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FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som

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  • c.ruzer
    Merlin a 23 1.5x scale-up of Sweet Pea About Merlin: looks great sails great class act of the fleet knock out going to
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 22, 2013
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      "Merlin" a 23' 1.5x scale-up of "Sweet Pea"

      About Merlin: <SNIPPED COMMENTS>
      "looks great"
      "sails great"
      "class act of the fleet"
      "knock out"
      "going to windward like a train"
      "a big, ballasted centerboard and a big square fixed rudder on a skeg"
      "drew around 18-22" with the board up and that was at the rudder"
      "may have had some additional internal ballast"
      "rudder and skeg appeared to be ~1/4" flat aluminum plate"
      "~6hp Tohatsu in a well mounted forward of the rudder"
      "Rig is a wooden mast, owner-built, in a tabernacle. It's a simple rig, four stays with no spreaders"
      "big low-aspect main and what looks to be a ~115% masthead jib on hanks. Not complicated at all."
      "used Bolger's lines for the hull shape and designed everything else himself"
      "The cabin is completely open at the aft end, making the cabin and cockpit one continuous space. The hard dodger could have plastic windows fitted to enclose everything in case of cold or wet. She had two good berths, a small galley with sink and stove, and that's about all I remember."
      "Only criticism I have of the build is minor: He used plain old sand to make the decks non-skid. And non-skid they are! But they would be hard one's bare feet and knees if you liked to sail that way. Otherwise, I'd say Merlin is about as close to perfect as you could get. I just found my notes and Merlin's builder is David Ware of Rockport, Texas. Really nice fellow and very patient to explain about his boat."

      http://cultofku.com/imagehost/images/57129890730403507571.jpg
      from
      http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?127297-Talk-me-out-of-Michalak-s-Frolic2&s=e878c0b59ca3730fcd9120c8562c0728&p=2894903#post2894903
    • Ross
      C.Ruzer, I m interested in any more information. I have long been taken by the lines of Sweet Pea , and to make things worse (or better??), I have just
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 25, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        C.Ruzer,

        I'm interested in any more information. I have long been taken by the lines of "Sweet Pea", and to make things worse (or better??), I have just received my copy of the book, "Albert Strange on Yacht Designing, Construction, and Cruising". Just think about "Cherub II" and "Sheila".

        You can get me at "r dot lillistone (at) gmail dot com" or I can contact you if preferred.

        Phil Bolger was, and still is, my most important teacher, despite the wealth of information out there from which we can all benefit written by others.

        Ross Lillistone

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@...> wrote:
        >
        > "Merlin" a 23' 1.5x scale-up of "Sweet Pea"
        >
        > About Merlin: <SNIPPED COMMENTS>
        > "looks great"
        > "sails great"
        > "class act of the fleet"
        > "knock out"
        > "going to windward like a train"
        > "a big, ballasted centerboard and a big square fixed rudder on a skeg"
        > "drew around 18-22" with the board up and that was at the rudder"
        > "may have had some additional internal ballast"
        > "rudder and skeg appeared to be ~1/4" flat aluminum plate"
        > "~6hp Tohatsu in a well mounted forward of the rudder"
        > "Rig is a wooden mast, owner-built, in a tabernacle. It's a simple rig, four stays with no spreaders"
        > "big low-aspect main and what looks to be a ~115% masthead jib on hanks. Not complicated at all."
        > "used Bolger's lines for the hull shape and designed everything else himself"
        > "The cabin is completely open at the aft end, making the cabin and cockpit one continuous space. The hard dodger could have plastic windows fitted to enclose everything in case of cold or wet. She had two good berths, a small galley with sink and stove, and that's about all I remember."
        > "Only criticism I have of the build is minor: He used plain old sand to make the decks non-skid. And non-skid they are! But they would be hard one's bare feet and knees if you liked to sail that way. Otherwise, I'd say Merlin is about as close to perfect as you could get. I just found my notes and Merlin's builder is David Ware of Rockport, Texas. Really nice fellow and very patient to explain about his boat."
        >
        > http://cultofku.com/imagehost/images/57129890730403507571.jpg
        > from
        > http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?127297-Talk-me-out-of-Michalak-s-Frolic2&s=e878c0b59ca3730fcd9120c8562c0728&p=2894903#post2894903
        >
      • John Boy
        Ross, The gentleman who built this boat is from Texas and has sailed it in the Texas200 and the Florida120.  If you re on facebook, join the Texas 200 Sailing
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 25, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Ross,
          The gentleman who built this boat is from Texas and has sailed it in the Texas200 and the Florida120.  If you're on facebook, join the Texas 200 Sailing Club group and inquire about it.  I'm certain someone knows how to contact the builder and can share his information with you.  https://www.facebook.com/groups/100346820013471/

          BTW I love your Egret design.  I'm building a Michalak Normsboat right now but plan to build a full scale Egret in 3-5 years.  I've been drooling over Chapelle's, Sucher's, and Parkers version of the Egret for a couple of decades.
          John Boy
           



          “Seaward ho! Hang the treasure! It's the glory of the sea that has turned my head.” 
          Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island


          From: Ross <bsam9350@...>
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 5:35 AM
          Subject: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som

           
          C.Ruzer,

          I'm interested in any more information. I have long been taken by the lines of "Sweet Pea", and to make things worse (or better??), I have just received my copy of the book, "Albert Strange on Yacht Designing, Construction, and Cruising". Just think about "Cherub II" and "Sheila".

          You can get me at "r dot lillistone (at) gmail dot com" or I can contact you if preferred.

          Phil Bolger was, and still is, my most important teacher, despite the wealth of information out there from which we can all benefit written by others.

          Ross Lillistone

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@...> wrote:
          >
          > "Merlin" a 23' 1.5x scale-up of "Sweet Pea"
          >
          > About Merlin: <SNIPPED COMMENTS>
          > "looks great"
          > "sails great"
          > "class act of the fleet"
          > "knock out"
          > "going to windward like a train"
          > "a big, ballasted centerboard and a big square fixed rudder on a skeg"
          > "drew around 18-22" with the board up and that was at the rudder"
          > "may have had some additional internal ballast"
          > "rudder and skeg appeared to be ~1/4" flat aluminum plate"
          > "~6hp Tohatsu in a well mounted forward of the rudder"
          > "Rig is a wooden mast, owner-built, in a tabernacle. It's a simple rig, four stays with no spreaders"
          > "big low-aspect main and what looks to be a ~115% masthead jib on hanks. Not complicated at all."
          > "used Bolger's lines for the hull shape and designed everything else himself"
          > "The cabin is completely open at the aft end, making the cabin and cockpit one continuous space. The hard dodger could have plastic windows fitted to enclose everything in case of cold or wet. She had two good berths, a small galley with sink and stove, and that's about all I remember."
          > "Only criticism I have of the build is minor: He used plain old sand to make the decks non-skid. And non-skid they are! But they would be hard one's bare feet and knees if you liked to sail that way. Otherwise, I'd say Merlin is about as close to perfect as you could get. I just found my notes and Merlin's builder is David Ware of Rockport, Texas. Really nice fellow and very patient to explain about his boat."
          >
          > http://cultofku.com/imagehost/images/57129890730403507571.jpg
          > from
          > http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?127297-Talk-me-out-of-Michalak-s-Frolic2&s=e878c0b59ca3730fcd9120c8562c0728&p=2894903#post2894903
          >



        • Ross
          Bob, Thanks for the reminder about Plywood Canoe Yawl - I m going to re-read the SBJ cartoon article tonight and do some thinking. Yes, I have a copy of
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 26, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Bob,

            Thanks for the reminder about "Plywood Canoe Yawl" - I'm going to re-read the SBJ cartoon article tonight and do some thinking. Yes, I have a copy of "Holmes of the Humber" as well as the Albert Strange book already mentioned. I've been trying to get hold of a copy of the earlier John Leather publication about Albert Strange, but second-hand copies seem to command $350 prices. Luckily, I do have a copy of the superb little John Leather book, "Sail and Oar", which has a chapter about A.S. and "Cherub II", as well as lots of other reading.

            John Boy,

            I'll look up the Texas 200 Sailing Group - thanks for the lead. I'm not usually a fan of simply scaling an existing design, but this one seems to be well worth some arm-chair time. I know that the "Sweet Pea" design has been published in BWAOM, Woodenboat Magazine, and Harold Payson's Instant Boatbuilding, but I would write to Susanne Altenburger if ever I decided to build anything. It is unlikely, but I find the hull proportions to be an almost perfect fit with my fantasies about sailing at the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century.

            Thank-you for the comments about "Little Egret". A close examination of all of my designs will reveal clear evidence of what I have learned from the writing and published designs of Phil Bolger. My education started with my father, then moved to William Atkin, Howard Chapelle, L. Francis Herreshoff and countless others as I struggled to learn.

            I continue to be educated in the field and entertained by the work of scores or even hundreds of people - but without any doubt, Phil Bolger has exercised my mind in a way which not only taught me an enormous amount of information, but his thoughts gave me a key to unlock much of what was hidden in the work of the other masters, and would otherwise have remained hidden to me. Thank-you, Phil!

            Ross Lillistone

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, John Boy <t1ro2003@...> wrote:
            >
            > Ross,
            > The gentleman who built this boat is from Texas and has sailed it in the Texas200 and the Florida120.  If you're on facebook, join the Texas 200 Sailing Club group and inquire about it.  I'm certain someone knows how to contact the builder and can share his information with you.  https://www.facebook.com/groups/100346820013471/
            >
            > BTW I love your Egret design.  I'm building a Michalak Normsboat right now but plan to build a full scale Egret in 3-5 years.  I've been drooling over Chapelle's, Sucher's, and Parkers version of the Egret for a couple of decades.
            > John Boy
            >  
            >
            >
            > I have a blog!  http://toon2sailor.blogspot.com/
            >
            > “Seaward ho! Hang the treasure! It's the glory of the sea that has turned my head.” 
            >
            > Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Ross <bsam9350@...>
            > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 5:35 AM
            > Subject: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som
            >
            >
            >  
            > C.Ruzer,
            >
            > I'm interested in any more information. I have long been taken by the lines of "Sweet Pea", and to make things worse (or better??), I have just received my copy of the book, "Albert Strange on Yacht Designing, Construction, and Cruising". Just think about "Cherub II" and "Sheila".
            >
            > You can get me at "r dot lillistone (at) gmail dot com" or I can contact you if preferred.
            >
            > Phil Bolger was, and still is, my most important teacher, despite the wealth of information out there from which we can all benefit written by others.
            >
            > Ross Lillistone
            >
            > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@> wrote:
            > >
            > > "Merlin" a 23' 1.5x scale-up of "Sweet Pea"
            > >
            > > About Merlin: <SNIPPED COMMENTS>
            > > "looks great"
            > > "sails great"
            > > "class act of the fleet"
            > > "knock out"
            > > "going to windward like a train"
            > > "a big, ballasted centerboard and a big square fixed rudder on a skeg"
            > > "drew around 18-22" with the board up and that was at the rudder"
            > > "may have had some additional internal ballast"
            > > "rudder and skeg appeared to be ~1/4" flat aluminum plate"
            > > "~6hp Tohatsu in a well mounted forward of the rudder"
            > > "Rig is a wooden mast, owner-built, in a tabernacle. It's a simple rig, four stays with no spreaders"
            > > "big low-aspect main and what looks to be a ~115% masthead jib on hanks. Not complicated at all."
            > > "used Bolger's lines for the hull shape and designed everything else himself"
            > > "The cabin is completely open at the aft end, making the cabin and cockpit one continuous space. The hard dodger could have plastic windows fitted to enclose everything in case of cold or wet. She had two good berths, a small galley with sink and stove, and that's about all I remember."
            > > "Only criticism I have of the build is minor: He used plain old sand to make the decks non-skid. And non-skid they are! But they would be hard one's bare feet and knees if you liked to sail that way. Otherwise, I'd say Merlin is about as close to perfect as you could get. I just found my notes and Merlin's builder is David Ware of Rockport, Texas. Really nice fellow and very patient to explain about his boat."
            > >
            > > http://cultofku.com/imagehost/images/57129890730403507571.jpg
            > > from
            > > http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?127297-Talk-me-out-of-Michalak-s-Frolic2&s=e878c0b59ca3730fcd9120c8562c0728&p=2894903#post2894903
            > >
            >
          • John Trussell
            I spent a lot of time drooling over the Plywood Canoe Yawl. PCB pointed out that it was too small for most human beings. (Like PCB’s exquisite Monhegan and
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 26, 2013
            • 0 Attachment

              I spent a lot of time drooling over the Plywood Canoe Yawl. PCB pointed out that it was too small for most human beings. (Like PCB’s exquisite Monhegan  and the Cape Dory Typhoon). He also said it would be a better boat if the full keel were cut off and replaced with a flat bottom, some sort of keel/centerboard, and ballast. If this were done, the hill would superficially resemble Sweet Pea. However, simply scaling a boat up (or down) can result in all sorts of issues to include appropriate freeboard, scantlings, framing, and efficient use of plywood (and many others). None of these are insurmountable, but they do complicate the process…

               

              JohnT  

               


              From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto: bolger@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ross
              Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 6:50 AM
              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som

               

               

              Bob,

              Thanks for the reminder about "Plywood Canoe Yawl" - I'm going to re-read the SBJ cartoon article tonight and do some thinking. Yes, I have a copy of "Holmes of the Humber " as well as the Albert Strange book already mentioned. I've been trying to get hold of a copy of the earlier John Leather publication about Albert Strange, but second-hand copies seem to command $350 prices. Luckily, I do have a copy of the superb little John Leather book, "Sail and Oar", which has a chapter about A.S. and "Cherub II", as well as lots of other reading.

              John Boy,

              I'll look up the Texas 200 Sailing Group - thanks for the lead. I'm not usually a fan of simply scaling an existing design, but this one seems to be well worth some arm-chair time. I know that the "Sweet Pea" design has been published in BWAOM, Woodenboat Magazine, and Harold Payson's Instant Boatbuilding, but I would write to Susanne Altenburger if ever I decided to build anything. It is unlikely, but I find the hull proportions to be an almost perfect fit with my fantasies about sailing at the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century.

              Thank-you for the comments about "Little Egret". A close examination of all of my designs will reveal clear evidence of what I have learned from the writing and published designs of Phil Bolger. My education started with my father, then moved to William Atkin, Howard Chapelle, L. Francis Herreshoff and countless others as I struggled to learn.

              I continue to be educated in the field and entertained by the work of scores or even hundreds of people - but without any doubt, Phil Bolger has exercised my mind in a way which not only taught me an enormous amount of information, but his thoughts gave me a key to unlock much of what was hidden in the work of the other masters, and would otherwise have remained hidden to me. Thank-you, Phil!

              Ross Lillistone

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, John Boy <t1ro2003@...> wrote:

              >
              > Ross,
              > The gentleman who built this boat is from
              w:st="on">Texas and has sailed it in the Texas200 and the Florida120.  If you're on facebook, join the Texas 200 Sailing Club group and inquire about it.  I'm certain someone knows how to contact the builder and can share his information with you.  https://www.facebook.com/groups/100346820013471/
              >
              > BTW I love your Egret design.  I'm building a Michalak Normsboat
              right now but plan to build a full scale Egret in 3-5 years.  I've been drooling over Chapelle's, Sucher's, and Parkers version of the Egret for a couple of decades.
              > John Boy
              >  
              >
              >
              > I have a blog!  http://toon2sailor.blogspot.com/
              >
              > “Seaward ho! Hang the treasure! It's the glory of the sea that has
              turned my head.” 
              >
              > Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Ross <bsam9350@...>
              > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 5:35 AM
              > Subject: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't
              say? Hmmm... now that's som
              >
              >
              >  
              > C.Ruzer,
              >
              > I'm interested in any more information. I have long been taken by the lines
              of "Sweet Pea", and to make things worse (or better??), I have just received my copy of the book, "Albert Strange on Yacht Designing, Construction, and Cruising". Just think about "Cherub II" and "Sheila".
              >
              > You can get me at "r dot lillistone (at) gmail dot com" or I can
              contact you if preferred.
              >
              > Phil Bolger was, and still is, my most important teacher, despite the
              wealth of information out there from which we can all benefit written by others.
              >
              > Ross Lillistone
              >
              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com,
              "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@> wrote:
              > >
              > > "Merlin" a 23' 1.5x scale-up of "Sweet Pea"
              > >
              > > About Merlin: <SNIPPED COMMENTS>
              > > "looks great"
              > > "sails great"
              > > "class act of the fleet"
              > > "knock out"
              > > "going to windward like a train"
              > > "a big, ballasted centerboard and a big square fixed rudder on a
              skeg"
              > > "drew around 18-22" with the board up and that was at the
              rudder"
              > > "may have had some additional internal ballast"
              > > "rudder and skeg appeared to be ~1/4" flat aluminum
              plate"
              > > "~6hp Tohatsu in a well mounted forward of the rudder"
              > > "Rig is a wooden mast, owner-built, in a tabernacle. It's a
              simple rig, four stays with no spreaders"
              > > "big low-aspect main and what looks to be a ~115% masthead jib
              on hanks. Not complicated at all."
              > > "used Bolger's lines for the hull shape and designed everything
              else himself"
              > > "The cabin is completely open at the aft end, making the cabin
              and cockpit one continuous space. The hard dodger could have plastic windows fitted to enclose everything in case of cold or wet. She had two good berths, a small galley with sink and stove, and that's about all I remember."
              > > "Only criticism I have of the build is minor: He used plain old
              sand to make the decks non-skid. And non-skid they are! But they would be hard one's bare feet and knees if you liked to sail that way. Otherwise, I'd say Merlin is about as close to perfect as you could get. I just found my notes and Merlin's builder is David Ware of Rockport , Texas . Really nice fellow and very patient to explain about his boat."
              > >
              > >
              href="http://cultofku.com/imagehost/images/57129890730403507571.jpg">http://cultofku.com/imagehost/images/57129890730403507571.jpg
              > > from
              > >
              href="http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?127297-Talk-me-out-of-Michalak-s-Frolic2&s=e878c0b59ca3730fcd9120c8562c0728&p=2894903#post2894903">http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?127297-Talk-me-out-of-Michalak-s-Frolic2&s=e878c0b59ca3730fcd9120c8562c0728&p=2894903#post2894903
              > >
              >

            • phil.bolger
              As you all know, Double-Chine hulls are aplenty in the Archive, from NYMPH and SWEET PEA over the DIABLOS, FMS, SAMUEL CLYDE to indeed CHEBACCO, ARAVA, the
              Message 6 of 10 , Mar 26, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                As you all know, Double-Chine hulls are aplenty in the Archive, from NYMPH and SWEET PEA over the DIABLOS, FMS, SAMUEL CLYDE to indeed CHEBACCO, ARAVA, the 40-foot Ketch etc.  SWEET PEA has indeed been subject to in-house ‘fooling-around-with’ - irresistible as some of you found – since her stern is so tempting despite the (moderate) challenge of getting simple and affordable power into her.  The ‘theme’ of the English Canoe Yawls is awfully tempting, all the way back into LFH-land with a longer-leaner ROZINANTE – one all-time favorite of Phil’s.  But so far to no full design. 

                However, in Phil’s Archive there are a few examples of folks getting together in a ‘syndicate’ to finance a design they’d not be prepared to pay for individually...

                Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
                 
                 
                Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 9:04 AM
                Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som
                 
                 

                I spent a lot of time drooling over the Plywood Canoe Yawl. PCB pointed out that it was too small for most human beings. (Like PCB’s exquisite Monhegan  and the Cape Dory Typhoon). He also said it would be a better boat if the full keel were cut off and replaced with a flat bottom, some sort of keel/centerboard, and ballast. If this were done, the hill would superficially resemble Sweet Pea. However, simply scaling a boat up (or down) can result in all sorts of issues to include appropriate freeboard, scantlings, framing, and efficient use of plywood (and many others). None of these are insurmountable, but they do complicate the process…

                JohnT 


                From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto: bolger@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Ross
                Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 6:50 AM
                To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som

                 

                Bob,

                Thanks for the reminder about "Plywood Canoe Yawl" - I'm going to re-read the SBJ cartoon article tonight and do some thinking. Yes, I have a copy of "Holmes of the Humber " as well as the Albert Strange book already mentioned. I've been trying to get hold of a copy of the earlier John Leather publication about Albert Strange, but second-hand copies seem to command $350 prices. Luckily, I do have a copy of the superb little John Leather book, "Sail and Oar", which has a chapter about A.S. and "Cherub II", as well as lots of other reading.

                John Boy,

                I'll look up the Texas 200 Sailing Group - thanks for the lead. I'm not usually a fan of simply scaling an existing design, but this one seems to be well worth some arm-chair time. I know that the "Sweet Pea" design has been published in BWAOM, Woodenboat Magazine, and Harold Payson's Instant Boatbuilding, but I would write to Susanne Altenburger if ever I decided to build anything. It is unlikely, but I find the hull proportions to be an almost perfect fit with my fantasies about sailing at the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century.

                Thank-you for the comments about "Little Egret". A close examination of all of my designs will reveal clear evidence of what I have learned from the writing and published designs of Phil Bolger. My education started with my father, then moved to William Atkin, Howard Chapelle, L. Francis Herreshoff and countless others as I struggled to learn.

                I continue to be educated in the field and entertained by the work of scores or even hundreds of people - but without any doubt, Phil Bolger has exercised my mind in a way which not only taught me an enormous amount of information, but his thoughts gave me a key to unlock much of what was hidden in the work of the other masters, and would otherwise have remained hidden to me. Thank-you, Phil!

                Ross Lillistone

                --- In mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com, John Boy <t1ro2003@...> wrote:

                >
                > Ross,
                > The gentleman who
                built this boat is from Texas and has sailed it in the Texas200 and the Florida120. Â If you're on facebook, join the Texas 200 Sailing Club group and inquire about it. Â I'm certain someone knows how to contact the builder and can share his information with you. Â https://www.facebook.com/groups/100346820013471/
                >
                > BTW I love your Egret design. Â I'm building a Michalak Normsboat right
                now but plan to build a full scale Egret in 3-5 years. Â I've been drooling over Chapelle's, Sucher's, and Parkers version of the Egret for a couple of decades.
                > John Boy
                > Â
                >
                >
                > I have a blog! Â
                http://toon2sailor.blogspot.com/
                >
                > “Seaward ho! Hang the treasure! It's the glory of the sea that has
                turned my head.”Â
                >
                > Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure
                Island
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                >
                From: Ross <bsam9350@...>
                > To:
                href="mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com">mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 5:35 AM
                > Subject: [bolger] Re:
                FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som
                >
                >
                >  
                > C.Ruzer,
                >
                > I'm
                interested in any more information. I have long been taken by the lines of "Sweet Pea", and to make things worse (or better??), I have just received my copy of the book, "Albert Strange on Yacht Designing, Construction, and Cruising". Just think about "Cherub II" and "Sheila".
                >
                > You can
                get me at "r dot lillistone (at) gmail dot com" or I can contact you if preferred.
                >
                > Phil Bolger was, and still is, my most important
                teacher, despite the wealth of information out there from which we can all benefit written by others.
                >
                > Ross Lillistone
                >
                > ---
                In mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@> wrote:
                > >
                > > "Merlin" a 23' 1.5x
                scale-up of "Sweet Pea"
                > >
                > > About Merlin: <SNIPPED
                COMMENTS>
                > > "looks great"
                > > "sails great"
                > > "class act of the fleet"
                > > "knock out"
                > > "going to
                windward like a train"
                > > "a big, ballasted centerboard and a big
                square fixed rudder on a skeg"
                > > "drew around 18-22" with the board
                up and that was at the rudder"
                > > "may have had some additional
                internal ballast"
                > > "rudder and skeg appeared to be ~1/4" flat
                aluminum plate"
                > > "~6hp Tohatsu in a well mounted forward of the
                rudder"
                > > "Rig is a wooden mast, owner-built, in a tabernacle. It's
                a simple rig, four stays with no spreaders"
                > > "big low-aspect main
                and what looks to be a ~115% masthead jib on hanks. Not complicated at all."
                > > "used Bolger's lines for the hull shape and designed everything
                else himself"
                > > "The cabin is completely open at the aft end, making
                the cabin and cockpit one continuous space. The hard dodger could have plastic windows fitted to enclose everything in case of cold or wet. She had two good berths, a small galley with sink and stove, and that's about all I remember."
                > > "Only criticism I have of the build is minor: He used plain old
                sand to make the decks non-skid. And non-skid they are! But they would be hard one's bare feet and knees if you liked to sail that way. Otherwise, I'd say Merlin is about as close to perfect as you could get. I just found my notes and Merlin's builder is David Ware of Rockport , Texas . Really nice fellow and very patient to explain about his boat."
                > >
                > >
                href="http://cultofku.com/imagehost/images/57129890730403507571.jpg">http://cultofku.com/imagehost/images/57129890730403507571.jpg
                > > from
                > >
                href="http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?127297-Talk-me-out-of-Michalak-s-Frolic2&s=e878c0b59ca3730fcd9120c8562c0728&p=2894903#post2894903">http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?127297-Talk-me-out-of-Michalak-s-Frolic2&s=e878c0b59ca3730fcd9120c8562c0728&p=2894903#post2894903
                > >
                >

              • c.ruzer
                Ross, sorry, I know no more about the Merlin than the info I linked to. Was surprised that the boat was not more widely known, certainly seems to warrant it
                Message 7 of 10 , Mar 27, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Ross, sorry, I know no more about the Merlin than the info I linked to. Was surprised that the boat was not more widely known, certainly seems to warrant it and attract positive interest - but that event was three years ago... What do you reckon, a lifting keel similar to the SHS?

                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <philbolger@...> wrote:
                  > However, in Phil’s Archive there are a few examples of folks
                  > getting together in a ‘syndicate’ to finance a design they’d
                  > not be prepared to pay for individually...

                  Colour me sorta interested. Anyone else?

                  Merlin, a 1.5x Sweet Pea, lifting keel & etc., something like that is a very interesting idea, maybe 2x could be as interesting, no? I am certainly attracted to the "Merlin-ish" idea. But...

                  Riffing now on a 1x Sweet Pea, or sub 1x, on that double-chined double-ended pea-pod-doryness-Humberness looks and competency,...

                  Has anyone else noticed that Dave Bolduc has just crossed to Bimini, Bahamas, in a small 12ft internally ballasted, part decked and dodgered(?), sharpie microcruiser, the original "Enigma", and will soon continue cruising on to the Bahamas outer banks after a bit of a rest (after 20 hour passage across plus lots of shipping etc). http://physics.bgsu.edu/~layden/FunStuff/Boats/Matt_Boat/matts_boat2005.htm http://www.microcruising.com/new1a.htm

                  The Enigma is essentially an open dinghy/skiff with attention to solutions facilitating a bit more serious or extended cruising use if wished than might be easily or sensibly undertaken in a more usual small boat camp/beach-cruiser. Well, I wonder that a ~16ft Sweet Pea type with a similar small boat cruising style in mind might be a very nice boat also for similar microcruising. A handy rig, maybe ballast lifting keel or better idea, reserve floatation, comfy shelter for crew, a bit more draft from increased rocker (?), I'd say, to carry some increased displacement, a sailboat but not bad rowboat, and so on, you get the idea... Sweet Pea seems like it may adapt well to this kind of intended use - sometime daysailer, beachcruiser and occaisional capable comfy extended microcruiser. I'd certainly like the sheltered crew accommodation, shelter from sun, from rain, from cold, from casual observers, etc., but that it also be pretty much a (deceptively) simple small open boat.

                  The photo of and description of the Merlin accommodations, "The cabin is completely open at the aft end, making the cabin and cockpit one continuous space. The hard dodger could have plastic windows fitted to enclose everything in case of cold or wet." using a hard superstructure (demountable? with additional high flotation and solar insulation?) might be as good or better a way to go than a canvas shelter. Ross would well know of the Queensland sun, and where the skin cancer, melanoma capital of the world is located... sizzle, sizzle, ice and slice and slice again.

                  Many, many people would love to obtain Matt Layden's plans for Enigma but they aren't likely to be forthcoming ---

                  How about a solution for a similar wish list of capabilities and fun adventures as an Enigma, but arrived at from a Sweet Pea hull type starting point? Humber Yawls and such are lovely, lovely boats, but they're more yacht-like than open boats, more complicated, expensive, and the skipper/crew sits in the sun all day and fries (even in winter - believe it!) and from that some dies or elsewhere it's cold and even snow which means some don't much go. I reckon this could be a dinghy-cruising dream and/or a challenge boat scheme.



                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <philbolger@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > As you all know, Double-Chine hulls are aplenty in the Archive, from NYMPH and SWEET PEA over the DIABLOS, FMS, SAMUEL CLYDE to indeed CHEBACCO, ARAVA, the 40-foot Ketch etc. SWEET PEA has indeed been subject to in-house ‘fooling-around-with’ - irresistible as some of you found â€" since her stern is so tempting despite the (moderate) challenge of getting simple and affordable power into her. The ‘theme’ of the English Canoe Yawls is awfully tempting, all the way back into LFH-land with a longer-leaner ROZINANTE â€" one all-time favorite of Phil’s. But so far to no full design.
                  >
                  > However, in Phil’s Archive there are a few examples of folks getting together in a ‘syndicate’ to finance a design they’d not be prepared to pay for individually...
                  >
                  > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
                  >
                  >
                  > From: John Trussell
                  > Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 9:04 AM
                  > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I spent a lot of time drooling over the Plywood Canoe Yawl. PCB pointed out that it was too small for most human beings. (Like PCB’s exquisite Monhegan and the Cape Dory Typhoon). He also said it would be a better boat if the full keel were cut off and replaced with a flat bottom, some sort of keel/centerboard, and ballast. If this were done, the hill would superficially resemble Sweet Pea. However, simply scaling a boat up (or down) can result in all sorts of issues to include appropriate freeboard, scantlings, framing, and efficient use of plywood (and many others). None of these are insurmountable, but they do complicate the process…
                  >
                  >
                  > JohnT
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  >
                  > From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ross
                  > Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 6:50 AM
                  > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Bob,
                  >
                  > Thanks for the reminder about "Plywood Canoe Yawl" - I'm going to re-read the SBJ cartoon article tonight and do some thinking. Yes, I have a copy of "Holmes of the Humber" as well as the Albert Strange book already mentioned. I've been trying to get hold of a copy of the earlier John Leather publication about Albert Strange, but second-hand copies seem to command $350 prices. Luckily, I do have a copy of the superb little John Leather book, "Sail and Oar", which has a chapter about A.S. and "Cherub II", as well as lots of other reading.
                  >
                  > John Boy,
                  >
                  > I'll look up the Texas 200 Sailing Group - thanks for the lead. I'm not usually a fan of simply scaling an existing design, but this one seems to be well worth some arm-chair time. I know that the "Sweet Pea" design has been published in BWAOM, Woodenboat Magazine, and Harold Payson's Instant Boatbuilding, but I would write to Susanne Altenburger if ever I decided to build anything. It is unlikely, but I find the hull proportions to be an almost perfect fit with my fantasies about sailing at the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century.
                  >
                  > Thank-you for the comments about "Little Egret". A close examination of all of my designs will reveal clear evidence of what I have learned from the writing and published designs of Phil Bolger. My education started with my father, then moved to William Atkin, Howard Chapelle, L. Francis Herreshoff and countless others as I struggled to learn.
                  >
                  > I continue to be educated in the field and entertained by the work of scores or even hundreds of people - but without any doubt, Phil Bolger has exercised my mind in a way which not only taught me an enormous amount of information, but his thoughts gave me a key to unlock much of what was hidden in the work of the other masters, and would otherwise have remained hidden to me. Thank-you, Phil!
                  >
                  > Ross Lillistone
                  >
                  > --- In mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com, John Boy <t1ro2003@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Ross,
                  > > The gentleman who built this boat is from Texas and has sailed it in the Texas200 and the Florida120. Â If you're on facebook, join the Texas 200 Sailing Club group and inquire about it. Â I'm certain someone knows how to contact the builder and can share his information with you. Â https://www.facebook.com/groups/100346820013471/
                  > >
                  > > BTW I love your Egret design. Â I'm building a Michalak Normsboat right now but plan to build a full scale Egret in 3-5 years. Â I've been drooling over Chapelle's, Sucher's, and Parkers version of the Egret for a couple of decades.
                  > > John Boy
                  > > Â
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > I have a blog! Â http://toon2sailor.blogspot.com/
                  > >
                  > > â€Å"Seaward ho! Hang the treasure! It's the glory of the sea that has turned my head.”Â
                  > >
                  > > Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ________________________________
                  > > From: Ross <bsam9350@>
                  > > To: mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com
                  > > Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 5:35 AM
                  > > Subject: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Â
                  > > C.Ruzer,
                  > >
                  > > I'm interested in any more information. I have long been taken by the lines of "Sweet Pea", and to make things worse (or better??), I have just received my copy of the book, "Albert Strange on Yacht Designing, Construction, and Cruising". Just think about "Cherub II" and "Sheila".
                  > >
                  > > You can get me at "r dot lillistone (at) gmail dot com" or I can contact you if preferred.
                  > >
                  > > Phil Bolger was, and still is, my most important teacher, despite the wealth of information out there from which we can all benefit written by others.
                  > >
                  > > Ross Lillistone
                  > >
                  > > --- In mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > "Merlin" a 23' 1.5x scale-up of "Sweet Pea"
                  > > >
                  > > > About Merlin: <SNIPPED COMMENTS>
                  > > > "looks great"
                  > > > "sails great"
                  > > > "class act of the fleet"
                  > > > "knock out"
                  > > > "going to windward like a train"
                  > > > "a big, ballasted centerboard and a big square fixed rudder on a skeg"
                  > > > "drew around 18-22" with the board up and that was at the rudder"
                  > > > "may have had some additional internal ballast"
                  > > > "rudder and skeg appeared to be ~1/4" flat aluminum plate"
                  > > > "~6hp Tohatsu in a well mounted forward of the rudder"
                  > > > "Rig is a wooden mast, owner-built, in a tabernacle. It's a simple rig, four stays with no spreaders"
                  > > > "big low-aspect main and what looks to be a ~115% masthead jib on hanks. Not complicated at all."
                  > > > "used Bolger's lines for the hull shape and designed everything else himself"
                  > > > "The cabin is completely open at the aft end, making the cabin and cockpit one continuous space. The hard dodger could have plastic windows fitted to enclose everything in case of cold or wet. She had two good berths, a small galley with sink and stove, and that's about all I remember."
                  > > > "Only criticism I have of the build is minor: He used plain old sand to make the decks non-skid. And non-skid they are! But they would be hard one's bare feet and knees if you liked to sail that way. Otherwise, I'd say Merlin is about as close to perfect as you could get. I just found my notes and Merlin's builder is David Ware of Rockport, Texas. Really nice fellow and very patient to explain about his boat."
                  > > >
                  > > > http://cultofku.com/imagehost/images/57129890730403507571.jpg
                  > > > from
                  > > > http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?127297-Talk-me-out-of-Michalak-s-Frolic2&s=e878c0b59ca3730fcd9120c8562c0728&p=2894903#post2894903
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Peter
                  ... Mr. Ware (I trust) has a better imagination that I. This is a very clever idea that has resulted in a very attractive boat. The 1.5x size brings you to the
                  Message 8 of 10 , Mar 27, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > "Merlin" a 23' 1.5x scale-up of "Sweet Pea"
                    >. I just found my notes and Merlin's builder is David Ware of Rockport, Texas.

                    Mr. Ware (I trust) has a better imagination that I. This is a very clever idea that has resulted in a very attractive boat. The 1.5x size brings you to the 3x8' length for planking that PCP used a lot and referred to as the 2-butt size.

                    Double-enders this size are not common. William Garden had a couple: Eel, and one designed for the windy parts of the Gulf Coast. I was thinking about what other designs PCB might have pointed you too, and I'm sure he would have mentioned Birdwatcher. And Long Micro, and the 20' sharpie, and Martha Jane. And if you reject all the flat-bottom designs, then one of the versions of the Chebacco.
                  • Ross
                    Despite being interested in Humber Yawls, and other such micro cruisers, in my heart I know that the best fun comes from boats in the 15 to 16 foot range with
                    Message 9 of 10 , Mar 28, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Despite being interested in Humber Yawls, and other such micro cruisers, in my heart I know that the best fun comes from boats in the 15 to 16 foot range with a beam of 4 1/2 to 5 feet. The envelope between a boat which is too small and one which is too big, is very narrow.

                      What you say about a single handed cruiser based on Sweet Pea has a tremendous appeal.

                      In the last 13 years I have built about 55 boats, but none have been for my own use. I'm getting close to building a boat for me, and I am torn between one of my own designs or one from Phil Bolger.

                      My current favourite is Jinni for a whole range of reasons which are too complicated to describe, but include research.

                      You are correct about the sun in Queensland, and at the moment I am finishing off the build of a Scram Pram started by one of my customers. This will give me the opportunity to test the Birdwatcher principle. However, after many years of thought I have come to the conclusion that a concentration on appropriate clothing is the real answer to sun protection.

                      The fact of the matter is that my favourite form of boating is dinghy sailing.

                      Ross Lillistone


                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Ross, sorry, I know no more about the Merlin than the info I linked to. Was surprised that the boat was not more widely known, certainly seems to warrant it and attract positive interest - but that event was three years ago... What do you reckon, a lifting keel similar to the SHS?
                      >
                      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <philbolger@> wrote:
                      > > However, in Phil’s Archive there are a few examples of folks
                      > > getting together in a ‘syndicate’ to finance a design they’d
                      > > not be prepared to pay for individually...
                      >
                      > Colour me sorta interested. Anyone else?
                      >
                      > Merlin, a 1.5x Sweet Pea, lifting keel & etc., something like that is a very interesting idea, maybe 2x could be as interesting, no? I am certainly attracted to the "Merlin-ish" idea. But...
                      >
                      > Riffing now on a 1x Sweet Pea, or sub 1x, on that double-chined double-ended pea-pod-doryness-Humberness looks and competency,...
                      >
                      > Has anyone else noticed that Dave Bolduc has just crossed to Bimini, Bahamas, in a small 12ft internally ballasted, part decked and dodgered(?), sharpie microcruiser, the original "Enigma", and will soon continue cruising on to the Bahamas outer banks after a bit of a rest (after 20 hour passage across plus lots of shipping etc). http://physics.bgsu.edu/~layden/FunStuff/Boats/Matt_Boat/matts_boat2005.htm http://www.microcruising.com/new1a.htm
                      >
                      > The Enigma is essentially an open dinghy/skiff with attention to solutions facilitating a bit more serious or extended cruising use if wished than might be easily or sensibly undertaken in a more usual small boat camp/beach-cruiser. Well, I wonder that a ~16ft Sweet Pea type with a similar small boat cruising style in mind might be a very nice boat also for similar microcruising. A handy rig, maybe ballast lifting keel or better idea, reserve floatation, comfy shelter for crew, a bit more draft from increased rocker (?), I'd say, to carry some increased displacement, a sailboat but not bad rowboat, and so on, you get the idea... Sweet Pea seems like it may adapt well to this kind of intended use - sometime daysailer, beachcruiser and occaisional capable comfy extended microcruiser. I'd certainly like the sheltered crew accommodation, shelter from sun, from rain, from cold, from casual observers, etc., but that it also be pretty much a (deceptively) simple small open boat.
                      >
                      > The photo of and description of the Merlin accommodations, "The cabin is completely open at the aft end, making the cabin and cockpit one continuous space. The hard dodger could have plastic windows fitted to enclose everything in case of cold or wet." using a hard superstructure (demountable? with additional high flotation and solar insulation?) might be as good or better a way to go than a canvas shelter. Ross would well know of the Queensland sun, and where the skin cancer, melanoma capital of the world is located... sizzle, sizzle, ice and slice and slice again.
                      >
                      > Many, many people would love to obtain Matt Layden's plans for Enigma but they aren't likely to be forthcoming ---
                      >
                      > How about a solution for a similar wish list of capabilities and fun adventures as an Enigma, but arrived at from a Sweet Pea hull type starting point? Humber Yawls and such are lovely, lovely boats, but they're more yacht-like than open boats, more complicated, expensive, and the skipper/crew sits in the sun all day and fries (even in winter - believe it!) and from that some dies or elsewhere it's cold and even snow which means some don't much go. I reckon this could be a dinghy-cruising dream and/or a challenge boat scheme.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, <philbolger@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > As you all know, Double-Chine hulls are aplenty in the Archive, from NYMPH and SWEET PEA over the DIABLOS, FMS, SAMUEL CLYDE to indeed CHEBACCO, ARAVA, the 40-foot Ketch etc. SWEET PEA has indeed been subject to in-house ‘fooling-around-with’ - irresistible as some of you found â€" since her stern is so tempting despite the (moderate) challenge of getting simple and affordable power into her. The ‘theme’ of the English Canoe Yawls is awfully tempting, all the way back into LFH-land with a longer-leaner ROZINANTE â€" one all-time favorite of Phil’s. But so far to no full design.
                      > >
                      > > However, in Phil’s Archive there are a few examples of folks getting together in a ‘syndicate’ to finance a design they’d not be prepared to pay for individually...
                      > >
                      > > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > From: John Trussell
                      > > Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 9:04 AM
                      > > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I spent a lot of time drooling over the Plywood Canoe Yawl. PCB pointed out that it was too small for most human beings. (Like PCB’s exquisite Monhegan and the Cape Dory Typhoon). He also said it would be a better boat if the full keel were cut off and replaced with a flat bottom, some sort of keel/centerboard, and ballast. If this were done, the hill would superficially resemble Sweet Pea. However, simply scaling a boat up (or down) can result in all sorts of issues to include appropriate freeboard, scantlings, framing, and efficient use of plywood (and many others). None of these are insurmountable, but they do complicate the process…
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > JohnT
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      > >
                      > > From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ross
                      > > Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 6:50 AM
                      > > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Bob,
                      > >
                      > > Thanks for the reminder about "Plywood Canoe Yawl" - I'm going to re-read the SBJ cartoon article tonight and do some thinking. Yes, I have a copy of "Holmes of the Humber" as well as the Albert Strange book already mentioned. I've been trying to get hold of a copy of the earlier John Leather publication about Albert Strange, but second-hand copies seem to command $350 prices. Luckily, I do have a copy of the superb little John Leather book, "Sail and Oar", which has a chapter about A.S. and "Cherub II", as well as lots of other reading.
                      > >
                      > > John Boy,
                      > >
                      > > I'll look up the Texas 200 Sailing Group - thanks for the lead. I'm not usually a fan of simply scaling an existing design, but this one seems to be well worth some arm-chair time. I know that the "Sweet Pea" design has been published in BWAOM, Woodenboat Magazine, and Harold Payson's Instant Boatbuilding, but I would write to Susanne Altenburger if ever I decided to build anything. It is unlikely, but I find the hull proportions to be an almost perfect fit with my fantasies about sailing at the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century.
                      > >
                      > > Thank-you for the comments about "Little Egret". A close examination of all of my designs will reveal clear evidence of what I have learned from the writing and published designs of Phil Bolger. My education started with my father, then moved to William Atkin, Howard Chapelle, L. Francis Herreshoff and countless others as I struggled to learn.
                      > >
                      > > I continue to be educated in the field and entertained by the work of scores or even hundreds of people - but without any doubt, Phil Bolger has exercised my mind in a way which not only taught me an enormous amount of information, but his thoughts gave me a key to unlock much of what was hidden in the work of the other masters, and would otherwise have remained hidden to me. Thank-you, Phil!
                      > >
                      > > Ross Lillistone
                      > >
                      > > --- In mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com, John Boy <t1ro2003@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Ross,
                      > > > The gentleman who built this boat is from Texas and has sailed it in the Texas200 and the Florida120. Â If you're on facebook, join the Texas 200 Sailing Club group and inquire about it. Â I'm certain someone knows how to contact the builder and can share his information with you. Â https://www.facebook.com/groups/100346820013471/
                      > > >
                      > > > BTW I love your Egret design. Â I'm building a Michalak Normsboat right now but plan to build a full scale Egret in 3-5 years. Â I've been drooling over Chapelle's, Sucher's, and Parkers version of the Egret for a couple of decades.
                      > > > John Boy
                      > > > Â
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > I have a blog! Â http://toon2sailor.blogspot.com/
                      > > >
                      > > > â€Å"Seaward ho! Hang the treasure! It's the glory of the sea that has turned my head.”Â
                      > > >
                      > > > Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > ________________________________
                      > > > From: Ross <bsam9350@>
                      > > > To: mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com
                      > > > Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 5:35 AM
                      > > > Subject: [bolger] Re: FL120 2010 Pic - On Bolger Sweet Pea lines. Ya don't say? Hmmm... now that's som
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Â
                      > > > C.Ruzer,
                      > > >
                      > > > I'm interested in any more information. I have long been taken by the lines of "Sweet Pea", and to make things worse (or better??), I have just received my copy of the book, "Albert Strange on Yacht Designing, Construction, and Cruising". Just think about "Cherub II" and "Sheila".
                      > > >
                      > > > You can get me at "r dot lillistone (at) gmail dot com" or I can contact you if preferred.
                      > > >
                      > > > Phil Bolger was, and still is, my most important teacher, despite the wealth of information out there from which we can all benefit written by others.
                      > > >
                      > > > Ross Lillistone
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > "Merlin" a 23' 1.5x scale-up of "Sweet Pea"
                      > > > >
                      > > > > About Merlin: <SNIPPED COMMENTS>
                      > > > > "looks great"
                      > > > > "sails great"
                      > > > > "class act of the fleet"
                      > > > > "knock out"
                      > > > > "going to windward like a train"
                      > > > > "a big, ballasted centerboard and a big square fixed rudder on a skeg"
                      > > > > "drew around 18-22" with the board up and that was at the rudder"
                      > > > > "may have had some additional internal ballast"
                      > > > > "rudder and skeg appeared to be ~1/4" flat aluminum plate"
                      > > > > "~6hp Tohatsu in a well mounted forward of the rudder"
                      > > > > "Rig is a wooden mast, owner-built, in a tabernacle. It's a simple rig, four stays with no spreaders"
                      > > > > "big low-aspect main and what looks to be a ~115% masthead jib on hanks. Not complicated at all."
                      > > > > "used Bolger's lines for the hull shape and designed everything else himself"
                      > > > > "The cabin is completely open at the aft end, making the cabin and cockpit one continuous space. The hard dodger could have plastic windows fitted to enclose everything in case of cold or wet. She had two good berths, a small galley with sink and stove, and that's about all I remember."
                      > > > > "Only criticism I have of the build is minor: He used plain old sand to make the decks non-skid. And non-skid they are! But they would be hard one's bare feet and knees if you liked to sail that way. Otherwise, I'd say Merlin is about as close to perfect as you could get. I just found my notes and Merlin's builder is David Ware of Rockport, Texas. Really nice fellow and very patient to explain about his boat."
                      > > > >
                      > > > > http://cultofku.com/imagehost/images/57129890730403507571.jpg
                      > > > > from
                      > > > > http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?127297-Talk-me-out-of-Michalak-s-Frolic2&s=e878c0b59ca3730fcd9120c8562c0728&p=2894903#post2894903
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • John Weiss
                      You may be able to get all in one... Take a look at Nord Koster, a 16 version of a Humber Yawl by Bolger. http://www.canoeyawl.org/?p=156
                      Message 10 of 10 , Mar 29, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        You may be able to get all in one... Take a look at Nord Koster, a 16'
                        version of a Humber Yawl by Bolger. http://www.canoeyawl.org/?p=156

                        On 3/28/2013 7:06 PM, Ross wrote:
                        > Despite being interested in Humber Yawls, and other such micro cruisers,
                        > in my heart I know that the best fun comes from boats in the 15 to 16
                        > foot range with a beam of 4 1/2 to 5 feet. The envelope between a boat
                        > which is too small and one which is too big, is very narrow.
                        >
                        > What you say about a single handed cruiser based on Sweet Pea has a
                        > tremendous appeal.
                        >
                        > In the last 13 years I have built about 55 boats, but none have been for
                        > my own use. I'm getting close to building a boat for me, and I am torn
                        > between one of my own designs or one from Phil Bolger.
                        >
                        > My current favourite is Jinni for a whole range of reasons which are too
                        > complicated to describe, but include research.
                        >
                        > You are correct about the sun in Queensland, and at the moment I am
                        > finishing off the build of a Scram Pram started by one of my customers.
                        > This will give me the opportunity to test the Birdwatcher principle.
                        > However, after many years of thought I have come to the conclusion that
                        > a concentration on appropriate clothing is the real answer to sun
                        > protection.
                        >
                        > The fact of the matter is that my favourite form of boating is dinghy
                        > sailing.
                        >
                        > Ross Lillistone
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