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RE: [bolger] Re: Whalewatcher modifications

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  • Connor, Patrick
    Sorry all, hit send too soon. Anyways, the change would open up the cockpit to a huge degree. There s a lot going on back there (thwart, mast step, motor,
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 10, 2012
      Sorry all, hit "send" too soon. Anyways, the change would open up the cockpit to a huge degree. There's a lot going on back
      there (thwart, mast step, motor, long tiller, a lot of lines (7), anchor & rode - at least on mine) in a small space. It all seems to manage
      but I won't deny that it's a fire drill at times, even with a good crew. I don't think Phil considered this too important as the rest of the
      boat certainly fosters the concept of the crew spreading out inside. But the extra usable space would be nice at certain times, say at
      mealtimes on pleasant evenings, and help with spce to neaten up.
       
      Can't speak to sail balance, etc. Might have to make the mizzen a little smaller, etc., but worth considering for new build.
       
      I think by far the cheapest solution for the rudder is to make the rudder about 2 1/2 -3 inches deeper. It's well slanted on its leading
      edge and this will allow it to ride up on obstructions- and it still would only draw 13"-13 1/2".

      From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Rob Kellock
      Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2012 4:22 AM
      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [bolger] Re: Whalewatcher modifications

       

      Hi Patrick & Suzanne,

      Thank you for your detailed responses. Much appreciated. The rudder size issue is a tricky problem. Personally, I wouldn't want twin rudders because they would get in the way of accessing the boat over the stern transom and the linkage between the two would have to contend with the outboard motor.

      Anything wrong with the older style high aspect Martha Jane single hinged rudder except that you need to take a bunch of cheap pencils with you on every trip to break when you hit the bottom?

      Cheers,

      Rob.

    • sirdarnell
      Does the Whalewatcher rudder have an end plate? If not, adding one should give it a better grip on the water.
      Message 2 of 18 , Apr 10, 2012
        Does the Whalewatcher rudder have an end plate? If not, adding one should give it a better grip on the water.

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...> wrote:
        >
        > In-house we've discussed and drew across a range of cartoons and preliminary designs twin rudders, side-by-side, far enough apart to be to be just inside the transom-corners when fore& aft. Linkage yes, but not horrendous. Easier than your car's front-end...
        > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Connor, Patrick
        > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Monday, April 09, 2012 9:59 AM
        > Subject: Re: [bolger] Whalewatcher modifications
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Agree we have adapted ourselves to Utilis, but that was easy; early on I thought the lee boards could be wider at the bottom and the rudder larger. I still maintain the same as to the rudder; it is underpowered and should be deeper. Pulling a number out of the air, I would say at least 25% deeper. However, after experimenting with experienced crew on several extended cruises, I have come to think the leeboards are fine. However in the correspondence between Phil and George, it was clear Phil felt the final shape a compromise simply to allow the windows to open fully with the board partly down. He drew an early cartoon that showed boards similar in shape to Black Skimmer's.
        >
        > In actual use we usually keep the boards part way down (and the windows open) in sheltered anchorages. In marinas and open anchorages we raise the boards all the way up- in the former to serve as fender boards and in the latter to eliminate banging. You can still crack the windows about 3". Keep in mind our forward windows open so there is still plenty of through ventilation.
        >
        > Relative to ballast tanks ours is very simple and employs no fancy devices. It is completely reliable. Our WW is set up with very simple screw-in type cockpit drain plugs at the deepest point of each tank (on the side, not the bottom and accessed from outside) and a vent on the top of each tank accessed from inside under the 'mid ships counter (bronze opening valve). Procedure is: prior to launch, open vents and remove the plugs. Launch boat. Tanks fill (and empty) in about ten minutes. They will fill completely. Close vents and screw in plugs. You need to wade in of course to replace the plugs unless you have a dinghy. You're all set. When taking out, we usually open the vents, then pull the boat out and then remove the plugs on the ramp. I trailer her behind an F-150 so there is plenty of reserve power to pull the extra weight a few feet. I would not recommend trailering her any distance with tanks full to save needless stress on the hull.
        >
        > When I get home I always mop out any remaining water (about a quart)with a sponge by removing a 6" opening cleaning/inspection port installed on the top of each tank. In storage, I leave the screw-in lids off for ventilation. The interior of her tanks are coated with many, many coats of epoxy.
        >
        > This arrangement doesn't allow water that gets into the boat to escape; it must be mopped up. However, we never have had water inside the boat, except once when we left the boat to run errands with the companionway wide open and a heavy thunderstorm struck. With the cover Mason designed, it stays snug and dry. Ours doesn't live outside when not sailing but if she did I would spend the money for a good cover.
        >
        > If you pursue this with a view of allowing water to drain from the inside I might add that as designed the three athwartships structural members do not have limber holes which would be needed as a means to drain water to the deepest part of the hull. Of you do this you may need to increase their vertical dimension somewhat.
        >
        > --------------------------
        > Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > From: bolger@yahoogroups.com <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
        > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Mon Apr 09 04:15:09 2012
        > Subject: [bolger] Whalewatcher modifications
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi Patrick,
        >
        > A number of modifications to Whalewatcher were mooted back in http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/64115 quite soon after your first big trip report. Two things in particular were raised:
        >
        > 1. The leeboards were too narrow.
        > 2. The rudder was too small.
        >
        > Were any of those earlier mooted modifications undertaken or can I infer from your comments below, that in the end, the only changes that you felt really needed to be done were those you've listed below. In other words, you've adjusted to Utilis rather than the other way around!
        >
        > Also interested in how the water ballast filling and emptying procedure works. To fill do you:
        >
        > 1. Open a plug inside the boat in the centre of the ballast tank's upper surface. If this is the way its done then any rain that gets into the boat's cabin would automatically drain out through the ballast tank when the boat is being stored outside. That would be a big plus for me, knowing that I would never need to worry about rainwater building up inside the cabin when the boat is not being used.
        > 2. Open plug/s port and/or starboard and wait for the ballast tank to fill. Do the unballasted parts of the boat fore and aft of the ballast tank support the boat when the ballast tank is open, in which case, I'd guess, you would have to add the last few gallons yourself manually with a bucket?
        >
        > To empty do you:
        >
        > 1. Allow the tank to purge itself as you pull the boat out of the water on it's trailer or...
        >
        > 2. Use a bilge pump to drain the tank while still afloat?
        >
        > A final question, have you ever tried sailing to windward in the really shallow water that it's alleged the bowboard will let you sail in, say 18 inches? My local sailing haunt is Lake Ellesmere, just outside Christchurch, New Zealand (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Ellesmere_/_Te_Waihora). The lake is very shallow, mostly 4 foot deep, but also quite large at 9 miles wide and 18 miles long. I can sail far and wide in my Michalak Philsboat (I've NEVER seen another sailboat because I think it's too shallow for anything but specialised shoal draft sailing craft), but at 15'4" she's too slow to go anywhere fast.
        >
        > Cheers,
        >
        > Rob.
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Connor, Patrick" <pconnor@> wrote:
        > >
        > > To your questions, the stringers on mine are old growth, vertical grain
        > > fir. Tim Anderson, who built the hull in SoCal, had a big pile of it and
        > > used it for all of the solid wood structural elements. The bits that
        > > Mason added are Mahogany or Oak. Plywood for the hull was 1/2" fir,
        > > older stuff and pretty good as far as fir goes, but by the time I got
        > > the hull, was checked inside, even though it had been coated with epoxy
        > > (no 'glass inside). Mason recoated the interior (I believe), sanded,
        > > painted and so far no additional checking. Outside, Tim did a very good
        > > job coating with epoxy and F/G and there was no checking whatsover-and
        > > none thus far. Tight and strong. The bottom is three layers of 1/2" Ply
        > > (instead of two by the plans) and three layers of 10-oz F/G cloth- it
        > > isn't going anywhere.
        > >
        > > Tim departed on the plans by using a foam-cored upper deck with 1-by fir
        > > stringers, clad in 1/4" okume both inside and outside, for additional
        > > flotation high in emergency situations. Phil alluded to this change in
        > > his analysis of the design. Tim also added a full width thwart in
        > > cockpit about at the mizzen mast step in order to add additional
        > > stiffness in the aft part of the hull, which it most certainly does.
        > > Phil's thwart for the mast step is not drawn to full width. I think this
        > > too is a good change. Tim is an experienced professional boatbuilder who
        > > had built several Bolger boats over the years and had his own notions of
        > > strength. I know he consulted periodically with Phil, but do not know on
        > > what specifics.
        > >
        > > When Phil was on the boat, he asked if the plans had called for the
        > > solid bulkheads in the two that make up the fore and aft faces of the
        > > galley, as opposed to having cutouts like Jochems, so a person sitting
        > > in the aft part of the cabin could see forward. I told him the plans
        > > called for solid. His response: "That was an oversight." So there ya go.
        > > I think the cutouts would be a desirable change. Mason and I also
        > > decided that the windows facing forward into the bow well should open
        > > outwards, to allow for ventilation, and Mason installed them so. This
        > > too was a good change. Mason also directed the fabrication of a very
        > > clever canvas cover for the center opening that works like a charm and
        > > does not leak a drop, even in the heaviest downpour. This has been
        > > tested many times.
        > >
        > > Put a flexible rubber flap on the underside of the hull to cover the bow
        > > well drain hole so waves won't geyser into the bow well. Make sure to
        > > make that bow center board (you will need it to go to windward), and
        > > while you are at it, a filler, otherwise the bow well and everything in
        > > it WILL be wet.
        > >
        > > That's it. This is a great design and a great boat. There needs to be
        > > more of them! Phil commented when he sailed in her he was glad it got
        > > built- it was an important design.
        > >
        > > Patrick A. Connor
        >
      • Connor, Patrick
        It has end plates Patrick A. Connor Executive Vice President & Manager, National Services Group Old Republic National Title Insurance Company 141 East Town
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 10, 2012
          It has end plates
           
           
          Patrick A. Connor
          Executive Vice President & Manager,
          National Services Group
          Old Republic National Title Insurance Company
          141 East Town Street, Suite 101
          Columbus, Ohio 43215-5412
          Phone: 614-341-1900 Ext 13502
          Mobile: 614-208-9308
          Facsimile: 614-341-1903
           


          From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sirdarnell
          Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2012 1:28 PM
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [bolger] Re: Whalewatcher modifications

           

          Does the Whalewatcher rudder have an end plate? If not, adding one should give it a better grip on the water.

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...> wrote:

          >
          > In-house we've discussed and drew
          across a range of cartoons and preliminary designs twin rudders, side-by-side, far enough apart to be to be just inside the transom-corners when fore& aft. Linkage yes, but not horrendous. Easier than your car's front-end...
          >
          Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Connor, Patrick
          > To:
          href="mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com">bolger@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent:
          Monday, April 09, 2012 9:59 AM
          > Subject: Re: [bolger] Whalewatcher
          modifications
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Agree we have adapted
          ourselves to Utilis, but that was easy; early on I thought the lee boards could be wider at the bottom and the rudder larger. I still maintain the same as to the rudder; it is underpowered and should be deeper. Pulling a number out of the air, I would say at least 25% deeper. However, after experimenting with experienced crew on several extended cruises, I have come to think the leeboards are fine. However in the correspondence between Phil and George, it was clear Phil felt the final shape a compromise simply to allow the windows to open fully with the board partly down. He drew an early cartoon that showed boards similar in shape to Black Skimmer's.
          >
          > In actual use we usually keep the
          boards part way down (and the windows open) in sheltered anchorages. In marinas and open anchorages we raise the boards all the way up- in the former to serve as fender boards and in the latter to eliminate banging. You can still crack the windows about 3". Keep in mind our forward windows open so there is still plenty of through ventilation.
          >
          > Relative to ballast tanks ours is very
          simple and employs no fancy devices. It is completely reliable. Our WW is set up with very simple screw-in type cockpit drain plugs at the deepest point of each tank (on the side, not the bottom and accessed from outside) and a vent on the top of each tank accessed from inside under the 'mid ships counter (bronze opening valve). Procedure is: prior to launch, open vents and remove the plugs. Launch boat. Tanks fill (and empty) in about ten minutes. They will fill completely. Close vents and screw in plugs. You need to wade in of course to replace the plugs unless you have a dinghy. You're all set. When taking out, we usually open the vents, then pull the boat out and then remove the plugs on the ramp. I trailer her behind an F-150 so there is plenty of reserve power to pull the extra weight a few feet. I would not recommend trailering her any distance with tanks full to save needless stress on the hull.
          >
          > When I
          get home I always mop out any remaining water (about a quart)with a sponge by removing a 6" opening cleaning/inspection port installed on the top of each tank. In storage, I leave the screw-in lids off for ventilation. The interior of her tanks are coated with many, many coats of epoxy.
          >
          > This
          arrangement doesn't allow water that gets into the boat to escape; it must be mopped up. However, we never have had water inside the boat, except once when we left the boat to run errands with the companionway wide open and a heavy thunderstorm struck. With the cover Mason designed, it stays snug and dry. Ours doesn't live outside when not sailing but if she did I would spend the money for a good cover.
          >
          > If you pursue this with a view of allowing water
          to drain from the inside I might add that as designed the three athwartships structural members do not have limber holes which would be needed as a means to drain water to the deepest part of the hull. Of you do this you may need to increase their vertical dimension somewhat.
          >
          >
          --------------------------
          > Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          ----------------------------------------------------------
          > From:
          href="mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com">bolger@yahoogroups.com <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
          >
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
          >
          Sent: Mon Apr 09 04:15:09 2012
          > Subject: [bolger] Whalewatcher
          modifications
          >
          >
          >
          > Hi Patrick,
          >
          > A
          number of modifications to Whalewatcher were mooted back in http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/64115 quite soon after your first big trip report. Two things in particular were raised:
          >
          > 1. The leeboards were too narrow.
          > 2. The rudder
          was too small.
          >
          > Were any of those earlier mooted modifications
          undertaken or can I infer from your comments below, that in the end, the only changes that you felt really needed to be done were those you've listed below. In other words, you've adjusted to Utilis rather than the other way around!
          >
          > Also interested in how the water ballast filling and
          emptying procedure works. To fill do you:
          >
          > 1. Open a plug inside
          the boat in the centre of the ballast tank's upper surface. If this is the way its done then any rain that gets into the boat's cabin would automatically drain out through the ballast tank when the boat is being stored outside. That would be a big plus for me, knowing that I would never need to worry about rainwater building up inside the cabin when the boat is not being used.
          > 2. Open
          plug/s port and/or starboard and wait for the ballast tank to fill. Do the unballasted parts of the boat fore and aft of the ballast tank support the boat when the ballast tank is open, in which case, I'd guess, you would have to add the last few gallons yourself manually with a bucket?
          >
          > To empty
          do you:
          >
          > 1. Allow the tank to purge itself as you pull the boat
          out of the water on it's trailer or...
          >
          > 2. Use a bilge pump to
          drain the tank while still afloat?
          >
          > A final question, have you
          ever tried sailing to windward in the really shallow water that it's alleged the bowboard will let you sail in, say 18 inches? My local sailing haunt is Lake Ellesmere, just outside Christchurch, New Zealand (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Ellesmere_/_Te_Waihora). The lake is very shallow, mostly 4 foot deep, but also quite large at 9 miles wide and 18 miles long. I can sail far and wide in my Michalak Philsboat (I've NEVER seen another sailboat because I think it's too shallow for anything but specialised shoal draft sailing craft), but at 15'4" she's too slow to go anywhere fast.
          >
          > Cheers,
          >
          > Rob.
          >
          >
          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Connor, Patrick" <pconnor@> wrote:
          > >
          > > To your
          questions, the stringers on mine are old growth, vertical grain
          > >
          fir. Tim Anderson, who built the hull in SoCal, had a big pile of it and
          > > used it for all of the solid wood structural elements. The bits
          that
          > > Mason added are Mahogany or Oak. Plywood for the hull was 1/2"
          fir,
          > > older stuff and pretty good as far as fir goes, but by the
          time I got
          > > the hull, was checked inside, even though it had been
          coated with epoxy
          > > (no 'glass inside). Mason recoated the interior
          (I believe), sanded,
          > > painted and so far no additional checking.
          Outside, Tim did a very good
          > > job coating with epoxy and F/G and
          there was no checking whatsover-and
          > > none thus far. Tight and
          strong. The bottom is three layers of 1/2" Ply
          > > (instead of two by
          the plans) and three layers of 10-oz F/G cloth- it
          > > isn't going
          anywhere.
          > >
          > > Tim departed on the plans by using a
          foam-cored upper deck with 1-by fir
          > > stringers, clad in 1/4" okume
          both inside and outside, for additional
          > > flotation high in emergency
          situations. Phil alluded to this change in
          > > his analysis of the
          design. Tim also added a full width thwart in
          > > cockpit about at the
          mizzen mast step in order to add additional
          > > stiffness in the aft
          part of the hull, which it most certainly does.
          > > Phil's thwart for
          the mast step is not drawn to full width. I think this
          > > too is a
          good change. Tim is an experienced professional boatbuilder who
          > > had
          built several Bolger boats over the years and had his own notions of
          > > strength. I know he consulted periodically with Phil, but do not know
          on
          > > what specifics.
          > >
          > > When Phil was on the
          boat, he asked if the plans had called for the
          > > solid bulkheads in
          the two that make up the fore and aft faces of the
          > > galley, as
          opposed to having cutouts like Jochems, so a person sitting
          > > in the
          aft part of the cabin could see forward. I told him the plans
          > >
          called for solid. His response: "That was an oversight." So there ya go.
          > > I think the cutouts would be a desirable change. Mason and I also
          > > decided that the windows facing forward into the bow well should
          open
          > > outwards, to allow for ventilation, and Mason installed them
          so. This
          > > too was a good change. Mason also directed the fabrication
          of a very
          > > clever canvas cover for the center opening that works
          like a charm and
          > > does not leak a drop, even in the heaviest
          downpour. This has been
          > > tested many times.
          > >
          > > Put a flexible rubber flap on the underside of the hull to cover the
          bow
          > > well drain hole so waves won't geyser into the bow well. Make
          sure to
          > > make that bow center board (you will need it to go to
          windward), and
          > > while you are at it, a filler, otherwise the bow
          well and everything in
          > > it WILL be wet.
          > >
          > >
          That's it. This is a great design and a great boat. There needs to be
          > > more of them! Phil commented when he sailed in her he was glad it
          got
          > > built- it was an important design.
          > >
          > >
          Patrick A. Connor
          >

        • Susanne@comcast.net
          There certainly is, and while I did not see the prototype out of the water, we sailed her in Annapolis under the strong assumption that Mason Smith had done
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 10, 2012
            There certainly is, and while I did not see the prototype out of the water, we sailed her in Annapolis under the strong assumption that Mason Smith had done her right; she looked so good and 'original' in every way we could see and touch.
            Susanne
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2012 1:28 PM
            Subject: [bolger] Re: Whalewatcher modifications

             

            Does the Whalewatcher rudder have an end plate? If not, adding one should give it a better grip on the water.

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...> wrote:
            >
            > In-house we've discussed and drew across a range of cartoons and preliminary designs twin rudders, side-by-side, far enough apart to be to be just inside the transom-corners when fore& aft. Linkage yes, but not horrendous. Easier than your car's front-end...
            > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Connor, Patrick
            > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Monday, April 09, 2012 9:59 AM
            > Subject: Re: [bolger] Whalewatcher modifications
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Agree we have adapted ourselves to Utilis, but that was easy; early on I thought the lee boards could be wider at the bottom and the rudder larger. I still maintain the same as to the rudder; it is underpowered and should be deeper. Pulling a number out of the air, I would say at least 25% deeper. However, after experimenting with experienced crew on several extended cruises, I have come to think the leeboards are fine. However in the correspondence between Phil and George, it was clear Phil felt the final shape a compromise simply to allow the windows to open fully with the board partly down. He drew an early cartoon that showed boards similar in shape to Black Skimmer's.
            >
            > In actual use we usually keep the boards part way down (and the windows open) in sheltered anchorages. In marinas and open anchorages we raise the boards all the way up- in the former to serve as fender boards and in the latter to eliminate banging. You can still crack the windows about 3". Keep in mind our forward windows open so there is still plenty of through ventilation.
            >
            > Relative to ballast tanks ours is very simple and employs no fancy devices. It is completely reliable. Our WW is set up with very simple screw-in type cockpit drain plugs at the deepest point of each tank (on the side, not the bottom and accessed from outside) and a vent on the top of each tank accessed from inside under the 'mid ships counter (bronze opening valve). Procedure is: prior to launch, open vents and remove the plugs. Launch boat. Tanks fill (and empty) in about ten minutes. They will fill completely. Close vents and screw in plugs. You need to wade in of course to replace the plugs unless you have a dinghy. You're all set. When taking out, we usually open the vents, then pull the boat out and then remove the plugs on the ramp. I trailer her behind an F-150 so there is plenty of reserve power to pull the extra weight a few feet. I would not recommend trailering her any distance with tanks full to save needless stress on the hull.
            >
            > When I get home I always mop out any remaining water (about a quart)with a sponge by removing a 6" opening cleaning/inspection port installed on the top of each tank. In storage, I leave the screw-in lids off for ventilation. The interior of her tanks are coated with many, many coats of epoxy.
            >
            > This arrangement doesn't allow water that gets into the boat to escape; it must be mopped up. However, we never have had water inside the boat, except once when we left the boat to run errands with the companionway wide open and a heavy thunderstorm struck. With the cover Mason designed, it stays snug and dry. Ours doesn't live outside when not sailing but if she did I would spend the money for a good cover.
            >
            > If you pursue this with a view of allowing water to drain from the inside I might add that as designed the three athwartships structural members do not have limber holes which would be needed as a means to drain water to the deepest part of the hull. Of you do this you may need to increase their vertical dimension somewhat.
            >
            > --------------------------
            > Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Handheld
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ----------------------------------------------------------
            > From: bolger@yahoogroups.com <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
            > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Mon Apr 09 04:15:09 2012
            > Subject: [bolger] Whalewatcher modifications
            >
            >
            >
            > Hi Patrick,
            >
            > A number of modifications to Whalewatcher were mooted back in http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/64115 quite soon after your first big trip report. Two things in particular were raised:
            >
            > 1. The leeboards were too narrow.
            > 2. The rudder was too small.
            >
            > Were any of those earlier mooted modifications undertaken or can I infer from your comments below, that in the end, the only changes that you felt really needed to be done were those you've listed below. In other words, you've adjusted to Utilis rather than the other way around!
            >
            > Also interested in how the water ballast filling and emptying procedure works. To fill do you:
            >
            > 1. Open a plug inside the boat in the centre of the ballast tank's upper surface. If this is the way its done then any rain that gets into the boat's cabin would automatically drain out through the ballast tank when the boat is being stored outside. That would be a big plus for me, knowing that I would never need to worry about rainwater building up inside the cabin when the boat is not being used.
            > 2. Open plug/s port and/or starboard and wait for the ballast tank to fill. Do the unballasted parts of the boat fore and aft of the ballast tank support the boat when the ballast tank is open, in which case, I'd guess, you would have to add the last few gallons yourself manually with a bucket?
            >
            > To empty do you:
            >
            > 1. Allow the tank to purge itself as you pull the boat out of the water on it's trailer or...
            >
            > 2. Use a bilge pump to drain the tank while still afloat?
            >
            > A final question, have you ever tried sailing to windward in the really shallow water that it's alleged the bowboard will let you sail in, say 18 inches? My local sailing haunt is Lake Ellesmere, just outside Christchurch, New Zealand (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Ellesmere_/_Te_Waihora). The lake is very shallow, mostly 4 foot deep, but also quite large at 9 miles wide and 18 miles long. I can sail far and wide in my Michalak Philsboat (I've NEVER seen another sailboat because I think it's too shallow for anything but specialised shoal draft sailing craft), but at 15'4" she's too slow to go anywhere fast.
            >
            > Cheers,
            >
            > Rob.
            >
            > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Connor, Patrick" <pconnor@> wrote:
            > >
            > > To your questions, the stringers on mine are old growth, vertical grain
            > > fir. Tim Anderson, who built the hull in SoCal, had a big pile of it and
            > > used it for all of the solid wood structural elements. The bits that
            > > Mason added are Mahogany or Oak. Plywood for the hull was 1/2" fir,
            > > older stuff and pretty good as far as fir goes, but by the time I got
            > > the hull, was checked inside, even though it had been coated with epoxy
            > > (no 'glass inside). Mason recoated the interior (I believe), sanded,
            > > painted and so far no additional checking. Outside, Tim did a very good
            > > job coating with epoxy and F/G and there was no checking whatsover-and
            > > none thus far. Tight and strong. The bottom is three layers of 1/2" Ply
            > > (instead of two by the plans) and three layers of 10-oz F/G cloth- it
            > > isn't going anywhere.
            > >
            > > Tim departed on the plans by using a foam-cored upper deck with 1-by fir
            > > stringers, clad in 1/4" okume both inside and outside, for additional
            > > flotation high in emergency situations. Phil alluded to this change in
            > > his analysis of the design. Tim also added a full width thwart in
            > > cockpit about at the mizzen mast step in order to add additional
            > > stiffness in the aft part of the hull, which it most certainly does.
            > > Phil's thwart for the mast step is not drawn to full width. I think this
            > > too is a good change. Tim is an experienced professional boatbuilder who
            > > had built several Bolger boats over the years and had his own notions of
            > > strength. I know he consulted periodically with Phil, but do not know on
            > > what specifics.
            > >
            > > When Phil was on the boat, he asked if the plans had called for the
            > > solid bulkheads in the two that make up the fore and aft faces of the
            > > galley, as opposed to having cutouts like Jochems, so a person sitting
            > > in the aft part of the cabin could see forward. I told him the plans
            > > called for solid. His response: "That was an oversight." So there ya go.
            > > I think the cutouts would be a desirable change. Mason and I also
            > > decided that the windows facing forward into the bow well should open
            > > outwards, to allow for ventilation, and Mason installed them so. This
            > > too was a good change. Mason also directed the fabrication of a very
            > > clever canvas cover for the center opening that works like a charm and
            > > does not leak a drop, even in the heaviest downpour. This has been
            > > tested many times.
            > >
            > > Put a flexible rubber flap on the underside of the hull to cover the bow
            > > well drain hole so waves won't geyser into the bow well. Make sure to
            > > make that bow center board (you will need it to go to windward), and
            > > while you are at it, a filler, otherwise the bow well and everything in
            > > it WILL be wet.
            > >
            > > That's it. This is a great design and a great boat. There needs to be
            > > more of them! Phil commented when he sailed in her he was glad it got
            > > built- it was an important design.
            > >
            > > Patrick A. Connor
            >

          • daschultz8275@sbcglobal.net
            If you pursue this with a view of allowing water to drain from the inside I might add that as designed the three athwartships structural members do not have
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 12, 2012
              "If you pursue this with a view of allowing water to drain from the inside I might add that as designed the three athwartships structural members do not have limber holes which would be needed as a means to drain water to the deepest part of the hull. Of you do this you may need to increase their vertical dimension somewhat. "

              IMO depending on such a system will lead to rot when an unexpected corner stays wet, or the trailer is left at the wrong angle. Also, sooner or later the boat will be launched with the plug out and at least partially fill before the problem is caught.

              Lastly even if the plug is never forgotten, it becomes a point of mechanical failure, again flooding the boat.

              Don
            • Connor, Patrick
              agree. for the time, effort and $$ involved invest in a sound fitted full cover if you cannot arrange inside storage- not a blue tarp.
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 12, 2012
                agree. for the time, effort and $$ involved invest in a sound fitted full cover if you cannot arrange inside storage- not a blue tarp.
                 

                From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of daschultz8275@...
                Sent: Thursday, April 12, 2012 12:46 PM
                To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [bolger] Re: Whalewatcher modifications

                 

                "If you pursue this with a view of allowing water to drain from the inside I might add that as designed the three athwartships structural members do not have limber holes which would be needed as a means to drain water to the deepest part of the hull. Of you do this you may need to increase their vertical dimension somewhat. "

                IMO depending on such a system will lead to rot when an unexpected corner stays wet, or the trailer is left at the wrong angle. Also, sooner or later the boat will be launched with the plug out and at least partially fill before the problem is caught.

                Lastly even if the plug is never forgotten, it becomes a point of mechanical failure, again flooding the boat.

                Don

              • daschultz8275@sbcglobal.net
                ... Yes. As expensive as the custom cover is, it will be cheaper than building/renting/buying a structure...aye?
                Message 7 of 18 , Apr 13, 2012
                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Connor, Patrick" <pconnor@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > agree. for the time, effort and $$ involved invest in a sound fitted
                  > full cover if you cannot arrange inside storage- not a blue tarp.
                  >


                  Yes. As expensive as the custom cover is, it will be cheaper than building/renting/buying a structure...aye?
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