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Re: On Bolger Fieldmouse/Supermouse Trap

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  • KK7B
    Very interesting discussion. The plumb bow does seem to be the right choice when overall length is constrained. Here is a counter example of what you get
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 20, 2012
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      Very interesting discussion. The plumb bow does seem to be the right choice when overall length is constrained. Here is a counter example of what you get when waterline length is constrained (17') but overall length (25') is free:

      http://knockaboutsloops.blogspot.com/2007/09/b-b-crowninshield-dark-harbor-17-12.html

      Beautiful--but that raises another design constraint: the customer's idea of how a fast, safe, weatherly or seaworthy boat should look. If one's idea of a boat was formed over years of daydreaming while gazing at prints of B B Crowninshield yachts on the library wall, the fieldmouse will appear strange. But now that several generations have had scores of functional and well-considered Bolger boats and books to sail and study perhaps our tastes are more highly evolved and open-minded.

      As to which is more seaworthy, that is a matter for pleasant conversation and speculation. But bear in mind that the lifeboat you step into as the Crowninshield yacht swamps and sinks is shaped very much like the fieldmouse.

      Rick


      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@...> wrote:
      >
      > http://rosslillistonewoodenboat.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/discussion-about-transom-bows-whimbrel.html
      >
    • mike graf
      Well said. Then considering that monthly financial outlay is directly proportional to OAL and the beauty of overhangs evade the common man. Used to cruise a
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 21, 2012
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        Well said. Then considering that monthly financial outlay is directly
        proportional to OAL and the beauty of overhangs evade the common man.
        Used to cruise a Seabird Yawl(considered ugly in it's day) and tow a
        glouster gull, people would "row out" to say how they liked to look at
        it! Never got that response when I went to maximum waterline/interior
        volume designs. BOATS,BOATS,BOATS

        Those Dark Harbors warrant a "row out"


        KK7B wro
        >
        > Very interesting discussion. The plumb bow does seem to be the right
        > choice when overall length is constrained. Here is a counter example
        > of what you get when waterline length is constrained (17') but overall
        > length (25') is free:
        >
        > http://knockaboutsloops.blogspot.com/2007/09/b-b-crowninshield-dark-harbor-17-12.html
        >
        > Beautiful--but that raises another design constraint: the customer's
        > idea of how a fast, safe, weatherly or seaworthy boat should look. If
        > one's idea of a boat was formed over years of daydreaming while gazing
        > at prints of B B Crowninshield yachts on the library wall, the
        > fieldmouse will appear strange. But now that several generations have
        > had scores of functional and well-considered Bolger boats and books to
        > sail and study perhaps our tastes are more highly evolved and open-minded.
        >
        > As to which is more seaworthy, that is a matter for pleasant
        > conversation and speculation. But bear in mind that the lifeboat you
        > step into as the Crowninshield yacht swamps and sinks is shaped very
        > much like the fieldmouse.
        >
        > Rick
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > "c.ruzer" <c.ruzer@...> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > http://rosslillistonewoodenboat.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/discussion-about-transom-bows-whimbrel.html
        > >
        >
        >
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