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Re: Oldshoe - rudder bottom plate and other things

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  • prairiedog2332
    David, Thanks for sharing your mods and experience sailing Oldshoe. I had the plans once and sold them - after buying a Micro - to a guy in Oz (I think), Wish
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 19, 2012
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      David,

      Thanks for sharing your mods and experience sailing Oldshoe.

      I had the plans once and sold them - after buying a Micro - to a guy in Oz (I think), Wish I had kept them as I moved and cannot find a suitable launch spot for the Micro. No secure rental slips close and even the ones further away are very expensive and with waiting lists.

      Have you considered an overhead shelter addition like suggested on the plans? I think PCB&F mentioned a small house addition - something like a truck cap in a MAIB article one time. Maybe like Supermouse shown in BWAOM? Every time I look at Supermouse  think that might work on Oldshoe. Just bolt it on if planning an overnighter, leave it home when day sailing.

      http://www.boatdesign.com/micro/letters/mnl07.htm

      Nels


      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "David" <dir_cobb@...> wrote:
      >
      > After two seasons sailing Oldshoe with the original rudder configuration I added a bottom plate as later advocated by Bolger and included in most of his later shallow rudder boats.
      >
      > I scaled down a little from the Chebacco plans I had and made a plate 8" wide by the length of the rudder (about 12") from a piece of 9mm plywood. The effect is really noticeable, with the rudder much more responsive than before. I found the boat has much less tendency to stall.
      >
      > I also added a simple pinboard to enable the tiller to be fixed as per plans. This really does turn the Oldshoe into a self-steering little cruiser. The only issue I found was that the boat is very sensitive to trim, so you effectively determine the course by deciding where to sit, as the trim of the boat modifies the underwater profile enormously. I have found you really have to create some heel to get her to sail/point best.
      >
      > Re-reading BWAOM, I believe this is what Bolger is referring to in his story about the lovers in the Micro as he talks about who sleeps where when sailing.
      >
      > I have spent many happy hours playing with Oldshoe and experimenting with the rig and playing with as many options as I can think of.
      >
      >
      > David
      > Santiago, Chile
      >

    • David
      Nels I too have looked at Supermouse and the Japanese Beach Cruiser as half brother and sisters to Oldshoe. The house installation is tempting. However, in the
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 21, 2012
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        Nels

        I too have looked at Supermouse and the Japanese Beach Cruiser as half brother and sisters to Oldshoe. The house installation is tempting. However, in the end, she sails so well as she is that I am not really tempted to mess with her. I am more tempted to build another bigger boat if I want a cuddy and sleeping space. Riging the poles and a tent over the cockpit would not be at all difficult although I really don't see the need (except possibly for fun).

        I took her sailing in the Quintero bay (the large bay North of Quintero, Chile) for a first time in the sea and she generated far more positive comments when she got back than when we were taking her out. She effectively silenced all those who had laughed and gave us a really nice ride.

        People were fascinated by the unstayed lightweight mast and the cat yawl rig. She gave us a really good ride for our money in a busy bay with plenty of large ships to sail round.

        In my experience Oldshoe is so unbelievable that she generates more real interest than any other boat I have seen. Oldshoe turns heads wherever she goes and people really cannot believe she goes the way she does.


        David

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "prairiedog2332" <arvent@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > David,
        >
        > Thanks for sharing your mods and experience sailing Oldshoe.
        >
        > I had the plans once and sold them - after buying a Micro - to a guy in
        > Oz (I think), Wish I had kept them as I moved and cannot find a suitable
        > launch spot for the Micro. No secure rental slips close and even the
        > ones further away are very expensive and with waiting lists.
        >
        > Have you considered an overhead shelter addition like suggested on the
        > plans? I think PCB&F mentioned a small house addition - something like a
        > truck cap in a MAIB article one time. Maybe like Supermouse shown in
        > BWAOM? Every time I look at Supermouse think that might work on
        > Oldshoe. Just bolt it on if planning an overnighter, leave it home when
        > day sailing.
        >
        > http://www.boatdesign.com/micro/letters/mnl07.htm
        > <http://www.boatdesign.com/micro/letters/mnl07.htm>
        >
        > Nels
        >
        >
        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "David" <dir_cobb@> wrote:
        > >
        > > After two seasons sailing Oldshoe with the original rudder
        > configuration I added a bottom plate as later advocated by Bolger and
        > included in most of his later shallow rudder boats.
        > >
        > > I scaled down a little from the Chebacco plans I had and made a plate
        > 8" wide by the length of the rudder (about 12") from a piece of 9mm
        > plywood. The effect is really noticeable, with the rudder much more
        > responsive than before. I found the boat has much less tendency to
        > stall.
        > >
        > > I also added a simple pinboard to enable the tiller to be fixed as per
        > plans. This really does turn the Oldshoe into a self-steering little
        > cruiser. The only issue I found was that the boat is very sensitive to
        > trim, so you effectively determine the course by deciding where to sit,
        > as the trim of the boat modifies the underwater profile enormously. I
        > have found you really have to create some heel to get her to sail/point
        > best.
        > >
        > > Re-reading BWAOM, I believe this is what Bolger is referring to in his
        > story about the lovers in the Micro as he talks about who sleeps where
        > when sailing.
        > >
        > > I have spent many happy hours playing with Oldshoe and experimenting
        > with the rig and playing with as many options as I can think of.
        > >
        > >
        > > David
        > > Santiago, Chile
        > >
        >
      • prairiedog2332
        David, The bay between Quintero and Las Vantanas looks like a great sailing area. I checked the weather and guess a good sun hat is maybe more important than
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 21, 2012
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          David,

          The bay between Quintero and Las Vantanas looks like a great sailing
          area. I checked the weather and guess a good sun hat is maybe more
          important than weather protection! I guess you get an onshore breeze
          most days? Lots of reaching opportunities. Bet a Light Scooner would be
          fun as well.

          Nels


          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "David" <dir_cobb@...> wrote:
          >
          > Nels
          >
          > I too have looked at Supermouse and the Japanese Beach Cruiser as half
          brother and sisters to Oldshoe. The house installation is tempting.
          However, in the end, she sails so well as she is that I am not really
          tempted to mess with her. I am more tempted to build another bigger boat
          if I want a cuddy and sleeping space. Riging the poles and a tent over
          the cockpit would not be at all difficult although I really don't see
          the need (except possibly for fun).
          >
          > I took her sailing in the Quintero bay (the large bay North of
          Quintero, Chile) for a first time in the sea and she generated far more
          positive comments when she got back than when we were taking her out.
          She effectively silenced all those who had laughed and gave us a really
          nice ride.
          >
          > People were fascinated by the unstayed lightweight mast and the cat
          yawl rig. She gave us a really good ride for our money in a busy bay
          with plenty of large ships to sail round.
          >
          > In my experience Oldshoe is so unbelievable that she generates more
          real interest than any other boat I have seen. Oldshoe turns heads
          wherever she goes and people really cannot believe she goes the way she
          does.
          >
          >
          > David
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