Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Building a Bolger Oldshoe

Expand Messages
  • David
    I reckon the bare hull of my Oldshoe weighs around 220 kgs (including 90 kgs of ballast all in under the center in the keel). The hull has 1/4 sides and all
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 9, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      I reckon the bare hull of my Oldshoe weighs around 220 kgs (including 90 kgs of ballast all in under the center in the keel). The hull has 1/4" sides and all other plywood is 3/8". Trailer weight is a lot more with masts, booms, oars, motor, etc.

      As far as I am concerned the only problem with the mainmast is the length not the weight. Stepping is easy as the foot goes into a step with the mast being held vertical by a simple fid.

      I understand you are talking of a tabernacle rather than a partner. I think you will find it will leave you a very unwieldy mast sticking out a long way behind the 12'boat. If you are worried by the weight of the mast I would go with a different rig rather than a adding a tabernacle. You could use a balanced lug, a spritsail or even a gunter since you will be heavily modifying the design in any case.

      The keel is only 1.5"wide so I agree with Susanne that I can't see batteries fitting in that space. You would have to place the batteries in the watertight compartments under the seats which in turn would mean leaving access to these Spaces, which does not sound great to me.

      Oldshoe has a lot of rocker in a short wide hull. You need to center the weight or the balance will not work. As designed Oldshoe is a great and safe boat to sail and play about in. She is not fast as she is only a 12' boat. I use a 3.5 HP Tohatsu 2 stroke off the transom as designed with little trouble except checking the clearance of the rudder by the prop when reversing by rotating the engine (I have no reverse gear on the motor)


      David

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > > However, I need to confirm the wooden hull weight and adjust for
      > > the aluminum hull.
      >
      > For this specified type (instant) of plywood constructed boat a reasonable rule of thumb for all up bare (ie. empty, unballasted, unrigged, motor-less, no tankage, not overbuilt - but inclusive of usual timber framing scantlings, fasteners, fibreglass [bottom sheathing], glue, filler, paint, & etc) hull weight is to allow 25lbs for each 1/4" plywood sheet, 37lbs for 3/8", and 50lbs for 1/2" respectively. This will not be exact as the various included materials, and construction alternatives differ somewhat, but is close enough for practical purposes. Jim Michalak laid out this rule someplace long ago, and I have seen it repeatedly closely match builders' reports and designers', such as PCB's, specified design figures for displacement and empty weight.
      >
      > It may be that for your choice of material, and including counstruction options chosen, that it is more important to consequently figure where that hull WEIGHT IS CENTRED, especially for sailing. That is choose scantlings, and position of added inclusions to arrrive at a total empty hull weight that is not only the same or less (less weight is good if possible), but is centred similarly in all planes, or lower in the verticle plane if possible. If the bare hull ends up heavier, ballast will most likely need be increased too - not good at all. If bare hull weight is close to design weight, but centred higher there may be a little room for things to work out by increasing ballast, depending, but this is a small boat and the consequences should be considered carefully. Keep any added weight low (in both senses), and don't over do it.
      >
    • Ned
      Owned one; never built one. Thoughts: Stable as a church; great confidence builder for a young un. Cat-yawl rig MIGHT not be the best beginner s rig, YMMV. As
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 9, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Owned one; never built one. Thoughts:

        Stable as a church; great confidence builder for a young 'un.
        Cat-yawl rig MIGHT not be the best beginner's rig, YMMV.
        As designed, lo-slung transom cut-out (for motor) makes a good boarding ladder, especially if rudder end-plates are reinforced. Would not recommend raising it.


        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "customsportsman" <olddaddy@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've not posted on this forum in recent memory, perhaps once or twice a long time ago. I am about to start building a Bolger Oldshoe and wanted to chat with anyone else who has one. My boat will be used primarily to teach my daughter to sail, and for us to fish out of when not sailing.
        >
        > As I am a lifelong metal worker I am building my hull out of aluminum. realize that may be heresy to some, but it's what I have available to build with. I'd like to find out what a wooden hull weights since I may have to adjust the ballast in my metal hull. I plan to build the hull pretty close to the plans, but with modifications to meet my own needs.
        >
        > My plan is to use a trolling motor for power instead of a gas outboard. I can mount the batteries down in the keel per plans and get ballast and power from them. I will also mount the foot of the tolling motor in the rudder allowing the transom to be raised up a bit across the width of the hull. Main mast will be in a partner allowing it to fold down and not have to be stepped. Mizzen will be on center line and will be stepped and removable. The forward bow transom will have an enclosed anchor locker allowing the wet line and anchor to live outside the cockpit. I'm adding flotation as an added safety factor.
        >
        > I am looking for sails if anyone has a set for sale.
        >
      • David
        I could not agree more
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 9, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          I could not agree more

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Ned" <nasplundh@...> wrote:
          > As designed, lo-slung transom cut-out (for motor) makes a good boarding ladder, especially if rudder end-plates are reinforced. Would not recommend raising it.
        • Joe T
          Look in the Photos section for mine and others. Joe T
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 10, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Look in the Photos section for mine and others.

            Joe T
          • Joe T
            More large photos in Bolger 6 files: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger6/files/Joe%20Tribulato%27s%20Oldshoe/ Joe T
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 10, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              More large photos in Bolger 6 files:

              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger6/files/Joe%20Tribulato%27s%20Oldshoe/

              Joe T

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Joe T" <scsbmsjoe@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Look in the Photos section for mine and others.
              >
              > Joe T
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.