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Re: [bolger] finally getting off my butt, looking for recomendations

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  • Bill Howard
    Agreed. I like Jim Michalak s book and his plans. Have built a model of his Picara. After dumping my June Bug in the Chesapeake, I like the 500 pounds
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 19, 2012
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    Agreed.  I like Jim Michalak's book and his plans.  Have built a model of his Picara.  After dumping my "June Bug " in the Chesapeake, I like the 500 pounds ballast in Picara.

    Another correct and perhaps simpler answer is the Bolger "June Bug," and Dynamite's Payson's book, Build the New Instant Boats.

    Easily carries three when rowing.
    One person can car-top.
    Beachable.
    Has a pointy end.
    Fiberglass tape is needed only on chines.
    No fiberglass cloth needed.
    Nail and glue construction.
    No complicated bevel cuts on frames.
    DO NOT use luan.  As Dynamite said, "I would just as soon use shredded wheat."
    Do use marine ply.  About $90 per sheet, five sheets needed.
    Spruce is fine for chines and mast.
    Use oar plans from Jim Michalak's book, but modify to six-foot length.
    Fir for oars improves beauty.  Three coats varnish.  
    Order sail from Instant Boats.
    Do not stand up in this boat when afloat!

    Bill Howard
    Nellysford VA
  • philbolger@comcast.net
    Instead of going for a different design have you tried ballast in JUNE BUG then ? Susanne Altenburger, PB&F ... From: Bill Howard To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
    Message 2 of 9 , Dec 19, 2012
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      Instead of going for a different design have you tried ballast in JUNE BUG then ?

      Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, December 19, 2012 5:01 PM
      Subject: Re: [bolger] finally getting off my butt, looking for recomendations [5 Attachments]

      Agreed.  I like Jim Michalak's book and his plans.  Have built a model of his Picara.  After dumping my "June Bug " in the Chesapeake, I like the 500 pounds ballast in Picara.

      Another correct and perhaps simpler answer is the Bolger "June Bug," and Dynamite's Payson's book, Build the New Instant Boats.

      Easily carries three when rowing.
      One person can car-top.
      Beachable.
      Has a pointy end.
      Fiberglass tape is needed only on chines.
      No fiberglass cloth needed.
      Nail and glue construction.
      No complicated bevel cuts on frames.
      DO NOT use luan.  As Dynamite said, "I would just as soon use shredded wheat."
      Do use marine ply.  About $90 per sheet, five sheets needed.
      Spruce is fine for chines and mast.
      Use oar plans from Jim Michalak's book, but modify to six-foot length.
      Fir for oars improves beauty.  Three coats varnish.  
      Order sail from Instant Boats.
      Do not stand up in this boat when afloat!

      Bill Howard
      Nellysford VA











      On Dec 19, 2012, at 4:08 PM, Joseph Stromski wrote:

       

      The correct answer to this question is Jim Michalak's book "Boatbuilding for Beginners and Beyond". Included with the book are plans for his Mayfly 14 skiff (as well as a few other boats). There's also loads of other very useful info in that book, and at less than $20 is the deal of the century.
      I've never ever seen underlayment at Home Depot that was worth even looking twice at. Lowe's sells Ultraply XL that's a far better material than anything I've ever seen at HD. 
      Just my opinion, 
      Joe

      From: steven_dantonio <sdantonio93@...>
      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wed, December 19, 2012 1:16:25 PM
      Subject: [bolger] finally getting off my butt, looking for recomendations

       

      Hi All,

      After several years pf procrastination (I like to call it researching my options) it is time to build a boat.

      I am looking for comments, both pro and con on my three finalists in the selection (not in any special order:

      1. the Summer Breeze http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/07/projects/summerb/index.htm

      2. The Featherwind http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/01/articles/featherwind/index.htm

      3. Storm Petrel http://www.belljar.net/bolgersp.htm

      Of the three, the Summer breeze would probably be the quickest and easiest build for a first boat, and probably the easiest to car top (actually pickup truck top). As far as my skills I have over 20 years making making furniture and violins, but no boats. So, while I'm not an expert boat builder, I do know which end of the saw to hold onto.

      The first boat build will most likely be 0.25 inch luan ply (home depot grade) with fir chine's (yeah I know it will probably have to be rebuild in a couple years from better materials). Glassed and epoxy encapsulated. With this in mind the Summer Breeze followed in a couple years by a Storm Petrel seems like a good logical sequence (although I was thinking AS29, Jessie Cooper, or black skimmer for the second boat).

      The goal is a small-medium size lake, solo, daysailer with will probably never see salt water in it's first year of life.

      All three boats have a fairly wide beam, something I like for stability. So I shouldn't roll it to often. I also like a transom so I can tell the pointy end from the back (helps me know if I have it in forward or reverse). This is one reason I decided against the windsprint for a first boat (also the relatively small beam).

      So, suggestions and comments please. Both pro and con.

      Thank you,
      Steven




      Agreed.  I like Jim Michalak's book and his plans.  Have built a model of his Picara.  After dumping my "June Bug " in the Chesapeake, I like the 500 pounds ballast in Picara.

      Another correct and perhaps simpler answer is the Bolger "June Bug," and Dynamite's Payson's book, Build the New Instant Boats.

      Easily carries three when rowing.
      One person can car-top.
      Beachable.
      Has a pointy end.
      Fiberglass tape is needed only on chines.
      No fiberglass cloth needed.
      Nail and glue construction.
      No complicated bevel cuts on frames.
      DO NOT use luan.  As Dynamite said, "I would just as soon use shredded wheat."
      Do use marine ply.  About $90 per sheet, five sheets needed.
      Spruce is fine for chines and mast.
      Use oar plans from Jim Michalak's book, but modify to six-foot length.
      Fir for oars improves beauty.  Three coats varnish. 
      Order sail from Instant Boats.
      Do not stand up in this boat when afloat!

      Bill Howard
      Nellysford VA




      On Dec 19, 2012, at 4:08 PM, Joseph Stromski wrote:

      >
      > The correct answer to this question is Jim Michalak's book "Boatbuilding for Beginners and Beyond". Included with the book are plans for his Mayfly 14 skiff (as well as a few other boats). There's also loads of other very useful info in that book, and at less than $20 is the deal of the century.
      > I've never ever seen underlayment at Home Depot that was worth even looking twice at. Lowe's sells Ultraply XL that's a far better material than anything I've ever seen at HD.
      > Just my opinion,
      > Joe
      > From: steven_dantonio <sdantonio93@...>
      > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wed, December 19, 2012 1:16:25 PM
      > Subject: [bolger] finally getting off my butt, looking for recomendations
      >

      > Hi All,
      >
      > After several years pf procrastination (I like to call it researching my options) it is time to build a boat.
      >
      > I am looking for comments, both pro and con on my three finalists in the selection (not in any special order:
      >
      > 1. the Summer Breeze http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/07/projects/summerb/index.htm
      >
      > 2. The Featherwind http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/01/articles/featherwind/index.htm
      >
      > 3. Storm Petrel http://www.belljar.net/bolgersp.htm
      >
      > Of the three, the Summer breeze would probably be the quickest and easiest build for a first boat, and probably the easiest to car top (actually pickup truck top). As far as my skills I have over 20 years making making furniture and violins, but no boats. So, while I'm not an expert boat builder, I do know which end of the saw to hold onto.
      >
      > The first boat build will most likely be 0.25 inch luan ply (home depot grade) with fir chine's (yeah I know it will probably have to be rebuild in a couple years from better materials). Glassed and epoxy encapsulated. With this in mind the Summer Breeze followed in a couple years by a Storm Petrel seems like a good logical sequence (although I was thinking AS29, Jessie Cooper, or black skimmer for the second boat).
      >
      > The goal is a small-medium size lake, solo, daysailer with will probably never see salt water in it's first year of life.
      >
      > All three boats have a fairly wide beam, something I like for stability. So I shouldn't roll it to often. I also like a transom so I can tell the pointy end from the back (helps me know if I have it in forward or reverse). This is one reason I decided against the windsprint for a first boat (also the relatively small beam).
      >
      > So, suggestions and comments please. Both pro and con.
      >
      > Thank you,
      > Steven
      >
      >
      >

    • Bill Howard
      Hello Susanne: Have thought of that, but have not tried it yet. What would you suggest? Bill
      Message 3 of 9 , Dec 19, 2012
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        Hello Susanne:

        Have thought of that, but have not tried it yet.  

        What would you suggest? 

        Bill
        On Dec 19, 2012, at 7:08 PM, <philbolger@...> <philbolger@...> wrote:

         

        Instead of going for a different design have you tried ballast in JUNE BUG then ?

        Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Wednesday, December 19, 2012 5:01 PM
        Subject: Re: [bolger] finally getting off my butt, looking for recomendations [5 Attachments]

        Agreed.  I like Jim Michalak's book and his plans.  Have built a model of his Picara.  After dumping my "June Bug " in the Chesapeake, I like the 500 pounds ballast in Picara.

        Another correct and perhaps simpler answer is the Bolger "June Bug," and Dynamite's Payson's book, Build the New Instant Boats.

        Easily carries three when rowing.
        One person can car-top.
        Beachable.
        Has a pointy end.
        Fiberglass tape is needed only on chines.
        No fiberglass cloth needed.
        Nail and glue construction.
        No complicated bevel cuts on frames.
        DO NOT use luan.  As Dynamite said, "I would just as soon use shredded wheat."
        Do use marine ply.  About $90 per sheet, five sheets needed.
        Spruce is fine for chines and mast.
        Use oar plans from Jim Michalak's book, but modify to six-foot length.
        Fir for oars improves beauty.  Three coats varnish.  
        Order sail from Instant Boats.
        Do not stand up in this boat when afloat!

        Bill Howard
        Nellysford VA



































        On Dec 19, 2012, at 4:08 PM, Joseph Stromski wrote:

         

        The correct answer to this question is Jim Michalak's book "Boatbuilding for Beginners and Beyond". Included with the book are plans for his Mayfly 14 skiff (as well as a few other boats). There's also loads of other very useful info in that book, and at less than $20 is the deal of the century.
        I've never ever seen underlayment at Home Depot that was worth even looking twice at. Lowe's sells Ultraply XL that's a far better material than anything I've ever seen at HD. 
        Just my opinion, 
        Joe

        From: steven_dantonio <sdantonio93@...>
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, December 19, 2012 1:16:25 PM
        Subject: [bolger] finally getting off my butt, looking for recomendations

         

        Hi All,

        After several years pf procrastination (I like to call it researching my options) it is time to build a boat.

        I am looking for comments, both pro and con on my three finalists in the selection (not in any special order:

        1. the Summer Breeze http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/07/projects/summerb/index.htm

        2. The Featherwind http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/01/articles/featherwind/index.htm

        3. Storm Petrel http://www.belljar.net/bolgersp.htm

        Of the three, the Summer breeze would probably be the quickest and easiest build for a first boat, and probably the easiest to car top (actually pickup truck top). As far as my skills I have over 20 years making making furniture and violins, but no boats. So, while I'm not an expert boat builder, I do know which end of the saw to hold onto.

        The first boat build will most likely be 0.25 inch luan ply (home depot grade) with fir chine's (yeah I know it will probably have to be rebuild in a couple years from better materials). Glassed and epoxy encapsulated. With this in mind the Summer Breeze followed in a couple years by a Storm Petrel seems like a good logical sequence (although I was thinking AS29, Jessie Cooper, or black skimmer for the second boat).

        The goal is a small-medium size lake, solo, daysailer with will probably never see salt water in it's first year of life.

        All three boats have a fairly wide beam, something I like for stability. So I shouldn't roll it to often. I also like a transom so I can tell the pointy end from the back (helps me know if I have it in forward or reverse). This is one reason I decided against the windsprint for a first boat (also the relatively small beam).

        So, suggestions and comments please. Both pro and con.

        Thank you,
        Steven






        Agreed.  I like Jim Michalak's book and his plans.  Have built a model of his Picara.  After dumping my "June Bug " in the Chesapeake, I like the 500 pounds ballast in Picara.

        Another correct and perhaps simpler answer is the Bolger "June Bug," and Dynamite's Payson's book, Build the New Instant Boats.

        Easily carries three when rowing.
        One person can car-top.
        Beachable.
        Has a pointy end.
        Fiberglass tape is needed only on chines.
        No fiberglass cloth needed.
        Nail and glue construction.
        No complicated bevel cuts on frames.
        DO NOT use luan.  As Dynamite said, "I would just as soon use shredded wheat."
        Do use marine ply.  About $90 per sheet, five sheets needed.
        Spruce is fine for chines and mast.
        Use oar plans from Jim Michalak's book, but modify to six-foot length.
        Fir for oars improves beauty.  Three coats varnish. 
        Order sail from Instant Boats.
        Do not stand up in this boat when afloat!

        Bill Howard
        Nellysford VA




        On Dec 19, 2012, at 4:08 PM, Joseph Stromski wrote:

        >
        > The correct answer to this question is Jim Michalak's book "Boatbuilding for Beginners and Beyond". Included with the book are plans for his Mayfly 14 skiff (as well as a few other boats). There's also loads of other very useful info in that book, and at less than $20 is the deal of the century.
        > I've never ever seen underlayment at Home Depot that was worth even looking twice at. Lowe's sells Ultraply XL that's a far better material than anything I've ever seen at HD.
        > Just my opinion,
        > Joe
        > From: steven_dantonio <sdantonio93@...>
        > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wed, December 19, 2012 1:16:25 PM
        > Subject: [bolger] finally getting off my butt, looking for recomendations
        >

        > Hi All,
        >
        > After several years pf procrastination (I like to call it researching my options) it is time to build a boat.
        >
        > I am looking for comments, both pro and con on my three finalists in the selection (not in any special order:
        >
        > 1. the Summer Breeze http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/07/projects/summerb/index.htm
        >
        > 2. The Featherwind http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/01/articles/featherwind/index.htm
        >
        > 3. Storm Petrel http://www.belljar.net/bolgersp.htm
        >
        > Of the three, the Summer breeze would probably be the quickest and easiest build for a first boat, and probably the easiest to car top (actually pickup truck top). As far as my skills I have over 20 years making making furniture and violins, but no boats. So, while I'm not an expert boat builder, I do know which end of the saw to hold onto.
        >
        > The first boat build will most likely be 0.25 inch luan ply (home depot grade) with fir chine's (yeah I know it will probably have to be rebuild in a couple years from better materials). Glassed and epoxy encapsulated. With this in mind the Summer Breeze followed in a couple years by a Storm Petrel seems like a good logical sequence (although I was thinking AS29, Jessie Cooper, or black skimmer for the second boat).
        >
        > The goal is a small-medium size lake, solo, daysailer with will probably never see salt water in it's first year of life.
        >
        > All three boats have a fairly wide beam, something I like for stability. So I shouldn't roll it to often. I also like a transom so I can tell the pointy end from the back (helps me know if I have it in forward or reverse). This is one reason I decided against the windsprint for a first boat (also the relatively small beam).
        >
        > So, suggestions and comments please. Both pro and con.
        >
        > Thank you,
        > Steven
        >
        >
        >



      • MylesJ. Swift
        For the stability you want and cartoppable weight I d consider the 10 6 version of Brick. It doesn t have a point though. There are several designs that are
        Message 4 of 9 , Dec 20, 2012
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          For the stability you want and cartoppable weight I’d consider the 10’6 version of Brick. It doesn’t have a point though. There are several designs that are basically a Brick with a pointy end. I’ve had June Bug for years which is what I use for your described purpose but I got one of the $200 trailers for it. I’ve also got a Tortoise, a Brick/Duck, and a Micro.

           

          MylesJ

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