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RE: [bolger] Inboard idea...

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  • Wayne Gilham
    In the very-long-ago days of direct-drive marine engines of pleasureboat size -- like the old one-lungers that typically turned 500 to max 800 rpm -- and
    Message 1 of 12 , May 9, 2012
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    In the very-long-ago days of direct-drive marine engines of pleasureboat size -- like the old
    "one-lungers" that typically turned 500 to max 800 rpm -- and were often "direct-reversing",
    especially if a two-stroke -- the engine itself had a thrust bearing on the forward end of the
    crankshaft (transmitting thrust from crankshaft to engine-block) ... I've taken a few of these old
    engines apart, and it's often a roller thrust bearing even way back in the early 1900's -- or at
    least some mighty large-diameter thrust-washers.







    From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of farna@...
    Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 6:50 AM
    To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: [bolger] Inboard idea...





    I'm eventually going to build an inboard with the motor up near the front. Haven't settled on a hull
    yet, but have been thinking on the motor. It will be an automotive conversion. I've seen a couple
    with Honda car engines, and want something small similar to that, but I may have access to a 120 hp
    Mercruiser (Cold Chevy 140 cubic inch four). Don't want the in/out arrangement, straight shaft
    inboard.

    I've seen two older conversions that used an automotive transmission. One used twin sixes with
    automatic transmissions. In that one one trans was run in reverse all the time, the other always in
    first, so props were turned opposite each other. Gear reductions were close in those gears -- the
    props were custom made to make up the difference. Owner said that cruising at about 25 knots the
    throttles were perfectly aligned, slightly out at lower speeds to balance. The other used a manual
    three speed trans with a single engine. The engine was just behind the driver's seat and had a hand
    clutch arrangement with two cables. The cable were connected one to the first/reverse and one to the
    2nd/3rd shift levers. They were adjusted so that they would only shift neutral/revers and
    neutral/3rd (a manual stop to prevent 1st and 2nd operation might have been in place... he may have
    used 2nd instead of 3rd, as 3rd is 1:1).

    What I don't know is how the thrust arrangement was made. I believe the manual trans used a single
    universal joint at the trans, not sure about the autos, though they had to have some type of slip
    coupling. Shouldn't there be something on the shaft itself to handle thrust of the prop, or is it
    just right up the shaft into the transmission? Cars don't have anything, but the thrust is taken
    through the suspension, not the drive shaft/transmission/engine. I suppose I could use a pillow
    block bearing near the trans that has a thrust bearing in it...
  • Wayne Gilham
    Glen-L may have resources how to adapt an automobile engine -- seems that make-do approach is right up their alley. Check their website Regards, Wayne Gilham
    Message 2 of 12 , May 9, 2012
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    Glen-L may have resources how to adapt an automobile engine -- seems that "make-do" approach is
    right up their alley. Check their website



    Regards,

    Wayne Gilham
  • Christopher C. Wetherill
    Barr Marine was the big player in my youth. They still exist. It appears they are concentrated on V-8, however. V/R Chris
    Message 3 of 12 , May 9, 2012
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      Barr Marine was the big player in my youth.  They still exist.  It appears they are concentrated on V-8, however.

      V/R
      Chris

      On 5/9/2012 4:27 PM, Wayne Gilham wrote:
      <*>[Attachment(s) from Wayne Gilham included below]
      
      Glen-L may have resources how to adapt an automobile engine -- seems that "make-do" approach is
      right up their alley. Check their website
      
       
      
      Regards,
      
      Wayne Gilham
      
      
      
      <*>Attachment(s) from Wayne Gilham:
      
      
      <*> 1 of 1 File(s) http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/attachments/folder/283075546/item/list 
        <*> winmail.dat
      
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    • Wayne Gilham
      There used to be an old long-skinny round-bilge boat on-the-beach here in Pacific NW (Longbranch, WA as I remember) with a heavy old striaght-six waaaaaay
      Message 4 of 12 , May 9, 2012
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      There used to be an old long-skinny round-bilge boat on-the-beach here in Pacific NW (Longbranch, WA
      as I remember) with a heavy old striaght-six waaaaaay forward under the foredeck, perhaps to get a
      shallower shaft-exit angle... never saw it running, but I bet it really threw an arc of spray off
      that rather immersed bow....







      Wayne Gilham



      From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wayne Gilham
      Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 1:27 PM
      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [bolger] Inboard idea... [1 Attachment]





      [Attachment(s) from Wayne Gilham included below]

      Glen-L may have resources how to adapt an automobile engine -- seems that "make-do" approach is
      right up their alley. Check their website

      Regards,

      Wayne Gilham
    • Mike Allison
      ... Glen-L has a plan for a homemade FNR setup that uses a pillowblock to support the shaft. It may give you an idea to start from. Mike Allison... (North of
      Message 5 of 12 , May 9, 2012
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        On 05/09/2012 03:27 PM, Wayne Gilham wrote:
         

        Glen-L may have resources how to adapt an automobile engine -- seems that "make-do" approach is
        right up their alley. Check their website

        Regards,

        Wayne Gilham

        Glen-L has a plan for a homemade FNR setup that uses a pillowblock to support the shaft.
        It may give you an idea to start from.


        Mike Allison... (North of Kansas City Mo. USA)

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