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Re:Douglas Pollard's 'Dream'

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  • Mark Albanese
    Would this be too small? Too spartan? Fit your budget? Fast enough building to get you out there soon?  ... Would this be too small? Too spartan? Fit your
    Message 1 of 28 , Sep 13, 2012
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    Would this be too small? Too spartan? Fit your budget? Fast enough building to get you out there soon?
  • Joe T
    Any mention of scows brings to mind the Periauger Scow in Pete Culler s Boats by John Burke. LOA 32ft, WL 27ft 8in, Beam 10ft, Draft 2ft, Sail, cat ketch,
    Message 2 of 28 , Sep 13, 2012
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      Any mention of scows brings to mind the Periauger Scow in "Pete Culler's Boats" by John Burke. LOA 32ft, WL 27ft 8in, Beam 10ft, Draft 2ft, Sail, cat ketch, 527sf. I lust for this design though I could never build it. Likely takes an experienced traditional boat-wright. V bottom with chines swept high at the bow. Culler designed this for himself, never built. His widow withheld the plans from sale when published in 1984. Could be available now? This it at the top of my list of beautiful boats, along with Gilmer's Blue Moon.

      > The Bolger Scow Schooner?
      >
    • Joe T
      Culler s Periauger Scow --- Plans at Mystic Seaport: http://mobius.mysticseaport.org/detail.php?t=objects&type=browse&f=maker&s=Robert+&record=1010 Lots of
      Message 3 of 28 , Sep 13, 2012
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      • Douglas Pollard
        Message 4 of 28 , Sep 14, 2012
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          On 09/14/2012 01:49 AM, Mark Albanese wrote:
          > Would this be too small? Too spartan? Fit your budget? Fast enough
          > building to get you out there soon?
          >
          >
          >
          > On Sep 12, 2012, at 1:02 PM, Douglas Pollard wrote:
          >
          >> I would like a little less than a blue water sharpie. Leeboards would
          >> be nice but centerboard would be OK. I like the sprite booms Mr. Bolger
          >> Favored. Still I am getting old so maybe a junk rig would be easy to
          >> Reef and easy for my wife if she has to come home alone. I like a ketch
          >> or schooner but a yawl will work. Free standing masts are essential to
          >> the rigs I like. Without stays, head sails are out. I want an inboard
          >> engine with plenty of fuel and water. I want a hand operated anchor
          >> windlass with enough bowsprit to hang Anchors on. I want standing
          >> headroom through most of the cabin Galley and head. At least 4
          >> bunks.Comfortable live aboard accommodations I don't think I can
          >> convince my wife to camp on a boat for the next ten years. I would be
          >> willing to consider stayed rigs in a ketch or schooner if the rest of
          >> the boat suited me.. Shallow draft for me would be less than 3ft. I
          >> would think a boat like I am describing would likely be in the 32 to
          >> 36ft range. A little on the wide side would be Ok as speed is no longer
          >> necessary to us. I would like a wood core with glass outside marine or
          >> equivalent plywood.. I want a cockpit long enough to stretch out in. I
          >> am 5' 6" so that is a fairly short one head room 6ft would be great. I
          >> would like masts that fold down. We will want pressurized hot and cold
          >> water. We will not be camping aboard we will be living aboard for a long
          >> time the the accommodations need to be in accordance with that life
          >> style. I would like to not spend over $50,000 so she would not be a
          >> newer boat. I can get most of what I want in a production glass boat
          >> that has pretty much been redone recently, with fairly new or rebuilt
          >> engine and in very nice condition. The trouble is it is not what I want.
          >> Such a boat will primarily be used in inland waterways and rivers
          >> with occasional trips to the Bahamas. We may pick our days and skip down
          >> island a ways. Doug
          >>
          >> On 09/12/2012 11:47 AM, philbolger@...
          >> <mailto:philbolger%40comcast.net> wrote:
          >> > Can you boil down your net requirements for your live-aboard ?
          >> > Perhaps there are option in the archive or based on what we have.
          >> > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
          >> >
          >> > ----- Original Message -----
          >> > From: "Douglas Pollard" <dougpol1@...
          >> <mailto:dougpol1%40verizon.net>>
          >> > To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>>
          >> > Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 11:14 AM
          >> > Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: a little food for thought
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >>
          >> >>
          >> >> Yes thats true and varnish does do that. Still the surfaces I am
          >> >> talking about are inside the boat so they are pretty well protected.
          >> >> No one should think I am disapproving of wood and glass. It is my
          >> >> material of choice. I also think wood has taken a bad rap and would be
          >> >> better trusted by boat boat users in general if you could go aboard and
          >> >> see if the boats is healthy or not. If a person doesn't know, he has to
          >> >> do a contract on the boat in order to get her surveyed. To bother
          >> at all
          >> >> he needs a little evidence that she is worth doing all that. I have
          >> >> looked at a lot of boats, glass wood and metals most I reject out of
          >> >> hand for one reason or another. All are boats that would possibly do
          >> >> what I want to do. I never even go to the point of getting a survey
          >> >> because of things I saw. But so if there was something about the boat
          >> >> that encouraged me I might have gone farther with a deal. I have a boat
          >> >> and will likely use it for a years or so but I will buy a boat to live
          >> >> on and cruse. Anything that makes her easier to buy, will surely
          >> >> encourage me. A few pictures of a naturally finished interior will
          >> >> likely send me packing a thousand miles to go look at her if she suites
          >> >> my purpose. If she is painted inside then all I have to go on is
          >> >> whether she looks well cared for or not. Doug
          >> >>
          >> >>
          >> >> On 09/12/2012 10:32 AM, sirdarnell wrote:
          >> >>> Epoxy that will be exposed to sunlight needs to be painted. Sunlight
          >> >>> causes it to break down.
          >> >>>
          >> >>> --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>
          >> <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>, Douglas
          >> >>> Pollard <dougpol1@...> wrote:
          >> >>> >
          >> >>> > I am wanting to buy a boat to live on. I would like to have a
          >> >>> > sharpie big enough to live on. She would likely be glass over
          >> wood as
          >> >>> > most now are. One problem is you can't tell whats going on with the
          >> >>> wood
          >> >>> > in the construction if it's epoxied inside and then painted. So in a
          >> >>> way
          >> >>> > you could be buying a pig in a poke. IF I were going to build an
          >> AS 29
          >> >>> > or 39 I would epoxy her on the inside but I would not paint her. I
          >> >>> might
          >> >>> > paint non structural parts but not bulkheads at least where they
          >> join
          >> >>> > the hull and I would not paint the hull along the areas where it is
          >> >>> > attached to frames and I would not paint the over head. Any
          >> buyer and
          >> >>> > myself as well could see any darkening wood that might be a problem.
          >> >>> > This likely would tell me there is a little problem here or
          >> there but
          >> >>> a
          >> >>> > piece or two of lumber a little work and I will have a new boat.
          >> >>> > I looked at a really nice 36ft boat a few years ago. The fellow
          >> >>> > wanted $30,000 and I offered $20,000 she was beautiful inside all
          >> >>> > painted white but she was 40 years old but I think in excellent
          >> >>> > condition. But how could I know. I could go around and tap her
          >> with a
          >> >>> > mallet in all the places where she was not likely to be rotting like
          >> >>> in
          >> >>> > the panels. But right next to stringers and frames not so easy. I
          >> >>> belive
          >> >>> > the owner did his best to maintain her except that he couldn't
          >> be sure
          >> >>> > either.
          >> >>> > If I could looked all inside her and determined that everything
          >> >>> > was OK I might have argued him down on general principles and bought
          >> >>> > her. She would have been well worth the money.
          >> >>> > So if I built such a boat I would attempt to take all the guess
          >> >>> > work out for the potential buyer and for myself when using her over
          >> >>> the
          >> >>> > years. I think many boats are sold by the builders because they are
          >> >>> > not sure things are not weakening in them. They could easily
          >> know do a
          >> >>> > few repares and continue sailing her for 30 or 40 years. It's even
          >> >>> > possible the boat might get more valuable as it gets older.
          >> Certainly
          >> >>> > surviers would be less reluctant to give a thumbs up on a wooden
          >> boat.
          >> >>> > Doug
          >> >>> >
          >> >>>
          >> >>>
          >> >>
          >> >>
          >> >>
          >> >> ------------------------------------
          >> >>
          >> >> Bolger rules!!!
          >> >> - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
          >> >> - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead
          >> >> horses
          >> >> - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
          >> >> - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
          >> >> - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
          >> 01930, Fax:
          >> >> (978) 282-1349
          >> >> - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >> <mailto:bolger-unsubscribe%40yahoogroups.com>
          >> >> - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >> <mailto:bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe%40yahoogroups.com> Yahoo!
          >> >> Groups Links
          >> >>
          >> >>
          >> >>
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> > ------------------------------------
          >> >
          >> > Bolger rules!!!
          >> > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
          >> > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging
          >> dead horses
          >> > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
          >> > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
          >> > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930,
          >> Fax: (978) 282-1349
          >> > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >> <mailto:bolger-unsubscribe%40yahoogroups.com>
          >> > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >> <mailto:bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe%40yahoogroups.com> Yahoo!
          >> Groups Links
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >>
          >
        • Douglas Pollard
          Joe she is a good looking boat actually kind of a yachtey looking boat. My wife is and I have been up since earlier in the morning talking about boats. She
          Message 5 of 28 , Sep 14, 2012
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            Joe she is a good looking boat actually kind of a yachtey looking boat.
            My wife is and I have been up since earlier in the morning talking
            about boats. She says, "Doug, you are not thinking. After those boys
            build a boat. You will have all the real work left to do. Things like
            spars rigging plumbing engine installation, steering and trimming out
            the furniture so she looks at least respectable. We will need a
            windlass, winches and on and on." I have to admit she is right. I am at
            this moment thinking I will drive up and look at "Hogfish". I have no
            idea what the asking price is or whether or not she is suitable to live
            aboard or not. They are k living on her now with children so she may
            well be just fine. I remember seeing her in the Bahamas and I remember
            her as being a nice boat. The good news is I can sail and live aboard
            my little boat a year or two and in that time just the right boat will
            likely turn up. I might change my mind next week?? Doug

            On 09/14/2012 02:46 AM, Joe T wrote:
            > Culler's Periauger Scow --- Plans at Mystic Seaport:
            > http://mobius.mysticseaport.org/detail.php?t=objects&type=browse&f=maker&s=Robert+&record=1010
            >
            > Lots of hits on Google:
            > https://www.google.com/search?q=Culler+Periaguer+Scow&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
            >
            >
          • Eric
            Doug, you and your wife might want to check out this link. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/junkrig/message/19452 The boat is larger than you have
            Message 6 of 28 , Sep 19, 2012
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              Doug, you and your wife might want to check out this link. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/junkrig/message/19452 The boat is larger than you have envisioned, but it is a steel replica of China Cloud, a boat the ninety+ year old designer sails single handedly (If I remember his age correctly). It goes on sale this Fall. Perhaps worth your while to check out. You'll have to decide whether the original designer or the owner of this replica are more in line with your abilities to handle a vessel. Best wishes. And thanks for continuing to share your wisdom about boats and boat maintenance.

              Eric

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@...> wrote:
              >
              > Joe she is a good looking boat actually kind of a yachtey looking boat.
              > My wife is and I have been up since earlier in the morning talking
              > about boats. She says, "Doug, you are not thinking. After those boys
              > build a boat. You will have all the real work left to do. Things like
              > spars rigging plumbing engine installation, steering and trimming out
              > the furniture so she looks at least respectable. We will need a
              > windlass, winches and on and on." I have to admit she is right. I am at
              > this moment thinking I will drive up and look at "Hogfish". I have no
              > idea what the asking price is or whether or not she is suitable to live
              > aboard or not. They are k living on her now with children so she may
              > well be just fine. I remember seeing her in the Bahamas and I remember
              > her as being a nice boat. The good news is I can sail and live aboard
              > my little boat a year or two and in that time just the right boat will
              > likely turn up. I might change my mind next week?? Doug
              >
              > On 09/14/2012 02:46 AM, Joe T wrote:
              > > Culler's Periauger Scow --- Plans at Mystic Seaport:
              > > http://mobius.mysticseaport.org/detail.php?t=objects&type=browse&f=maker&s=Robert+&record=1010
              > >
              > > Lots of hits on Google:
              > > https://www.google.com/search?q=Culler+Periaguer+Scow&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
              > >
              > >
              >
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