Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: rowboat

Expand Messages
  • gypsysfloat
    Wow, I was curious how long it s been that I ve been going to build my ultralight rowing boat... It s depressing... :-) Well, I still have the lofting
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 12, 2012
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Wow, I was curious how long it's been that I've been "going to build" my ultralight rowing boat... It's depressing... :-) Well, I still have the lofting stored away, and I still have no workshop! Can't work outside in the single-digit temperature snowbank either. I really am one of those builders Phil called "glacially slow!" IF it ever gets started I will post photo's... I'll just look at yours for now. I have added "Yellow leaf" to my to do list, if that can be called progress. :-)
      Garry

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "gypsyinvader" <bgwarber@...> wrote:
      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <hallman@> wrote:
      I built a boat to the lines of that Ultralight Rowing boat from BWAOM(which was taken from the article in Small Boat Journal, March\1983).
      Instead of the ultralight trussed framing, I chose to use the more conventional framing details taken from Bolger's Spur II (which I have also built, and which also is a great boat).
      Here are some photos of my build...
      http://sports.webshots.com/album/360982713bZwutE
      Even so, it is good lightweight boat. I find it no real problem to
      cartop and carry the boat single handed for some distance. By resting the boat upside down, with the center seat resting on my shoulders, I have carried it as far a 1,000 feet. As far as rowboats go, (and I
      have tried out more than a few), this is my favorite rowing boat.
      In my estimation, the boat has ergonomics for a rower about 5 foot 10 inches tall. If I were to build another, considering that I have the legs of a 6 feet tall person, I would be tempted to lengthen the boat by about 6 inches which would give a few more inches of leg room
      between the seats. Just a quibble, as-is, this rowboat still is the favorite in my fleet.

      Bruce,
      Very nice looking job. I have a planset, and I told Phil I wasn't going to use the truss braces also. He said it was fine, and that the ones that have been built none used his truss' . He said it wasn't really a serious thought anyway, but he'd love to see one built with them, then watch the person carry it in a stiff crosswind... :-) The plans call for a long ply covered foam box seat fore and aft , and you just slide back and forth to a comfortable fit. That sounds interesting to me, but it's main intent is positive floatation... He said it's like a non-vee guideboat, so I expect it to move well. He also said if the planking aft wants to lift off the form a bit, let it. The ones that did that went faster... :-) I've been "itching" to build for years now. My priorities must be out of whack! :-)
      Garry
    • John and Kathy Trussell
      Gary, Build time varies directly with the number of pieces in the boat. Finish time varies with the complexity of the pieces to be painted. The trussed framing
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 12, 2012
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment

        Gary,

         

        Build time varies directly with the number of pieces in the boat. Finish time varies with the complexity of the pieces to be painted. The trussed framing has a lot of fiddly little pieces and these will take a lot of time to fabricate and a lot of time to finish. The good news is that they could be built inside on a table and such a project would keep you happily and productively occupied throughout the winter!

         

        JohnT

         


        From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto: bolger@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of gypsysfloat
        Sent: Sunday, February 12, 2012 8:00 AM
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [bolger] Re: rowboat

         

         

        Wow, I was curious how long it's been that I've been "going to build" my ultralight rowing boat... It's depressing... :-) Well, I still have the lofting stored away, and I still have no workshop! Can't work outside in the single-digit temperature snowbank either. I really am one of those builders Phil called "glacially slow!" IF it ever gets started I will post photo's... I'll just look at yours for now. I have added "Yellow leaf" to my to do list, if that can be called progress. :-)
        Garry

        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "gypsyinvader" <bgwarber@...> wrote:
        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <hallman@> wrote:
        I built a boat to the lines of that Ultralight Rowing boat from BWAOM(which was taken from the article in Small Boat Journal, March\1983).
        Instead of the ultralight trussed framing, I chose to use the more conventional framing details taken from Bolger's Spur II (which I have also built, and which also is a great boat).
        Here are some photos of my build...
        http://sports.webshots.com/album/360982713bZwutE
        Even so, it is good lightweight boat. I find it no real problem to
        cartop and carry the boat single handed for some distance. By resting the boat upside down, with the center seat resting on my shoulders, I have carried it as far a 1,000 feet. As far as rowboats go, (and I
        have tried out more than a few), this is my favorite rowing boat.
        In my estimation, the boat has ergonomics for a rower about 5 foot 10 inches tall. If I were to build another, considering that I have the legs of a 6 feet tall person, I would be tempted to lengthen the boat by about 6 inches which would give a few more inches of leg room
        between the seats. Just a quibble, as-is, this rowboat still is the favorite in my fleet.

        Bruce,
        Very nice looking job. I have a planset, and I told Phil I wasn't going to use the truss braces also. He said it was fine, and that the ones that have been built none used his truss' . He said it wasn't really a serious thought anyway, but he'd love to see one built with them, then watch the person carry it in a stiff crosswind... :-) The plans call for a long ply covered foam box seat fore and aft , and you just slide back and forth to a comfortable fit. That sounds interesting to me, but it's main intent is positive floatation... He said it's like a non-vee guideboat, so I expect it to move well. He also said if the planking aft wants to lift off the form a bit, let it. The ones that did that went faster... :-) I've been "itching" to build for years now. My priorities must be out of whack! :-)
        Garry

      • gypsysfloat
        Perhaps, but the lofting is buried deeeeeep within the storage shed that is packed above the rafters... Would be fun though. Phill wrote that his description
        Message 3 of 15 , Feb 12, 2012
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Perhaps, but the lofting is buried deeeeeep within the storage shed that is packed above the rafters... Would be fun though. Phill wrote that his description was "aircraft" construction. Not so handy as a fly fishing boat that way though, I think...
          Garry

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "John and Kathy Trussell" <jtrussell2@...> wrote:
          >
          > Gary,
          >
          >
          >
          > Build time varies directly with the number of pieces in the boat. Finish
          > time varies with the complexity of the pieces to be painted. The trussed
          > framing has a lot of fiddly little pieces and these will take a lot of time
          > to fabricate and a lot of time to finish. The good news is that they could
          > be built inside on a table and such a project would keep you happily and
          > productively occupied throughout the winter!
          >
          >
          >
          > JohnT
          >
          >
          >
          > _____
          >
          > From: bolger@yahoogroups.com [mailto:bolger@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          > gypsysfloat
          > Sent: Sunday, February 12, 2012 8:00 AM
          > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [bolger] Re: rowboat
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Wow, I was curious how long it's been that I've been "going to build" my
          > ultralight rowing boat... It's depressing... :-) Well, I still have the
          > lofting stored away, and I still have no workshop! Can't work outside in the
          > single-digit temperature snowbank either. I really am one of those builders
          > Phil called "glacially slow!" IF it ever gets started I will post photo's...
          > I'll just look at yours for now. I have added "Yellow leaf" to my to do
          > list, if that can be called progress. :-)
          > Garry
          >
          > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> ,
          > "gypsyinvader" <bgwarber@> wrote:
          > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com <mailto:bolger%40yahoogroups.com> , Bruce
          > Hallman <hallman@> wrote:
          > I built a boat to the lines of that Ultralight Rowing boat from BWAOM(which
          > was taken from the article in Small Boat Journal, March\1983).
          > Instead of the ultralight trussed framing, I chose to use the more
          > conventional framing details taken from Bolger's Spur II (which I have also
          > built, and which also is a great boat).
          > Here are some photos of my build...
          > http://sports.webshots.com/album/360982713bZwutE
          > Even so, it is good lightweight boat. I find it no real problem to
          > cartop and carry the boat single handed for some distance. By resting the
          > boat upside down, with the center seat resting on my shoulders, I have
          > carried it as far a 1,000 feet. As far as rowboats go, (and I
          > have tried out more than a few), this is my favorite rowing boat.
          > In my estimation, the boat has ergonomics for a rower about 5 foot 10 inches
          > tall. If I were to build another, considering that I have the legs of a 6
          > feet tall person, I would be tempted to lengthen the boat by about 6 inches
          > which would give a few more inches of leg room
          > between the seats. Just a quibble, as-is, this rowboat still is the favorite
          > in my fleet.
          >
          > Bruce,
          > Very nice looking job. I have a planset, and I told Phil I wasn't going to
          > use the truss braces also. He said it was fine, and that the ones that have
          > been built none used his truss' . He said it wasn't really a serious thought
          > anyway, but he'd love to see one built with them, then watch the person
          > carry it in a stiff crosswind... :-) The plans call for a long ply covered
          > foam box seat fore and aft , and you just slide back and forth to a
          > comfortable fit. That sounds interesting to me, but it's main intent is
          > positive floatation... He said it's like a non-vee guideboat, so I expect it
          > to move well. He also said if the planking aft wants to lift off the form a
          > bit, let it. The ones that did that went faster... :-) I've been "itching"
          > to build for years now. My priorities must be out of whack! :-)
          > Garry
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.