                    From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                    Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                    To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                     

                     

                    Mike,

                    It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                    A. Sobriquet



                    ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                    This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                    ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                    We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                    Thanks,

                    Connie

                  • John Kohnen
                    The bucket is full of water, because it s submerged, and it s slung from the rode near the bow of the boat. I suppose it could be slung right off the bow on a
                    Message 9 of 24 , Oct 13, 2013
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                      The bucket is full of water, because it's submerged, and it's slung from
                      the rode near the bow of the boat. I suppose it could be slung right off
                      the bow on a separate line. I think I picked up that tip from John
                      Welsford on one of the groups he frequents. I haven't tried it out
                      myself...

                      On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 03:46:30 -0700, Mark A wrote:

                      > I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with a
                      > BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.
                      >
                      > It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode would
                      > help.
                      > ...

                      --
                      John (jkohnen@...)
                      They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
                      safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. (Benjamin Franklin)
                    • Scot McPherson
                      How about a bucket off the stern? Wouldn t that give the sea anchor more leverage to keep the boat from swaying so much on the rode? Scot McPherson, PMP
                      Message 10 of 24 , Oct 13, 2013
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                        How about a bucket off the stern? Wouldn't that give the "sea anchor" more leverage to keep the boat from swaying so much on the rode?

                        Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
                        Old Lyme, CT
                        Sent from my iPhone

                        On Oct 13, 2013, at 3:33 PM, "John Kohnen" <jhkohnen@...> wrote:

                         

                        The bucket is full of water, because it's submerged, and it's slung from
                        the rode near the bow of the boat. I suppose it could be slung right off
                        the bow on a separate line. I think I picked up that tip from John
                        Welsford on one of the groups he frequents. I haven't tried it out
                        myself...

                        On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 03:46:30 -0700, Mark A wrote:

                        > I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with a
                        > BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.
                        >
                        > It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode would
                        > help.
                        > ...

                        --
                        John (jkohnen@...)
                        They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
                        safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. (Benjamin Franklin)

                      • Chief Redelk
                        Years ago I would fish on windy days from the windward short to the Lee by drifting with the wind. WHEN the wind would be moving met to fast. I would toss out
                        Message 11 of 24 , Oct 13, 2013
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                          Years ago I would fish on windy days from the windward short to the
                          Lee by drifting with the wind. WHEN the wind would be moving met to
                          fast. I would toss out two 5 gallon buckets..One off each end of the
                          boat. I was in my 8 foot scow drifting like that when a big boat
                          buzzed me..I was shocked at how well my boat rode out the wake...The
                          buckets of water did help a lot...I have wondered IF a 1 inch hole in
                          the bottom would make them work better...A decent bridle may help..
                          The hole would make it easier to raise them and a small weight on one
                          side near the top may make them sink faster..I am a big fan of Sea
                          Anchors..

                          On 10/13/13, Scot McPherson <scot.mcpherson@...> wrote:
                          > How about a bucket off the stern? Wouldn't that give the "sea anchor" more
                          > leverage to keep the boat from swaying so much on the rode?
                          >
                          > Scot McPherson, PMP CISSP MCSA
                          > Old Lyme, CT
                          > Sent from my iPhone
                          >
                          > On Oct 13, 2013, at 3:33 PM, "John Kohnen" <jhkohnen@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >> The bucket is full of water, because it's submerged, and it's slung from
                          >> the rode near the bow of the boat. I suppose it could be slung right off
                          >> the bow on a separate line. I think I picked up that tip from John
                          >> Welsford on one of the groups he frequents. I haven't tried it out
                          >> myself...
                          >>
                          >> On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 03:46:30 -0700, Mark A wrote:
                          >>
                          >> > I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with
                          >> > a
                          >> > BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.
                          >> >
                          >> > It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode
                          >> > would
                          >> > help.
                          >> > ...
                          >>
                          >> --
                          >> John (jkohnen@...)
                          >> They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
                          >> safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. (Benjamin Franklin)
                          >>
                          >
                        • creditscorenz
                          That s interesting. I was going to unreservedly recommend bow and stern anchors before reading your post. Of course, an unballasted 14 5 Michalak Philsboat
                          Message 12 of 24 , Oct 13, 2013
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                            That's interesting.  I was going to unreservedly recommend bow and stern anchors before reading your post.  Of course, an unballasted 14' 5" Michalak Philsboat birdwatcher and a 41' Morgan are chalk and cheese.


                            I anchor my Philsboat parallel to the shore, fore and aft on long scopes.  I leave the offset centreboard down to stop roll and the tiller to lee, so that the rudder is constantly trying to turn the boat into the wind.


                            I've slept relatively comfortably this way on the windward side in winds gusting to 25 knots, because the open slot was parallel to the on-shore wind, so I was sheltered under the slot decks.


                            I've also anchored stern too, which stops yawing, but I found the wave slap on the stern to be very annoying and of course the wind comes straight through the slot.


                            So for my situation, anchoring side on rather than fore and aft, seems to be the best solution.


                            Cheers,


                            Rob.



                            ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                            Careful with that stern anchor. I once anchored a Morgan 41 OI. fore and aft in Longboat Pass in Fl.
                            We woke up at dawn with the boat sideways to a falling tide with both rodes tight as a drum . The tide runs about 4 knots and the boat was healed about 30 degrees. The lines were so tight I could not free them from the cleats. I tied a boat cushion to the aft line and cut it with a knife. It acted like a cut bow string. When the boat swung straight I used the dink to retrieve the aft anchor and rode.I then motored up on the bow anchor ,created slack and free the line from the cleat. the Anchor was so embedded in the sand bottom I had to motor over it to dislodge it.
                            Never made that mistake again. BTW  almost all sinkings of small boats are cause by waves entering the boat from the stern being held down by a stern anchor. Careful . Rocky
                            From: "Mark Albanese" <marka97203@...>
                            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Sunday, October 13, 2013 6:46:30 AM
                            Subject: [bolger] RE: AS-29 for sale

                             

                            I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with a BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.

                            It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode would help.

                            Funny, when I mentioned the swing to another old salt, one who sails a Witholtz cat boat, he shrugged and said not to worry, they all do that.

                            The big house is a good sized sail. Next time I'll simply try a second anchor over the stern.

                            marka

                            On Oct 12, 2013 5:12 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:
                             

                            The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                             

                            From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                            Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                             

                             

                            Mike,

                            It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                            A. Sobriquet



                            ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                            This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                            ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                            We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                            Thanks,

                            Connie

                          • Connor, Patrick
                            I have a whalewatcher which is almost as high sided as an AS/29, just no raised house. I have been in an AS/29 and its sides are only a couple of inches higher
                            Message 13 of 24 , Oct 14, 2013
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I have a whalewatcher which is almost as high sided as an AS/29, just no raised house. I have been in an AS/29 and its sides are only a couple of inches higher above the waterline.  I use the mizzen religiously as a riding sail and have experienced no problems sailing at anchor. Of course the WW doesn't have the big plumb bow...but it does have even more fore overhang, probably five feet or more. 

                              I use a Quickset with plenty of chain and a high tensile Danforth as backup. It carries plenty of chain too. 

                              Sent from my iPhone

                              On Oct 12, 2013, at 8:13 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:

                               

                              The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                               

                              From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                              Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                               

                               

                              Mike,

                              It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                              A. Sobriquet



                              ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                              This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                              ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                              We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                              Thanks,

                              Connie

                            • mason smith
                              That’s interesting, Pat: Whalewatcher doesn’t sail around her anchor with the mizzen set. Wonder if it would without the mizzen. If my theory about the
                              Message 14 of 24 , Oct 14, 2013
                              • 0 Attachment

                                That’s interesting, Pat: Whalewatcher doesn’t sail around her anchor with the mizzen set. Wonder if it would without the mizzen. If my theory about the hull becoming a foil, developing high- and low-pressure sides, and swinging until the pressures must switch sides, then swinging the other way, the Birdwatcher’s double-endedness is a large part of the cause. So I would ask, do double-ended, flat-sided boats do this more than others? How was your Nimble 20?—did you need to set her mizzen at anchor too? (I saw one lately, on Mallet’s Bay, Lake Champlain, am trying to see if it can be bought.) ---Mason

                                 

                                From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Connor, Patrick
                                Sent: Monday, October 14, 2013 8:49 AM
                                To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                Cc: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                 

                                 

                                I have a whalewatcher which is almost as high sided as an AS/29, just no raised house. I have been in an AS/29 and its sides are only a couple of inches higher above the waterline.  I use the mizzen religiously as a riding sail and have experienced no problems sailing at anchor. Of course the WW doesn't have the big plumb bow...but it does have even more fore overhang, probably five feet or more. 

                                 

                                I use a Quickset with plenty of chain and a high tensile Danforth as backup. It carries plenty of chain too. 

                                Sent from my iPhone


                                On Oct 12, 2013, at 8:13 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:

                                 

                                The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                                 

                                From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                                Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                                To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                 

                                 

                                Mike,

                                It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                                A. Sobriquet



                                ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                                ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                                We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                                Thanks,

                                Connie

                              • Connor, Patrick
                                I did the same with my Rob Roy and it didn t sail either. In both cases a keep a board partially down. Sent from my iPhone ... I did the same with my Rob Roy
                                Message 15 of 24 , Oct 14, 2013
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  I did the same with my Rob Roy and it didn't sail either. In both cases a keep a board partially down. 

                                  Sent from my iPhone

                                  On Oct 14, 2013, at 9:30 AM, "mason smith" <masonsmith@...> wrote:

                                   

                                  That’s interesting, Pat: Whalewatcher doesn’t sail around her anchor with the mizzen set. Wonder if it would without the mizzen. If my theory about the hull becoming a foil, developing high- and low-pressure sides, and swinging until the pressures must switch sides, then swinging the other way, the Birdwatcher’s double-endedness is a large part of the cause. So I would ask, do double-ended, flat-sided boats do this more than others? How was your Nimble 20?—did you need to set her mizzen at anchor too? (I saw one lately, on Mallet’s Bay, Lake Champlain, am trying to see if it can be bought.) ---Mason

                                   

                                  From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Connor, Patrick
                                  Sent: Monday, October 14, 2013 8:49 AM
                                  To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                  Cc: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                   

                                   

                                  I have a whalewatcher which is almost as high sided as an AS/29, just no raised house. I have been in an AS/29 and its sides are only a couple of inches higher above the waterline.  I use the mizzen religiously as a riding sail and have experienced no problems sailing at anchor. Of course the WW doesn't have the big plumb bow...but it does have even more fore overhang, probably five feet or more. 

                                   

                                  I use a Quickset with plenty of chain and a high tensile Danforth as backup. It carries plenty of chain too. 

                                  Sent from my iPhone


                                  On Oct 12, 2013, at 8:13 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:

                                   

                                  The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                                   

                                  From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                                  Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                                  To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                   

                                   

                                  Mike,

                                  It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                                  A. Sobriquet



                                  ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                  This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                                  ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                                  We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                                  Thanks,

                                  Connie

                                • Connor, Patrick
                                  ... And 20 of 1/4 chain. Sent from my iPhone ... ... And 20 of 1/4 chain. Sent from my iPhone On Oct 14, 2013, at 9:30 AM, mason smith
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Oct 14, 2013
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    ... And 20' of 1/4" chain. 

                                    Sent from my iPhone

                                    On Oct 14, 2013, at 9:30 AM, "mason smith" <masonsmith@...> wrote:

                                     

                                    That’s interesting, Pat: Whalewatcher doesn’t sail around her anchor with the mizzen set. Wonder if it would without the mizzen. If my theory about the hull becoming a foil, developing high- and low-pressure sides, and swinging until the pressures must switch sides, then swinging the other way, the Birdwatcher’s double-endedness is a large part of the cause. So I would ask, do double-ended, flat-sided boats do this more than others? How was your Nimble 20?—did you need to set her mizzen at anchor too? (I saw one lately, on Mallet’s Bay, Lake Champlain, am trying to see if it can be bought.) ---Mason

                                     

                                    From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Connor, Patrick
                                    Sent: Monday, October 14, 2013 8:49 AM
                                    To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                    Cc: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                     

                                     

                                    I have a whalewatcher which is almost as high sided as an AS/29, just no raised house. I have been in an AS/29 and its sides are only a couple of inches higher above the waterline.  I use the mizzen religiously as a riding sail and have experienced no problems sailing at anchor. Of course the WW doesn't have the big plumb bow...but it does have even more fore overhang, probably five feet or more. 

                                     

                                    I use a Quickset with plenty of chain and a high tensile Danforth as backup. It carries plenty of chain too. 

                                    Sent from my iPhone


                                    On Oct 12, 2013, at 8:13 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:

                                     

                                    The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                                     

                                    From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                                    Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                                    To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                     

                                     

                                    Mike,

                                    It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                                    A. Sobriquet



                                    ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                    This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                                    ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                                    We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                                    Thanks,

                                    Connie

                                  • Connor, Patrick
                                    And the sail set and sheeted TIGHT. Sent from my iPhone ... And the sail set and sheeted TIGHT. Sent from my iPhone On Oct 14, 2013, at 9:35 AM, Connor,
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Oct 14, 2013
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      And the sail set and sheeted TIGHT. 

                                      Sent from my iPhone

                                      On Oct 14, 2013, at 9:35 AM, "Connor, Patrick" <pconnor@...> wrote:

                                       

                                      ... And 20' of 1/4" chain. 

                                      Sent from my iPhone

                                      On Oct 14, 2013, at 9:30 AM, "mason smith" <masonsmith@...> wrote:

                                       

                                      That’s interesting, Pat: Whalewatcher doesn’t sail around her anchor with the mizzen set. Wonder if it would without the mizzen. If my theory about the hull becoming a foil, developing high- and low-pressure sides, and swinging until the pressures must switch sides, then swinging the other way, the Birdwatcher’s double-endedness is a large part of the cause. So I would ask, do double-ended, flat-sided boats do this more than others? How was your Nimble 20?—did you need to set her mizzen at anchor too? (I saw one lately, on Mallet’s Bay, Lake Champlain, am trying to see if it can be bought.) ---Mason

                                       

                                      From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Connor, Patrick
                                      Sent: Monday, October 14, 2013 8:49 AM
                                      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                      Cc: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                       

                                       

                                      I have a whalewatcher which is almost as high sided as an AS/29, just no raised house. I have been in an AS/29 and its sides are only a couple of inches higher above the waterline.  I use the mizzen religiously as a riding sail and have experienced no problems sailing at anchor. Of course the WW doesn't have the big plumb bow...but it does have even more fore overhang, probably five feet or more. 

                                       

                                      I use a Quickset with plenty of chain and a high tensile Danforth as backup. It carries plenty of chain too. 

                                      Sent from my iPhone


                                      On Oct 12, 2013, at 8:13 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:

                                       

                                      The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                                       

                                      From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                                      Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                                      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                       

                                       

                                      Mike,

                                      It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                                      A. Sobriquet



                                      ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                      This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                                      ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                                      We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                                      Thanks,

                                      Connie

                                    • mkriley48
                                      I anchored for years with a bow and stern anchor with no problems. after you set the stern anchor you walk the rode to the bow! take most of the slack out.
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Oct 14, 2013
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        I anchored for years with a  bow and stern anchor with no problems.
                                        after you set the stern anchor you walk the rode to the bow!
                                        take most of the slack out. You need to know how to do this as there are many places that this needs to be done.
                                        google bahamian moor
                                        mike

                                         



                                        ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                        That's interesting.  I was going to unreservedly recommend bow and stern anchors before reading your post.  Of course, an unballasted 14' 5" Michalak Philsboat birdwatcher and a 41' Morgan are chalk and cheese.


                                        I anchor my Philsboat parallel to the shore, fore and aft on long scopes.  I leave the offset centreboard down to stop roll and the tiller to lee, so that the rudder is constantly trying to turn the boat into the wind.


                                        I've slept relatively comfortably this way on the windward side in winds gusting to 25 knots, because the open slot was parallel to the on-shore wind, so I was sheltered under the slot decks.


                                        I've also anchored stern too, which stops yawing, but I found the wave slap on the stern to be very annoying and of course the wind comes straight through the slot.


                                        So for my situation, anchoring side on rather than fore and aft, seems to be the best solution.


                                        Cheers,


                                        Rob.



                                        ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                        Careful with that stern anchor. I once anchored a Morgan 41 OI. fore and aft in Longboat Pass in Fl.
                                        We woke up at dawn with the boat sideways to a falling tide with both rodes tight as a drum . The tide runs about 4 knots and the boat was healed about 30 degrees. The lines were so tight I could not free them from the cleats. I tied a boat cushion to the aft line and cut it with a knife. It acted like a cut bow string. When the boat swung straight I used the dink to retrieve the aft anchor and rode.I then motored up on the bow anchor ,created slack and free the line from the cleat. the Anchor was so embedded in the sand bottom I had to motor over it to dislodge it.
                                        Never made that mistake again. BTW  almost all sinkings of small boats are cause by waves entering the boat from the stern being held down by a stern anchor. Careful . Rocky
                                        From: "Mark Albanese" <marka97203@...>
                                        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Sunday, October 13, 2013 6:46:30 AM
                                        Subject: [bolger] RE: AS-29 for sale

                                         

                                        I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with a BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.

                                        It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode would help.

                                        Funny, when I mentioned the swing to another old salt, one who sails a Witholtz cat boat, he shrugged and said not to worry, they all do that.

                                        The big house is a good sized sail. Next time I'll simply try a second anchor over the stern.

                                        marka

                                        On Oct 12, 2013 5:12 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:
                                         

                                        The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                                         

                                        From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                                        Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                                        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                         

                                         

                                        Mike,

                                        It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                                        A. Sobriquet



                                        ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                        This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                                        ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                                        We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                                        Thanks,

                                        Connie

                                      • otter55806
                                        What happened to boaters using the Bahamian moor when in tidal waters? You have two anchors down, 180 degrees to each other, but both from the bow, not
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Oct 14, 2013
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                                          What happened to boaters using the Bahamian moor when in tidal waters? You have two anchors down, 180 degrees to each other, but both from the bow, not anchored bow and stern. This more or less keeps your boat in the same spot of it's own length, just swinging from the central pivot point at the bow. Of course, one can't always anchor the way they should because when you go into an anchorage and find everyone else anchored with only one bow anchor on, maybe, 100' of rode they are going to shift 200' when the tide or wind changes. If everyone is anchored the same you all shift.  If you are dumb enough to anchor in the middle of a bunch of boats and anchor in a way you don't shift and they do, they will hit you. This is why I will go out of my way to anchor way away from everyone else. So that I can anchor correctly, which also means not anchoring downwind, down tide of any of these boats that will potentially drag.
                                          As usual all boats are a tradeoff. Shallow draft is wonderful, but having little underwater structure they will skate around.  Just another reason to anchor away from everyone else. Again, you have the responsibility to make sure your boat won't shift and hit a boat that does not skate around. In a perfect world all boats would anchor the same, with the same rode, and would all shift exactly the same. There is not perfect world. With my current boat having a very shallow draft not only do I stay well away from the crowd, but I try to anchor in shallow enough water that all the big boats will ground out before they can ever drag down on me. Just one more advantage of very shoal draft boats. LOL! Granted, this cannot always be done. In the skinny waters of the gulf, with very little tide, it can. With a nice clear, flat sand bottom I sometimes just let the boat take the ground when the tide goes out. A nice simple way of making sure you stay put.  This is still often used in Europe, and why you see so many bilge keels. Doesn't work with the average fin keel and spade rudder, which is why I would never own one of those.  May be great for the sailing part, not very good for the gunkhole cruiser anchor in shallow water part. This is where Phil's boats shine!
                                          I think owning an AS 29 would be great, but If I spent the money buying her I wouldn't have the money to use and maintain her :(
                                          Bob
                                          Bob

                                           



                                          ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                          That's interesting.  I was going to unreservedly recommend bow and stern anchors before reading your post.  Of course, an unballasted 14' 5" Michalak Philsboat birdwatcher and a 41' Morgan are chalk and cheese.


                                          I anchor my Philsboat parallel to the shore, fore and aft on long scopes.  I leave the offset centreboard down to stop roll and the tiller to lee, so that the rudder is constantly trying to turn the boat into the wind.


                                          I've slept relatively comfortably this way on the windward side in winds gusting to 25 knots, because the open slot was parallel to the on-shore wind, so I was sheltered under the slot decks.


                                          I've also anchored stern too, which stops yawing, but I found the wave slap on the stern to be very annoying and of course the wind comes straight through the slot.


                                          So for my situation, anchoring side on rather than fore and aft, seems to be the best solution.


                                          Cheers,


                                          Rob.



                                          ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                          Careful with that stern anchor. I once anchored a Morgan 41 OI. fore and aft in Longboat Pass in Fl.
                                          We woke up at dawn with the boat sideways to a falling tide with both rodes tight as a drum . The tide runs about 4 knots and the boat was healed about 30 degrees. The lines were so tight I could not free them from the cleats. I tied a boat cushion to the aft line and cut it with a knife. It acted like a cut bow string. When the boat swung straight I used the dink to retrieve the aft anchor and rode.I then motored up on the bow anchor ,created slack and free the line from the cleat. the Anchor was so embedded in the sand bottom I had to motor over it to dislodge it.
                                          Never made that mistake again. BTW  almost all sinkings of small boats are cause by waves entering the boat from the stern being held down by a stern anchor. Careful . Rocky
                                          From: "Mark Albanese" <marka97203@...>
                                          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Sunday, October 13, 2013 6:46:30 AM
                                          Subject: [bolger] RE: AS-29 for sale

                                           

                                          I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with a BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.

                                          It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode would help.

                                          Funny, when I mentioned the swing to another old salt, one who sails a Witholtz cat boat, he shrugged and said not to worry, they all do that.

                                          The big house is a good sized sail. Next time I'll simply try a second anchor over the stern.

                                          marka

                                          On Oct 12, 2013 5:12 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:
                                           

                                          The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                                           

                                          From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                                          Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                                          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                           

                                           

                                          Mike,

                                          It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                                          A. Sobriquet



                                          ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                          This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                                          ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                                          We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                                          Thanks,

                                          Connie

                                        • Connor, Patrick
                                          This is how we always moored in the Bahamas or anywhere with a significant tidal flow. Sent from my iPhone ... This is how we always moored in the Bahamas or
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Oct 14, 2013
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                                            This is how we always moored in the Bahamas or anywhere with a significant tidal flow. 

                                            Sent from my iPhone

                                            On Oct 14, 2013, at 10:16 AM, "otter55806@..." <otter55806@...> wrote:

                                             

                                            What happened to boaters using the Bahamian moor when in tidal waters? You have two anchors down, 180 degrees to each other, but both from the bow, not anchored bow and stern. This more or less keeps your boat in the same spot of it's own length, just swinging from the central pivot point at the bow. Of course, one can't always anchor the way they should because when you go into an anchorage and find everyone else anchored with only one bow anchor on, maybe, 100' of rode they are going to shift 200' when the tide or wind changes. If everyone is anchored the same you all shift.  If you are dumb enough to anchor in the middle of a bunch of boats and anchor in a way you don't shift and they do, they will hit you. This is why I will go out of my way to anchor way away from everyone else. So that I can anchor correctly, which also means not anchoring downwind, down tide of any of these boats that will potentially drag.
                                            As usual all boats are a tradeoff. Shallow draft is wonderful, but having little underwater structure they will skate around.  Just another reason to anchor away from everyone else. Again, you have the responsibility to make sure your boat won't shift and hit a boat that does not skate around. In a perfect world all boats would anchor the same, with the same rode, and would all shift exactly the same. There is not perfect world. With my current boat having a very shallow draft not only do I stay well away from the crowd, but I try to anchor in shallow enough water that all the big boats will ground out before they can ever drag down on me. Just one more advantage of very shoal draft boats. LOL! Granted, this cannot always be done. In the skinny waters of the gulf, with very little tide, it can. With a nice clear, flat sand bottom I sometimes just let the boat take the ground when the tide goes out. A nice simple way of making sure you stay put.  This is still often used in Europe, and why you see so many bilge keels. Doesn't work with the average fin keel and spade rudder, which is why I would never own one of those.  May be great for the sailing part, not very good for the gunkhole cruiser anchor in shallow water part. This is where Phil's boats shine!
                                            I think owning an AS 29 would be great, but If I spent the money buying her I wouldn't have the money to use and maintain her :(
                                            Bob
                                            Bob

                                             



                                            ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                            That's interesting.  I was going to unreservedly recommend bow and stern anchors before reading your post.  Of course, an unballasted 14' 5" Michalak Philsboat birdwatcher and a 41' Morgan are chalk and cheese.


                                            I anchor my Philsboat parallel to the shore, fore and aft on long scopes.  I leave the offset centreboard down to stop roll and the tiller to lee, so that the rudder is constantly trying to turn the boat into the wind.


                                            I've slept relatively comfortably this way on the windward side in winds gusting to 25 knots, because the open slot was parallel to the on-shore wind, so I was sheltered under the slot decks.


                                            I've also anchored stern too, which stops yawing, but I found the wave slap on the stern to be very annoying and of course the wind comes straight through the slot.


                                            So for my situation, anchoring side on rather than fore and aft, seems to be the best solution.


                                            Cheers,


                                            Rob.



                                            ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                            Careful with that stern anchor. I once anchored a Morgan 41 OI. fore and aft in Longboat Pass in Fl.
                                            We woke up at dawn with the boat sideways to a falling tide with both rodes tight as a drum . The tide runs about 4 knots and the boat was healed about 30 degrees. The lines were so tight I could not free them from the cleats. I tied a boat cushion to the aft line and cut it with a knife. It acted like a cut bow string. When the boat swung straight I used the dink to retrieve the aft anchor and rode.I then motored up on the bow anchor ,created slack and free the line from the cleat. the Anchor was so embedded in the sand bottom I had to motor over it to dislodge it.
                                            Never made that mistake again. BTW  almost all sinkings of small boats are cause by waves entering the boat from the stern being held down by a stern anchor. Careful . Rocky
                                            From: "Mark Albanese" <marka97203@...>
                                            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                            Sent: Sunday, October 13, 2013 6:46:30 AM
                                            Subject: [bolger] RE: AS-29 for sale

                                             

                                            I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with a BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.

                                            It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode would help.

                                            Funny, when I mentioned the swing to another old salt, one who sails a Witholtz cat boat, he shrugged and said not to worry, they all do that.

                                            The big house is a good sized sail. Next time I'll simply try a second anchor over the stern.

                                            marka

                                            On Oct 12, 2013 5:12 PM, "Mason Smith" <goodboat@...> wrote:
                                             

                                            The question of boats “yawing” at anchor interests me if I understand what M. soubriquet means by yawing. My Birdwatchers would swing almost 180 degrees around their anchors or a drogue, reaching high sideways speeds in the middle of the swing. Birdwatcher would take the head off a swimmer who ventured into its arc. I came to think that the hull became a foil, and developed a high- and a low-pressure side, each way. If that is the physics of yawing or swinging to a mooring, the relief might come from thwarting air flow over one side: rigging a baffle or spoiler of some kind on one forequarter. What do more expert sailors think?

                                             

                                            From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of a.sobriquet@...
                                            Sent: Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:45 AM
                                            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                            Subject: [bolger] RE: RE: AS-29 for sale

                                             

                                             

                                            Mike,

                                            It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?

                                            A. Sobriquet



                                            ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                            This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare becaus e of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.



                                            ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                                            We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182

                                            Thanks,

                                            Connie

                                          • John Kohnen
                                            I poked around and found what John W had to say about using a bucket to reduce sailing around when anchored. The meat picked off the bones of message #57452
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Oct 15, 2013
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                                              I poked around and found what John W had to say about using a bucket to
                                              reduce sailing around when anchored. The meat picked off the bones of
                                              message #57452 over on the Duckworks group:

                                              "... get a bucket with a strong handle, and put it on the anchor rode
                                              about 2 m out from the bow so its acting as a water brake, it should
                                              greatly reduce the sheering around."

                                              ...

                                              "I put a light line and a heavy shackle around the buckets handle and tie
                                              it to the anchor rode with a rolling hitch.

                                              "Yes it does need to be heavy enough to sink down to where the open mouth
                                              is able to provide the braking effect, thats what the shackle is there for.

                                              "Another thing that can help is if you can trim the boat bow down at
                                              anchor by moving weight forward. Boats with a mast well forward are a bit
                                              prone to this behavior as the static windage is not far enough aft to keep
                                              it straight."

                                              John Welsford

                                              On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 12:33:23 -0700, I wrote:

                                              > The bucket is full of water, because it's submerged, and it's slung from
                                              > the rode near the bow of the boat. I suppose it could be slung right off
                                              > the bow on a separate line. I think I picked up that tip from John
                                              > Welsford on one of the groups he frequents. I haven't tried it out
                                              > myself...
                                              >
                                              > On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 03:46:30 -0700, Mark A wrote:
                                              >
                                              >> I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with
                                              >> a
                                              >> BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.
                                              >>
                                              >> It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode
                                              >> would
                                              >> help.
                                              >> ...
                                              >


                                              --
                                              John (jkohnen@...)
                                              He got hold of the red meat of the language and turned it into hamburgers.
                                              (Richard Gordon on Ernest Hemingway)
                                            • jdmeddock
                                              Some boats have good behavior when anchored and some don t. Not sure bad anchor behavior can be attributed to any specific design trait. My old 27 plastic
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Oct 15, 2013
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                                                Some boats have good behavior when anchored and some don't.

                                                Not sure bad anchor behavior can be attributed to any specific design trait.


                                                My old 27' plastic sailboat would charge around like a chained pit bull when anchored.

                                                In winds over about 12kts, it would sail forward at an angle until the anchor snubbed it with a jerk.

                                                The jerk would tack the boat and it would then charge off in the other direction.

                                                It weighed 8000# and had 5' draft and plenty of submersed volume.  

                                                I never anchored any where there was any significant current.


                                                I would wake up any time I didn't feel the thump every minute or so.


                                                Tried tying the RIB off the stern as a motion damper/drogue, just bashed the dinghy around a lot.

                                                An anchor riding sail was reported to be the cure for this boat.

                                                I cut down an old storm jib to hank on the backstay and sheet to a winch but I never tried it,


                                                justin




                                                ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <jhkohnen@...> wrote:

                                                I poked around and found what John W had to say about using a bucket to
                                                reduce sailing around when anchored. The meat picked off the bones of
                                                message #57452 over on the Duckworks group:

                                                "... get a bucket with a strong handle, and put it on the anchor rode
                                                about 2 m out from the bow so its acting as a water brake, it should
                                                greatly reduce the sheering around."

                                                ...

                                                "I put a light line and a heavy shackle around the buckets handle and tie
                                                it to the anchor rode with a rolling hitch.

                                                "Yes it does need to be heavy enough to sink down to where the open mouth
                                                is able to provide the braking effect, thats what the shackle is there for.

                                                "Another thing that can help is if you can trim the boat bow down at
                                                anchor by moving weight forward. Boats with a mast well forward are a bit
                                                prone to this behavior as the static windage is not far enough aft to keep
                                                it straight."

                                                John Welsford

                                                On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 12:33:23 -0700, I wrote:

                                                > The bucket is full of water, because it's submerged, and it's slung from
                                                > the rode near the bow of the boat. I suppose it could be slung right off
                                                > the bow on a separate line. I think I picked up that tip from John
                                                > Welsford on one of the groups he frequents. I haven't tried it out
                                                > myself...
                                                >
                                                > On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 03:46:30 -0700, Mark A wrote:
                                                >
                                                >> I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with
                                                >> a
                                                >> BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.
                                                >>
                                                >> It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode
                                                >> would
                                                >> help.
                                                >> ...
                                                >


                                                --
                                                John (jkohnen@...)
                                                He got hold of the red meat of the language and turned it into hamburgers.
                                                (Richard Gordon on Ernest Hemingway)
                                              • mkriley48
                                                my triton sailed a lot at anchor. use a piece of line attached with a rolling hitch about 10 feet in front of the bow on the anchor line, bring it back to a
                                                Message 23 of 24 , Oct 16, 2013
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                                                  my triton sailed a lot at anchor.

                                                  use a piece of line attached with a rolling hitch about 10 feet in front of the bow

                                                  on the anchor line, bring it back to a cockpit winch and crank in until it stops sailing. This happens at 20 degrees usually but varies according to conditions.

                                                  I lived  a year at anchor  with out going to a dock once.



                                                  ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                  Some boats have good behavior when anchored and some don't.

                                                  Not sure bad anchor behavior can be attributed to any specific design trait.


                                                  My old 27' plastic sailboat would charge around like a chained pit bull when anchored.

                                                  In winds over about 12kts, it would sail forward at an angle until the anchor snubbed it with a jerk.

                                                  The jerk would tack the boat and it would then charge off in the other direction.

                                                  It weighed 8000# and had 5' draft and plenty of submersed volume.  

                                                  I never anchored any where there was any significant current.


                                                  I would wake up any time I didn't feel the thump every minute or so.


                                                  Tried tying the RIB off the stern as a motion damper/drogue, just bashed the dinghy around a lot.

                                                  An anchor riding sail was reported to be the cure for this boat.

                                                  I cut down an old storm jib to hank on the backstay and sheet to a winch but I never tried it,


                                                  justin




                                                  ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <jhkohnen@...> wrote:

                                                  I poked around and found what John W had to say about using a bucket to
                                                  reduce sailing around when anchored. The meat picked off the bones of
                                                  message #57452 over on the Duckworks group:

                                                  "... get a bucket with a strong handle, and put it on the anchor rode
                                                  about 2 m out from the bow so its acting as a water brake, it should
                                                  greatly reduce the sheering around."

                                                  ...

                                                  "I put a light line and a heavy shackle around the buckets handle and tie
                                                  it to the anchor rode with a rolling hitch.

                                                  "Yes it does need to be heavy enough to sink down to where the open mouth
                                                  is able to provide the braking effect, thats what the shackle is there for.

                                                  "Another thing that can help is if you can trim the boat bow down at
                                                  anchor by moving weight forward. Boats with a mast well forward are a bit
                                                  prone to this behavior as the static windage is not far enough aft to keep
                                                  it straight."

                                                  John Welsford

                                                  On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 12:33:23 -0700, I wrote:

                                                  > The bucket is full of water, because it's submerged, and it's slung from
                                                  > the rode near the bow of the boat. I suppose it could be slung right off
                                                  > the bow on a separate line. I think I picked up that tip from John
                                                  > Welsford on one of the groups he frequents. I haven't tried it out
                                                  > myself...
                                                  >
                                                  > On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 03:46:30 -0700, Mark A wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  >> I'm not a more expert sailor, but can say my Michalak Jewelbox Jr. with
                                                  >> a
                                                  >> BW top rhythmically swings ever bit of 180 degrees.
                                                  >>
                                                  >> It was suggested to me that a full bucket slung from along the rode
                                                  >> would
                                                  >> help.
                                                  >> ...
                                                  >


                                                  --
                                                  John (jkohnen@...)
                                                  He got hold of the red meat of the language and turned it into hamburgers.
                                                  (Richard Gordon on Ernest Hemingway)
                                                • futabachan
                                                  I would think that the anti-slamming shoe would be retrofittable if you could brace the boat up somewhere such that the entire area covered by the shoe were
                                                  Message 24 of 24 , Oct 17, 2013
                                                  • 0 Attachment

                                                    I would think that the anti-slamming shoe would be retrofittable if you could brace the boat up somewhere such that the entire area covered by the shoe were free of supports. The I60 has something similar, and from what I can make out from the plans, it's just a bunch of plywood ovals laminated up and then sanded. If you attached one at a time under the forefoot, and sanded at the end of the process, I'd think you'd be able to retrofit one to an existing boat. But I've never tried it.

                                                     



                                                    ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                    We really didn't solve these problems. We never found them severe enough to put much work or money into solving them. With Walkure, you have a wide range of spots to anchor, since you can anchor in less than 2 feet of water. We just picked spots with no chop and no wind and tide opposed. We did find one spot where the pounding got quite severe - Key West mooring field. It's wide open to north winds and we had 4 straight days of 4 foot chop in the mooring field. Yuck!

                                                    Bolger solved the pounding problem with an upgraded version of the AS-29 that had a rounded section added under the bow. This allowed for more comfortable anchoring. It would likely have to be done during construction and not as a retrofit. It's not on Walkure.

                                                    We never found the "anchor dance" - yawing - to be at all annoying. If the water was deep enough, we put a board down, which slowed the motion a lot. Otherwise, we just got used to it. It's not nearly as pronounced on the AS-29 as it is on a MacGreggor or a Hunter. We've seen 40 foot Hunters dancing to and fro like mad while we sat relatively still.

                                                    You can set the mizzen as a riding sail, and it helps, but mostly we didn't bother.



                                                    On Saturday, October 12, 2013 9:44 AM, "a.sobriquet@..." <a.sobriquet@...> wrote:
                                                     
                                                    Mike,
                                                    It's been said that AS-xx sharpies pound at anchor in a chop, and that they yaw at anchor if they don't carry a riding sail -- and that they yaw even with a riding sail if wind and tide are contrary. How did you solve those problems on Walkure?
                                                    A. Sobriquet


                                                    ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <bolger@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                                    This is the boat that I built and sailed on the Hudson River, the Erie canal, Lake Ontario, Huron, Michigan, Georgian Bay, North Channel, Mississippi River, Ohio River, Tenn-Tom Waterway, the Gulf of Mexico from Mobile to the Keys, the ICW from the Keys to the Chesapeake. We sold her a while back to move to a bigger boat that was given to us. We were happy that she would be used and cared for, but sad to lose her. There are times when we miss this great little boat. She'll get you into anchorages no other sailboat would dare because of her shallow draft. She'll never give you worries about low bridges. If you are thinking about buying Walkure, you can contact me for details on her construction, etc. Shortly before his death, we visited Phil Bolger and showed him pictures and he approved. He commented that the cut of her mainsail was about perfect, just what he designed. Any owner of this boat will never want for attention from an admiring public.


                                                    ---In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <euriskocreekmore@...> wrote:

                                                    We are selling our AS-29. Specifics can be found at http://simplysailingonline.com/index.php?page=ss182
                                                    Thanks,
                                                    Connie


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