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Re: [bolger] Re: Sir Joseph Banks

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  • phil.bolger
    Good morning. All shoveled out ! #370 Solution-48 (48 x12 8 x2 6 ) a lugger-ketch steel centerboarder has been built in a number of copies, sometimes back
    Message 1 of 21 , Feb 10, 2013
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      Good morning.
      All shoveled out !

      #370 "Solution-48"  (48'x12'8"x2'6") a lugger-ketch steel centerboarder has been built in a number of copies, sometimes back in the market.  Shallow Vee-bottom throughout.  Inboard diesel.  Sharp ends for occasional overloads without dragging the transom.  See DIFFERENT BOATS ch. 25.

      Might be too small though for all that wish-list.  Something like that could be done as a longer Vee-Nose Sharpie for a sharp entry and otherwise simple thick-scantlings hull with whatever rig geometry...

      Susanne Altenburger, PB&F 
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, February 10, 2013 2:36 AM
      Subject: [bolger] Re: Sir Joseph Banks

       

      Thanks, Susanne. On the off chance that I don't win the lottery and I would have to tackle such a project with my own retirement funds, are there any other simple steel cruisers in the PB&F catalog that I might want to consider? I do like the simplicity of the sharpie hull in a live aboard that would spend for more time profiting from the shallow draft than uncomfortable because of the heel when cruising.

      While I would not want to have something built here--Kenya is not noted for its shipbuilding heritage--there are many places around the world where I might well consider having a commercial shipyard tackle the basic construction, power plant installation and finishing of a simple steel boat and I would do the detail fitting out, interior joinery, electrical, etc. myself.

      Any suggestions? Something in 40-50' range, not far off from AS-39 Loose Moose, seems about right.

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, wrote:
      >
      > #573 "Sir Joseph Banks" was pushed to plans-status and would indeed be available.
      > Where you are working now, you might get her done to a more favorable budget.
      > A good dream alright.
      >
      > The next MAIB will feature 125'x16'x3'6 motorsailer ketch 'Phouma', which might be available.
      > She is afloat in Eureka, as you already read in earlier postings here...
      >
      > Meanwhile our blizzard produced 22-inches in Boston of mostly fluffy snow. Never lost power. Dramatic looks. Storm-surge between 2 and 4 feet depending on where you are in these parts.
      > I'll try to shovel the snow down-wind...
      >
      > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
      >
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Matthew Long
      > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Saturday, February 09, 2013 8:22 AM
      > Subject: [bolger] Sir Joseph Banks
      >
      >
      >
      > I have often daydreamed about building Sir Joseph Banks, likely with a reduced hold and more living space, as a floating home, garage and workshop in which to travel the world.
      >
      > Was the Sir Joseph Banks project carried through to the point of complete drawings and construction notes? In other words, if I win the lottery and decide that what I really want is a enormous live aboard steel sharpie motorsailer, are the plans ready to go?
      >
      > The logical follow on question is--how much might it cost?
      >
      > Pure fantasy, of course, but you never know, somebody has to win the lottery!
      >
      > Cheers,
      >
      > Matthew
      >

    • Matthew Long
      Thanks, Susanne, and glad to hear that you are making through the Gloucester winter. Yes, that dory hull made up of straight sides is very appealing, though
      Message 2 of 21 , Feb 10, 2013
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        Thanks, Susanne, and glad to hear that you are making through the Gloucester winter.

        Yes, that dory hull made up of straight sides is very appealing, though you are right that while 48' feet is already a couple of times larger than anything else I have built, it wouldn't quite accommodate that wish list.

        If I may say so, S48 doesn't quite have the poetry of Sir Joseph Banks, which has purity of purpose that I admire.

        I guess I'll have to keep playing the lottery!

        All the best from Nairobi,

        Matthew

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, wrote:
        >
        > Good morning.
        > All shoveled out !
        >
        > #370 "Solution-48" (48'x12'8"x2'6") a lugger-ketch steel centerboarder has been built in a number of copies, sometimes back in the market. Shallow Vee-bottom throughout. Inboard diesel. Sharp ends for occasional overloads without dragging the transom. See DIFFERENT BOATS ch. 25.
        >
        > Might be too small though for all that wish-list. Something like that could be done as a longer Vee-Nose Sharpie for a sharp entry and otherwise simple thick-scantlings hull with whatever rig geometry...
        >
        > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Matthew Long
        > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Sunday, February 10, 2013 2:36 AM
        > Subject: [bolger] Re: Sir Joseph Banks
        >
        >
        >
        > Thanks, Susanne. On the off chance that I don't win the lottery and I would have to tackle such a project with my own retirement funds, are there any other simple steel cruisers in the PB&F catalog that I might want to consider? I do like the simplicity of the sharpie hull in a live aboard that would spend for more time profiting from the shallow draft than uncomfortable because of the heel when cruising.
        >
        > While I would not want to have something built here--Kenya is not noted for its shipbuilding heritage--there are many places around the world where I might well consider having a commercial shipyard tackle the basic construction, power plant installation and finishing of a simple steel boat and I would do the detail fitting out, interior joinery, electrical, etc. myself.
        >
        > Any suggestions? Something in 40-50' range, not far off from AS-39 Loose Moose, seems about right.
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, wrote:
        > >
        > > #573 "Sir Joseph Banks" was pushed to plans-status and would indeed be available.
        > > Where you are working now, you might get her done to a more favorable budget.
        > > A good dream alright.
        > >
        > > The next MAIB will feature 125'x16'x3'6 motorsailer ketch 'Phouma', which might be available.
        > > She is afloat in Eureka, as you already read in earlier postings here...
        > >
        > > Meanwhile our blizzard produced 22-inches in Boston of mostly fluffy snow. Never lost power. Dramatic looks. Storm-surge between 2 and 4 feet depending on where you are in these parts.
        > > I'll try to shovel the snow down-wind...
        > >
        > > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: Matthew Long
        > > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Saturday, February 09, 2013 8:22 AM
        > > Subject: [bolger] Sir Joseph Banks
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I have often daydreamed about building Sir Joseph Banks, likely with a reduced hold and more living space, as a floating home, garage and workshop in which to travel the world.
        > >
        > > Was the Sir Joseph Banks project carried through to the point of complete drawings and construction notes? In other words, if I win the lottery and decide that what I really want is a enormous live aboard steel sharpie motorsailer, are the plans ready to go?
        > >
        > > The logical follow on question is--how much might it cost?
        > >
        > > Pure fantasy, of course, but you never know, somebody has to win the lottery!
        > >
        > > Cheers,
        > >
        > > Matthew
        > >
        >
      • harryjak
        Doug Why all the worry about holding tanks? Most cruisers don t make it that big a deal. Composting toilets seem to work well with small crews. HJ Back late
        Message 3 of 21 , Feb 10, 2013
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          Doug

          Why all the worry about holding tanks? Most cruisers don't make it that big a deal.
          Composting toilets seem to work well with small crews.

          HJ

          Back late last winder I posted looking for a live aboard barge to cruise
          > the rivers and bays and to live aboard. I was thinking a wide sharpie
          > kind of hull. This boat seems to kind of fit that bill. I would want
          > some sail with leebords or some kind of lateral stability. Maybe a
          > little wider? I'd like a some sheer to the hull and cabin top as
          > well. A diesel engine, two dingies one to carry a good sized holding
          > tank to be pumped into when at anchor. A good sized coal or wood stove.
          > A large halding tank in case we can't pump into the holding dingy.. A
          > really big windlass forward and one aft to anchore close to shore in
          > narrow rivers. I think she would suit nicely Doug
          >
          >
          > On 02/10/2013 10:25 AM, sirdarnell wrote:
          >>
          >> If you've won the lottery make her out of copper-nickel (90/10).
          >> Slight increase in weight and strength, with same scantlings, but no
          >> corrosion or painting, ever.
          >>
          >> --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>,
          >> "Matthew Long" wrote:
          >> >
          >> > I have often daydreamed about building Sir Joseph Banks, likely with
          >> a reduced hold and more living space, as a floating home, garage and
          >> workshop in which to travel the world.
          >> >
          >> > Was the Sir Joseph Banks project carried through to the point of
          >> complete drawings and construction notes? In other words, if I win the
          >> lottery and decide that what I really want is a enormous live aboard
          >> steel sharpie motorsailer, are the plans ready to go?
          >> >
          >> > The logical follow on question is--how much might it cost?
          >> >
          >> > Pure fantasy, of course, but you never know, somebody has to win the
          >> lottery!
          >> >
          >> > Cheers,
          >> >
          >> > Matthew
          >> >
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          > --
          > Doug Pollard,
          > Sailor, Machinst, writer,artist
          > Visit me at:
          >
          > http://sailboatsfairandfine.blogspot.com/
          >
          >
          >
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