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Micro Construction

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  • stevestatkus@ymail.com
    I have had a set of Micro plans for years and have gotten to the point where I m thinking of building the boat. I d like to correspond with others who have
    Message 1 of 28 , Dec 8, 2011
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      I have had a set of Micro plans for years and have gotten to the point where I'm thinking of building the boat. I'd like to correspond with others who have done so or are doing so.

      Thanks.
      Cincinnati OH
    • Rod Cahill
      Hi, Just finishing my Micro build in Bowning, Australia. It s modified a little. See Rods Micro pictures in the bolger group. Happy to assist if possible.
      Message 2 of 28 , Dec 8, 2011
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        Hi, Just finishing my Micro build in Bowning, Australia. It's modified a little. See Rods Micro pictures in the bolger group. Happy to assist if possible.

        From: "stevestatkus@..." <stevestatkus@...>
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, 9 December 2011 9:11 AM
        Subject: [bolger] Micro Construction

        I have had a set of Micro plans for years and have gotten to the point where I'm thinking of building the boat.  I'd like to correspond with others who have done so or are doing so.

        Thanks.
        Cincinnati OH 



        ------------------------------------

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        - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
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      • stevestatkus@ymail.com
        Rod, I checked out your photos. You ve built a long micro I believe. Looks pretty much the same as the original. One question I have is why is there only a
        Message 3 of 28 , Dec 9, 2011
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          Rod,

          I checked out your photos. You've built a long micro I believe. Looks pretty much the same as the original. One question I have is why is there only a single well to put your feet rather than a typical cockpit arrangement? What goes below the seats?
          Is it cumbersome getting into the cabin from the cockpit?

          Steve


          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Rod Cahill <rod_cahill@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi, Just finishing my Micro build in Bowning, Australia. It's modified a little. See Rods Micro pictures in the bolger group. Happy to assist if possible.
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: "stevestatkus@..." <stevestatkus@...>
          > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Friday, 9 December 2011 9:11 AM
          > Subject: [bolger] Micro Construction
          >
          > I have had a set of Micro plans for years and have gotten to the point where I'm thinking of building the boat.  I'd like to correspond with others who have done so or are doing so.
          >
          > Thanks.
          > Cincinnati OH 
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Bolger rules!!!
          > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!!  Please!
          > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
          > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
          > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
          > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
          > - Unsubscribe:  bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
        • William
          Steve, I think Rod built a Micro, but made a mast tabernacle. His cockpit appears to be true to the plans- a foot well with removable cover. This arrangement
          Message 4 of 28 , Dec 11, 2011
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            Steve,
            I think Rod built a Micro, but made a mast tabernacle. His cockpit appears to be true to the plans- a foot well with removable cover. This arrangement provides much more interior and storage space than a regular cockpit with lockers with lids.

            I built a Long Micro, so I might be able to offer some guidance along your build. At one time I also lived in the Queen City, so my professional advice is to fuel your dreams with occasional trips for Skyline chili. Please keep the list posted as you progress. We like pictures!

            Best,
            Bill and Pugnacious (the Long Micro)
            Texas

            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "stevestatkus@..." <stevestatkus@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Rod,
            >
            > I checked out your photos. You've built a long micro I believe. Looks pretty much the same as the original. One question I have is why is there only a single well to put your feet rather than a typical cockpit arrangement? What goes below the seats?
            > Is it cumbersome getting into the cabin from the cockpit?
            >
            > Steve
            >
            >
            > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Rod Cahill <rod_cahill@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi, Just finishing my Micro build in Bowning, Australia. It's modified a little. See Rods Micro pictures in the bolger group. Happy to assist if possible.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ________________________________
            > > From: "stevestatkus@" <stevestatkus@>
            > > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            > > Sent: Friday, 9 December 2011 9:11 AM
            > > Subject: [bolger] Micro Construction
            > >
            > > I have had a set of Micro plans for years and have gotten to the point where I'm thinking of building the boat.  I'd like to correspond with others who have done so or are doing so.
            > >
            > > Thanks.
            > > Cincinnati OH 
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Bolger rules!!!
            > > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!!  Please!
            > > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
            > > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
            > > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
            > > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
            > > - Unsubscribe:  bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            > >
            >
          • stevestatkus@ymail.com
            Bill, I m considering building a sailboat either the Micro or Long Micro. I have the plans for the Micro and just ordered the plans for the Long Micro. Here s
            Message 5 of 28 , Dec 17, 2011
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              Bill,

              I'm considering building a sailboat either the Micro or Long Micro. I have the plans for the Micro and just ordered the plans for the Long Micro.

              Here's my thoughts on how I would use the boat. It would be a trailering deal. A couple of days aboard then the motel. I could be pulling this thing coast to coast. Again, a few days camp cruising mostly.

              A few conserns: cooking aboard, sea keeping as my cruising grounds would be the Great Lakes, Chesapeake, and San Juans. So, how do you cook aboard? What's with the foot well in place of a traditional cockpit? And why the wet aft area? Also, how does one reduce sail with that pole across the main sail? Can you sit up in the cabin?

              I'm leaning towards the Micro as this would be more doable with the space I have and I think it looks better than the long. Not too sure what the Long brings over the Micro.

              Your thoughts.

              Thanks.

              Steve

              ps. Skyline once a month is my limit but I could probably bump that up to twice a month if I went a bit easier on the hot sauce.

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "William" <kingw@...> wrote:
              >
              > Steve,
              > I think Rod built a Micro, but made a mast tabernacle. His cockpit appears to be true to the plans- a foot well with removable cover. This arrangement provides much more interior and storage space than a regular cockpit with lockers with lids.
              >
              > I built a Long Micro, so I might be able to offer some guidance along your build. At one time I also lived in the Queen City, so my professional advice is to fuel your dreams with occasional trips for Skyline chili. Please keep the list posted as you progress. We like pictures!
              >
              > Best,
              > Bill and Pugnacious (the Long Micro)
              > Texas
              >
              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "stevestatkus@" <stevestatkus@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > Rod,
              > >
              > > I checked out your photos. You've built a long micro I believe. Looks pretty much the same as the original. One question I have is why is there only a single well to put your feet rather than a typical cockpit arrangement? What goes below the seats?
              > > Is it cumbersome getting into the cabin from the cockpit?
              > >
              > > Steve
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Rod Cahill <rod_cahill@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Hi, Just finishing my Micro build in Bowning, Australia. It's modified a little. See Rods Micro pictures in the bolger group. Happy to assist if possible.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > ________________________________
              > > > From: "stevestatkus@" <stevestatkus@>
              > > > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              > > > Sent: Friday, 9 December 2011 9:11 AM
              > > > Subject: [bolger] Micro Construction
              > > >
              > > > I have had a set of Micro plans for years and have gotten to the point where I'm thinking of building the boat.  I'd like to correspond with others who have done so or are doing so.
              > > >
              > > > Thanks.
              > > > Cincinnati OH 
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > ------------------------------------
              > > >
              > > > Bolger rules!!!
              > > > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!!  Please!
              > > > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
              > > > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
              > > > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
              > > > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
              > > > - Unsubscribe:  bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > > > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Yahoo! Groups Links
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • William
              Steve, 1. Cooking aboard. I almost always singlehand, especially when I am cruising, so I do not cook while underway. On the Long Micro (LM) there is a
              Message 6 of 28 , Dec 19, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Steve,
                1. Cooking aboard. I almost always singlehand, especially when I am cruising, so I do not cook while underway. On the Long Micro (LM) there is a small, flat galley area at the bow-end of the cabin. You could put a small stove there, prepare food, cook, etc., and that's how the plans are drawn. I store piles of stuff on that galley space, so instead I cook at the stern-end of the cabin, beneath the companionway. I use a small, single-burner alcohol stove (placed on the cabin sole between my feet) and cook single pot meals. It is usually too windy to cook in the cockpit. I have lived on Pug for two weeks at a time, so your plan for a few days' adventure is very reasonable.
                2. Seakeeping ability. M's and LM's are designed for relatively smooth waters and winds of less than 20 knots. Sailing in conditions other than these is not optimal but is possible within reason. I have sailed my LM in conditions that I viewed as pretty darned hairy and I view these as MY limits. The boat will handle a lot worse but you won't be having fun. Pug and I have sailed on Lake Erie, the North Channel of Lake Huron, and a small lake in Texas.

                She will not point like a plastic sloop with a deep keel and a jib, but she will go to windward in winds in the low 20-knot range (provided the waves aren't too big). She will motor into winds of ~22 knots despite nasty, steep chop of about 3-4 feet. The waves will wash over the bow, along the cabintop, and into the cockpit. The boat will do about 1 knot over ground at full throttle and the prop will occasionally pull out of the water. Not fun, but doable if you must get to windward. Off the wind she will handle winds in the high-20 knot range. I have sailed her in waves so tall they hid the horizon (which is a 50 inch wave). I have also had Pug knocked onto her side, the masthead a few feet from the water, and she righted herself in a reassuring manner. If you want to read about REAL Micro adventures on the big water, read Roger Keyes' accounts of sailing Paloma Blanca in the waters south of Australia (in the "Bolger 7" group, under the Paloma Blanca files). One of my favorites is his trip to Kangaroo Island
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger7/files/Paloma%20Blanca/

                3. The footwell in the cockpit provides a cavern of storage space under the cockpit. If you are going cruising with another person you should build the cockpit to the plans because there isn't enough space in the cabin for two people to sleep and stow their gear. The plans show an easy-to-build, simple, yet practical storage space. Classic Bolger. Building a traditional cockpit sole with lockers (as I did), takes more time, is more complicated, weighs more, and provides less storage space than what is drawn on the plans. It does, however, provide readily accessible storage space in the cockpit for fenders, boat hooks, lines, etc.

                4. Free-flooding wells in the bow and stern keep dirty anchors and outboard gas tanks away from the interior of the boat. The wells are easily washed with a bucket of water and they drain overboard. They also prevent people from sitting in the stern and making the boat slow.

                5. You reef the main by dropping the sail onto the deck. You either drop the boom (as I do) onto the deck, or you could rig a topping lift to hold the boom. Attach the tack of the sail to its reefed position, a tie in the reef points, attach the clew to the reefed position, and raise the reefed sail. There are other ways to reef a sprit-boom rig (reefing the luff towards the mast), but the one drawn on the plans works best for me. With a little experience you can shake-out a reef while sailing close-hauled and without dropping the sail.

                6. I am 6 foot, four inches tall and I can sit in the cabin without hitting my head.

                7. LM's longer WL provides greater speed. The bunks sit side-by-side and with a little work you can make one, big bunk platform (good for snuggling). The foot of the M's bunks extend under the bridgedeck, so only hand-holding. I find the longer lines of the LM more pleasing to my eye, but it is a slab-sided sharpie with a blunt bow so "pleasing" is a relative term. No disrespect intended to my Micro brethren and sisters.

                Bill, Long Micro Pugnacious, in Texas


                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "stevestatkus@..." <stevestatkus@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Bill,
                >
                > I'm considering building a sailboat either the Micro or Long Micro. I have the plans for the Micro and just ordered the plans for the Long Micro.
                >
                > Here's my thoughts on how I would use the boat. It would be a trailering deal. A couple of days aboard then the motel. I could be pulling this thing coast to coast. Again, a few days camp cruising mostly.
                >
                > A few conserns: cooking aboard, sea keeping as my cruising grounds would be the Great Lakes, Chesapeake, and San Juans. So, how do you cook aboard? What's with the foot well in place of a traditional cockpit? And why the wet aft area? Also, how does one reduce sail with that pole across the main sail? Can you sit up in the cabin?
                >
                > I'm leaning towards the Micro as this would be more doable with the space I have and I think it looks better than the long. Not too sure what the Long brings over the Micro.
                >
                > Your thoughts.
                >
                > Thanks.
                >
                > Steve
                >
                > ps. Skyline once a month is my limit but I could probably bump that up to twice a month if I went a bit easier on the hot sauce.
                >
                > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "William" <kingw@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Steve,
                > > I think Rod built a Micro, but made a mast tabernacle. His cockpit appears to be true to the plans- a foot well with removable cover. This arrangement provides much more interior and storage space than a regular cockpit with lockers with lids.
                > >
                > > I built a Long Micro, so I might be able to offer some guidance along your build. At one time I also lived in the Queen City, so my professional advice is to fuel your dreams with occasional trips for Skyline chili. Please keep the list posted as you progress. We like pictures!
                > >
                > > Best,
                > > Bill and Pugnacious (the Long Micro)
                > > Texas
                > >
                > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "stevestatkus@" <stevestatkus@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Rod,
                > > >
                > > > I checked out your photos. You've built a long micro I believe. Looks pretty much the same as the original. One question I have is why is there only a single well to put your feet rather than a typical cockpit arrangement? What goes below the seats?
                > > > Is it cumbersome getting into the cabin from the cockpit?
                > > >
                > > > Steve
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Rod Cahill <rod_cahill@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Hi, Just finishing my Micro build in Bowning, Australia. It's modified a little. See Rods Micro pictures in the bolger group. Happy to assist if possible.
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > ________________________________
                > > > > From: "stevestatkus@" <stevestatkus@>
                > > > > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                > > > > Sent: Friday, 9 December 2011 9:11 AM
                > > > > Subject: [bolger] Micro Construction
                > > > >
                > > > > I have had a set of Micro plans for years and have gotten to the point where I'm thinking of building the boat.  I'd like to correspond with others who have done so or are doing so.
                > > > >
                > > > > Thanks.
                > > > > Cincinnati OH 
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > ------------------------------------
                > > > >
                > > > > Bolger rules!!!
                > > > > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!!  Please!
                > > > > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
                > > > > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                > > > > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                > > > > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                > > > > - Unsubscribe:  bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > > > > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Yahoo! Groups Links
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • steve statkus
                Bill, Thanks for the info. Still waiting for my LM plans and I ve started on a 1 in. = 1 ft. model of the Micro from the plans I have. Scale models help me
                Message 7 of 28 , Dec 21, 2011
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                  Bill,

                  Thanks for the info.  Still waiting for my LM plans and I've started on a 1 in. = 1 ft. model of the Micro from the plans I have.  Scale models help me understand the ergonomics of things I'll be moving about within.
                  I've run across a fellow in FL who has a Micro for sale.  My wife and I will be in FL this Feb. so I've made arrangements to look at his boat.  I'll be taking a tow hitch and check book just in case.
                  What do you think about a 2 hp outboard?  Too small?
                  My thinking is turning to day sailing with the wife and if I want to overnight it'll probably be just me, at least after the first time.  She's pretty adventurous but she does have her standards. 
                  I'll keep you posted.

                  Steve 

                  On Mon, Dec 19, 2011 at 11:02 AM, William <kingw@...> wrote:
                   

                  Steve,
                  1. Cooking aboard. I almost always singlehand, especially when I am cruising, so I do not cook while underway. On the Long Micro (LM) there is a small, flat galley area at the bow-end of the cabin. You could put a small stove there, prepare food, cook, etc., and that's how the plans are drawn. I store piles of stuff on that galley space, so instead I cook at the stern-end of the cabin, beneath the companionway. I use a small, single-burner alcohol stove (placed on the cabin sole between my feet) and cook single pot meals. It is usually too windy to cook in the cockpit. I have lived on Pug for two weeks at a time, so your plan for a few days' adventure is very reasonable.
                  2. Seakeeping ability. M's and LM's are designed for relatively smooth waters and winds of less than 20 knots. Sailing in conditions other than these is not optimal but is possible within reason. I have sailed my LM in conditions that I viewed as pretty darned hairy and I view these as MY limits. The boat will handle a lot worse but you won't be having fun. Pug and I have sailed on Lake Erie, the North Channel of Lake Huron, and a small lake in Texas.

                  She will not point like a plastic sloop with a deep keel and a jib, but she will go to windward in winds in the low 20-knot range (provided the waves aren't too big). She will motor into winds of ~22 knots despite nasty, steep chop of about 3-4 feet. The waves will wash over the bow, along the cabintop, and into the cockpit. The boat will do about 1 knot over ground at full throttle and the prop will occasionally pull out of the water. Not fun, but doable if you must get to windward. Off the wind she will handle winds in the high-20 knot range. I have sailed her in waves so tall they hid the horizon (which is a 50 inch wave). I have also had Pug knocked onto her side, the masthead a few feet from the water, and she righted herself in a reassuring manner. If you want to read about REAL Micro adventures on the big water, read Roger Keyes' accounts of sailing Paloma Blanca in the waters south of Australia (in the "Bolger 7" group, under the Paloma Blanca files). One of my favorites is his trip to Kangaroo Island
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger7/files/Paloma%20Blanca/

                  3. The footwell in the cockpit provides a cavern of storage space under the cockpit. If you are going cruising with another person you should build the cockpit to the plans because there isn't enough space in the cabin for two people to sleep and stow their gear. The plans show an easy-to-build, simple, yet practical storage space. Classic Bolger. Building a traditional cockpit sole with lockers (as I did), takes more time, is more complicated, weighs more, and provides less storage space than what is drawn on the plans. It does, however, provide readily accessible storage space in the cockpit for fenders, boat hooks, lines, etc.

                  4. Free-flooding wells in the bow and stern keep dirty anchors and outboard gas tanks away from the interior of the boat. The wells are easily washed with a bucket of water and they drain overboard. They also prevent people from sitting in the stern and making the boat slow.

                  5. You reef the main by dropping the sail onto the deck. You either drop the boom (as I do) onto the deck, or you could rig a topping lift to hold the boom. Attach the tack of the sail to its reefed position, a tie in the reef points, attach the clew to the reefed position, and raise the reefed sail. There are other ways to reef a sprit-boom rig (reefing the luff towards the mast), but the one drawn on the plans works best for me. With a little experience you can shake-out a reef while sailing close-hauled and without dropping the sail.

                  6. I am 6 foot, four inches tall and I can sit in the cabin without hitting my head.

                  7. LM's longer WL provides greater speed. The bunks sit side-by-side and with a little work you can make one, big bunk platform (good for snuggling). The foot of the M's bunks extend under the bridgedeck, so only hand-holding. I find the longer lines of the LM more pleasing to my eye, but it is a slab-sided sharpie with a blunt bow so "pleasing" is a relative term. No disrespect intended to my Micro brethren and sisters.

                  Bill, Long Micro Pugnacious, in Texas


                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "stevestatkus@..." <stevestatkus@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Bill,
                  >
                  > I'm considering building a sailboat either the Micro or Long Micro. I have the plans for the Micro and just ordered the plans for the Long Micro.
                  >
                  > Here's my thoughts on how I would use the boat. It would be a trailering deal. A couple of days aboard then the motel. I could be pulling this thing coast to coast. Again, a few days camp cruising mostly.
                  >
                  > A few conserns: cooking aboard, sea keeping as my cruising grounds would be the Great Lakes, Chesapeake, and San Juans. So, how do you cook aboard? What's with the foot well in place of a traditional cockpit? And why the wet aft area? Also, how does one reduce sail with that pole across the main sail? Can you sit up in the cabin?
                  >
                  > I'm leaning towards the Micro as this would be more doable with the space I have and I think it looks better than the long. Not too sure what the Long brings over the Micro.
                  >
                  > Your thoughts.
                  >
                  > Thanks.
                  >
                  > Steve
                  >
                  > ps. Skyline once a month is my limit but I could probably bump that up to twice a month if I went a bit easier on the hot sauce.
                  >
                  > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "William" <kingw@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Steve,
                  > > I think Rod built a Micro, but made a mast tabernacle. His cockpit appears to be true to the plans- a foot well with removable cover. This arrangement provides much more interior and storage space than a regular cockpit with lockers with lids.
                  > >
                  > > I built a Long Micro, so I might be able to offer some guidance along your build. At one time I also lived in the Queen City, so my professional advice is to fuel your dreams with occasional trips for Skyline chili. Please keep the list posted as you progress. We like pictures!
                  > >
                  > > Best,
                  > > Bill and Pugnacious (the Long Micro)
                  > > Texas
                  > >
                  > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "stevestatkus@" <stevestatkus@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Rod,
                  > > >
                  > > > I checked out your photos. You've built a long micro I believe. Looks pretty much the same as the original. One question I have is why is there only a single well to put your feet rather than a typical cockpit arrangement? What goes below the seats?
                  > > > Is it cumbersome getting into the cabin from the cockpit?
                  > > >
                  > > > Steve
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Rod Cahill <rod_cahill@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Hi, Just finishing my Micro build in Bowning, Australia. It's modified a little. See Rods Micro pictures in the bolger group. Happy to assist if possible.
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > ________________________________
                  > > > > From: "stevestatkus@" <stevestatkus@>
                  > > > > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                  > > > > Sent: Friday, 9 December 2011 9:11 AM
                  > > > > Subject: [bolger] Micro Construction
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I have had a set of Micro plans for years and have gotten to the point where I'm thinking of building the boat.  I'd like to correspond with others who have done so or are doing so.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Thanks.
                  > > > > Cincinnati OH 
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > ------------------------------------
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Bolger rules!!!
                  > > > > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!!  Please!
                  > > > > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
                  > > > > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                  > > > > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                  > > > > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                  > > > > - Unsubscribe:  bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  > > > > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >


                • MylesJ. Swift
                  Steve, When I built Micro we did a lot of weekending. The interior is bigger than your mental picture. Micro is more than you need for single handed camping.
                  Message 8 of 28 , Dec 22, 2011
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                    Steve,

                     

                    When I built Micro we did a lot of weekending. The interior is bigger than your mental picture. Micro is more than you need for single handed camping. The extra plan form stability makes it really nice and easy.

                     

                    MylesJ

                  • William
                    Steve, A 2hp outboard is a bit small, but it depends where you sail. How far to the dock, mooring, or ramp? Are the waters protected? Tides? What happens if
                    Message 9 of 28 , Dec 23, 2011
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                      Steve,
                      A 2hp outboard is a bit small, but it depends where you sail. How far to the dock, mooring, or ramp? Are the waters protected? Tides? What happens if you get caught out in a sudden blow, or the wind dies? People have powered their M's and LM's with a yuloh, sweeps/oars, oatboards, and (I suspect) electric OBs. I think a 2hp would suffice at first, and if you discover the need for more power, you can upgrade.
                      Bill, in Texas

                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, steve statkus <stevestatkus@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Bill,
                      >
                      > Thanks for the info. Still waiting for my LM plans and I've started on a 1
                      > in. = 1 ft. model of the Micro from the plans I have. Scale models help me
                      > understand the ergonomics of things I'll be moving about within.
                      > I've run across a fellow in FL who has a Micro for sale. My wife and I
                      > will be in FL this Feb. so I've made arrangements to look at his boat.
                      > I'll be taking a tow hitch and check book just in case.
                      > What do you think about a 2 hp outboard? Too small?
                      > My thinking is turning to day sailing with the wife and if I want to
                      > overnight it'll probably be just me, at least after the first time. She's
                      > pretty adventurous but she does have her standards.
                      > I'll keep you posted.
                      >
                      > Steve
                      >>>>>>> snip <<<<<<<<
                    • MylesJ. Swift
                      I exchanged mail with Mr. Bolger on the point of how much power is enough for Micro. He said 8 hp to get in reliably against wind and tide. I d been using a
                      Message 10 of 28 , Dec 24, 2011
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                        I exchanged mail with Mr. Bolger on the point of how much power is enough for Micro. He said 8 hp to get in reliably against wind and tide. I’d been using a 3hp to get in and out of the marina on a lake that regularly gets 20-25 winds in the afternoon. On a lake 2-3hp works but I would not want to be heading upwind or against a current for any distance without something bigger.

                         

                        MylesJ

                      • dnjost
                        Steve - I built and sailed my Micro for a short while prior to selling it to get into another boat project. A couple of thoughts. It is a fun little boat,
                        Message 11 of 28 , Dec 26, 2011
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                          Steve -

                          I built and sailed my Micro for a short while prior to selling it to get into another boat project. A couple of thoughts.

                          It is a fun little boat, perhaps the most fun I have had on a boat under 16'. Very capable little cruiser

                          It is not a windward monster, in that choppy seas create a lot of leeway when trying to go to windward. Leave a lot of space when tacking. It sailed like any other cat in smoother waters.

                          4 HP longshaft was perfect.

                          I never cooked on board, but think that you could put a camp stove on deck and stand in the cockpit locker, or cabin to do the honors.

                          I am between sailboats right now, but thoroughly enjoy the 18' work skiff.

                          David Jost
                        • dnjost
                          I agree with Myles here. The cabin is very well suited to overnighting or short cruising. It is very comfortable.
                          Message 12 of 28 , Dec 26, 2011
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                            I agree with Myles here. The cabin is very well suited to overnighting or short cruising. It is very comfortable.


                            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "MylesJ. Swift" <mswift@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Steve,
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > When I built Micro we did a lot of weekending. The interior is bigger than
                            > your mental picture. Micro is more than you need for single handed camping.
                            > The extra plan form stability makes it really nice and easy.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > MylesJ
                            >
                          • Jack & Lois Bearden
                            Just have a question regarding engine size to hull speed ratio. A 2.5 Yamaha 4 stroke will get my Micro up to hull speed (I believe approximately 4.5 kts.) If
                            Message 13 of 28 , Dec 26, 2011
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                              Just have a question regarding engine size to hull speed ratio. A 2.5
                              Yamaha 4 stroke will get my Micro up to hull speed (I believe
                              approximately 4.5 kts.) If I increase power the boat will not go faster.
                              Only the bow wave will increase. So my question is what advantage can be
                              gained by increasing power, especially against current or tide? I know
                              that Peter Lennihan once used a 20 horsepower motor on his micro to
                              prevent it from being swept over a water fall during a movie shoot. So
                              I'm convinced the extra power works. I just don't understand why. An
                              answer that requires no more that high school physics to understand
                              would be appreciated. Thanks.

                              jeb
                            • John Kohnen
                              When you try to push a displacement boat faster than hull speed the amount of horsepower needed to go faster increases very quickly. Going from 2.5 hp. to 5
                              Message 14 of 28 , Dec 26, 2011
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                                When you try to push a displacement boat faster than "hull speed" the
                                amount of horsepower needed to go faster increases very quickly. Going
                                from 2.5 hp. to 5 hp., say, might not make much difference in the top
                                speed of a Micro. Using 20 hp. might make a Micro go noticeably faster,
                                but I'll bet the wake was spectacular! Like watching the tugboat races. <g>

                                The reason you want some extra power over what you need to reach hull
                                speed in calm conditions is so you can overcome the windage when bucking a
                                strong wind. Even motoring crooswind when it breezes up a feeble motor
                                might not have the oomph for decent steering. A friend of mine has a
                                Birdwatcher 2 that really speeds along with a 2 hp. motor in light winds,
                                but he's discovered that if he tries to go against a 25 mph. (or somewhere
                                around that, I don't recall exactly) with the mast up he barely he barely
                                moves. Extra power will also help the boat keep moving against a chop.

                                Another nice thing about having extra power is that in easy conditions the
                                engine will be more pleasant to live with as it (relatively) quietly putts
                                along at part throttle at cruising speed. :o)

                                On Mon, 26 Dec 2011 07:52:22 -0800, Jeb wrote:

                                > Just have a question regarding engine size to hull speed ratio. A 2.5
                                > Yamaha 4 stroke will get my Micro up to hull speed (I believe
                                > approximately 4.5 kts.) If I increase power the boat will not go faster.
                                > Only the bow wave will increase. So my question is what advantage can be
                                > gained by increasing power, especially against current or tide?
                                > ...


                                --
                                John (jkohnen@...)
                                Sin lies only in hurting others unnecessarily. All other "sins"
                                are invented nonsense. (Robert A. Heinlein)
                              • John Weiss
                                You may get no benefit from more HP. If you get hull speed with 1/2 throttle or so, then there is no reason to upgrade, since you have plenty of reserve for
                                Message 15 of 28 , Dec 26, 2011
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                                  You may get no benefit from more HP. If you get hull speed with 1/2
                                  throttle or so, then there is no reason to upgrade, since you have
                                  plenty of reserve for wind and waves.

                                  OTOH, there may be a reason to go to a finer-pitch prop, so you can take
                                  advantage of the higher RPM and greater power without simply cavitating
                                  the prop. Yamaha used to make specific sail versions of their 10HP
                                  motor, with a fine-pitch prop and fat blades. I had one on my 25' San
                                  Juan 7.7, and it worked MUCH better than the old 10HP Honda it replaced.


                                  On 12/26/2011 07:52, Jack & Lois Bearden wrote:
                                  > Just have a question regarding engine size to hull speed ratio. A 2.5
                                  > Yamaha 4 stroke will get my Micro up to hull speed (I believe
                                  > approximately 4.5 kts.) If I increase power the boat will not go faster.
                                  > Only the bow wave will increase. So my question is what advantage can be
                                  > gained by increasing power, especially against current or tide? I know
                                  > that Peter Lennihan once used a 20 horsepower motor on his micro to
                                  > prevent it from being swept over a water fall during a movie shoot. So
                                  > I'm convinced the extra power works. I just don't understand why. An
                                  > answer that requires no more that high school physics to understand
                                  > would be appreciated. Thanks.
                                • steve statkus
                                  Bill, Thanks for the input. I ve never owned an outboard but I do fly a 65 hp Aeronca and understand the limitations of low hp. My first thought was that it
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Dec 27, 2011
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                                    Bill,

                                    Thanks for the input.  I've never owned an outboard but I do fly a 65 hp Aeronca and understand the limitations of low hp.  My first thought was that it was on the low end but around my home in SW Ohio we have only man made lakes, excluding the Ohio river.  I'll keep you posted.

                                    Steve  

                                    On Fri, Dec 23, 2011 at 8:39 PM, William <kingw@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    Steve,
                                    A 2hp outboard is a bit small, but it depends where you sail. How far to the dock, mooring, or ramp? Are the waters protected? Tides? What happens if you get caught out in a sudden blow, or the wind dies? People have powered their M's and LM's with a yuloh, sweeps/oars, oatboards, and (I suspect) electric OBs. I think a 2hp would suffice at first, and if you discover the need for more power, you can upgrade.
                                    Bill, in Texas



                                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, steve statkus <stevestatkus@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Bill,
                                    >
                                    > Thanks for the info. Still waiting for my LM plans and I've started on a 1
                                    > in. = 1 ft. model of the Micro from the plans I have. Scale models help me
                                    > understand the ergonomics of things I'll be moving about within.
                                    > I've run across a fellow in FL who has a Micro for sale. My wife and I
                                    > will be in FL this Feb. so I've made arrangements to look at his boat.
                                    > I'll be taking a tow hitch and check book just in case.
                                    > What do you think about a 2 hp outboard? Too small?
                                    > My thinking is turning to day sailing with the wife and if I want to
                                    > overnight it'll probably be just me, at least after the first time. She's
                                    > pretty adventurous but she does have her standards.
                                    > I'll keep you posted.
                                    >
                                    > Steve
                                    >>>>>>> snip <<<<<<<<


                                  • prairiedog2332
                                    I recall a thread on another group involving going off-shore in a Micro or Long Micro and one member gave PCB&F a call for their thoughts. Their main concerns
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Dec 27, 2011
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                                      I recall a thread on another group involving going off-shore in a Micro or Long Micro and one member gave PCB&F a call for their thoughts. Their main concerns involved having the power to claw off a lee shore in a blow.

                                      Micro's 12' waterline length is an issue in that regard. They mentioned a jump over to Nova Scotia from the mainline would be doable but any longer than that the LM would be the preferred hull. They recommended a 9.9 high thrust Yamaha as being the motor of choice, being very dependable, quiet and only needing to run it at about 1/3 throttle and partly because it also has a fairly good alternator to keep your nav and communication systems fully charged up.

                                      Tohatsu now has a 6 HP high thrust that might be an option, but is only 1 cylinder (Less torque, more vibration.) than thed 2 cylinder 9.8's.

                                      http://www.outboard-engine.com/enginespecs.php?recordID=177

                                      Nels

                                       


                                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, steve statkus <stevestatkus@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Bill,
                                      >
                                      > Thanks for the input. I've never owned an outboard but I do fly a 65 hp
                                      > Aeronca and understand the limitations of low hp. My first thought was
                                      > that it was on the low end but around my home in SW Ohio we have only man
                                      > made lakes, excluding the Ohio river. I'll keep you posted.
                                      >
                                      > Steve
                                      >
                                      > On Fri, Dec 23, 2011 at 8:39 PM, William kingw@... wrote:
                                      >
                                      > > **
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Steve,
                                      > > A 2hp outboard is a bit small, but it depends where you sail. How far to
                                      > > the dock, mooring, or ramp? Are the waters protected? Tides? What happens
                                      > > if you get caught out in a sudden blow, or the wind dies? People have
                                      > > powered their M's and LM's with a yuloh, sweeps/oars, oatboards, and (I
                                      > > suspect) electric OBs. I think a 2hp would suffice at first, and if you
                                      > > discover the need for more power, you can upgrade.
                                      > > Bill, in Texas
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, steve statkus stevestatkus@ wrote:
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Bill,
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Thanks for the info. Still waiting for my LM plans and I've started on a
                                      > > 1
                                      > > > in. = 1 ft. model of the Micro from the plans I have. Scale models help
                                      > > me
                                      > > > understand the ergonomics of things I'll be moving about within.
                                      > > > I've run across a fellow in FL who has a Micro for sale. My wife and I
                                      > > > will be in FL this Feb. so I've made arrangements to look at his boat.
                                      > > > I'll be taking a tow hitch and check book just in case.
                                      > > > What do you think about a 2 hp outboard? Too small?
                                      > > > My thinking is turning to day sailing with the wife and if I want to
                                      > > > overnight it'll probably be just me, at least after the first time. She's
                                      > > > pretty adventurous but she does have her standards.
                                      > > > I'll keep you posted.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Steve
                                      > > >>>>>>> snip <<<<<<<<
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      >

                                    • Peter
                                      ... I ve never sailed any version of Micro, but I ve sailed in plenty of shoal draft boats, including my Hunter 28. There comes a point where a wave crest
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Dec 28, 2011
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                                        > I recall a thread on another group involving going off-shore in a Micro
                                        > or Long Micro and one member gave PCB&F a call for their thoughts. Their
                                        > main concerns involved having the power to claw off a lee shore in a
                                        > blow.

                                        I've never sailed any version of Micro, but I've sailed in plenty of shoal draft boats, including my Hunter 28. There comes a point where a wave crest picks a boat up and shoves it several feet to leeward. If it happens too often, you can't make any progress upwind. Light boats would be more susceptible than heavy boats.

                                        > Tohatsu now has a 6 HP high thrust that might be an option, but is only
                                        > 1 cylinder (Less torque, more vibration.) than the 2 cylinder 9.8's.

                                        I was surprised to read the recommendations for fairly heavy and powerful OBs. I used a 5hp in my 2250lb Capri 22, and it was more than enough power for just about any situation. However, they may have been thinking of powering for longer times and distances, and wanted to run at a lower throttle setting.
                                      • Harry James
                                        I use a 6hp Tohatsu on my 7,000lb Pearson Triton here in SE AK since 2007. Works well, gives me 5 kts towing an Elegant Punt. HJ
                                        Message 19 of 28 , Dec 28, 2011
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                                          I use a 6hp Tohatsu on my 7,000lb Pearson Triton here in SE AK since
                                          2007. Works well, gives me 5 kts towing an Elegant Punt.

                                          HJ

                                          On 12/28/2011 8:08 AM, Peter wrote:
                                          >> I recall a thread on another group involving going off-shore in a Micro
                                          >> or Long Micro and one member gave PCB&F a call for their thoughts. Their
                                          >> main concerns involved having the power to claw off a lee shore in a
                                          >> blow.
                                          > I've never sailed any version of Micro, but I've sailed in plenty of shoal draft boats, including my Hunter 28. There comes a point where a wave crest picks a boat up and shoves it several feet to leeward. If it happens too often, you can't make any progress upwind. Light boats would be more susceptible than heavy boats.
                                          >
                                          >> Tohatsu now has a 6 HP high thrust that might be an option, but is only
                                          >> 1 cylinder (Less torque, more vibration.) than the 2 cylinder 9.8's.
                                          > I was surprised to read the recommendations for fairly heavy and powerful OBs. I used a 5hp in my 2250lb Capri 22, and it was more than enough power for just about any situation. However, they may have been thinking of powering for longer times and distances, and wanted to run at a lower throttle setting.
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > ------------------------------------
                                          >
                                          > Bolger rules!!!
                                          > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!! Please!
                                          > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
                                          > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                                          > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                                          > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                                          > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                          > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Yahoo! Groups Links
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                        • prairiedog2332
                                          ... powerful OBs. I used a 5hp in my 2250lb Capri 22, and it was more than enough power for just about any situation. However, they may have been thinking of
                                          Message 20 of 28 , Dec 28, 2011
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                                            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter" <pvanderwaart@...> wrote:
                                            > I was surprised to read the recommendations for fairly heavy and
                                            powerful OBs. I used a 5hp in my 2250lb Capri 22, and it was more than
                                            enough power for just about any situation. However, they may have been
                                            thinking of powering for longer times and distances, and wanted to run
                                            at a lower throttle setting.

                                            The discussion was originally whether a Micro Navigator had the
                                            capability to cross the Atlantic. No for a Micro. Perhaps - if properly
                                            equiped - for a Long Micro Navigator. So the higher pilot house may have
                                            also been a factor.

                                            That was probably about 8 years ago or more that those recommendations
                                            were given. I think at that time the 9.9 Yamahas were the only ones that
                                            offered a high-thrust prop as well as a fairly good alternator, so those
                                            two factors were considered also I am quite certain. PCB&F were very
                                            impressed with that OB. Now HT props as after market items are available
                                            for many outboards as well as alternators although on the smaller motors
                                            they are still pretty wimpy.

                                            I also read a lengthy thread at WB group that the 6 HP Tohatsu's actual
                                            power is not noticeably different than a 4 horse 2 stroke. As |Mr.
                                            Bolger said - and I paraphrase - The horses don't seem to be as big as
                                            they used to be.

                                            Nels
                                          • loosemoosefilmworks
                                            On Micros and HP... We sailed our Micro in the English Channel with it s big tides and suchlike with a 2.2HP motor and we never found we wanted more power.
                                            Message 21 of 28 , Dec 28, 2011
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                                              On Micros and HP... We sailed our Micro in the English Channel with it's big tides and suchlike with a 2.2HP motor and we never found we wanted more power. Truth be told I resented the amount of weigt the 2.2 took up wiht it's gas.

                                              By the way we have driven our CAL 34 with a Tohatsu two stroke 5HP quite happily so 5HP has more than enough oomph for a Micro (well unless you want to take someone water skiing).

                                              Bob
                                              http://boatbits.blogspot.com/
                                              http://fishingundersail.blogspot.com/
                                              http://islandgourmand.blogspot.com/
                                            • Susanne@comcast.net
                                              Have a good New Year. I appreciate all of your support; even Grover is quiet now... Read this to get up to speed. I ll post an image (or a lot) of the
                                              Message 22 of 28 , Dec 29, 2011
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                                                Have a good New Year.  I appreciate all of your support; even 'Grover' is quiet now...
                                                Read this to get up to speed.  I'll post an image (or a lot) of the project later.  For now I have my hands full with the mess discussed below.  The Note below was addressed minutes ago to some of City-Councilors.  So you'll get to jump right into the middle of 'everything'.  A long-ish read for a winter night.  For those who get MAIB on this, this will add the latest developments...

                                                More to come in general.
                                                Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
                                                ---------
                                                "
                                                Good morning Councilors.

                                                I could use your help.  Time is of the essence.  This is one of those emergencies that you face so often...|
                                                 
                                                Please do read this introductory Note and scan the Paper below.   Note the continuing support by the Navy, and now with man-power tasked to help complete the project by Paul Diodati of the State's Division of Martine Fisheries, the premier marine-biological agency and eventual owner of the craft. 

                                                With the project being pushed off the rails once more, here is my position-paper on the genesis and current status of the Project.  Since this is a publicly-funded endeavor I am compelled to formulate this as a matter of basic accounting to the stake-holders. 
                                                     A slightly shorter version was sent Wednesday Dec. 28th 2011 to Gloucester Maritime Heritage Center/Gloucester Maritime's new Exec. Dir. Tom Balf. 
                                                     For technical context, I attach a 'Hand-Out' (Mid-Fall status) on the Project as a .pdf, plus an image of her current state of completion as of Dec. 26th 2011.

                                                To introduce the immediate challenge I will use the format I just wrote in to Tim Riley of ACTION Inc (a patron of GMHC/GM via the COMPASS-program) who visited the Project yesterday.  This jumps right into the heart of the problem.  The 'Paper' below this Note gives all the relevant details. 
                                                This will be a 10-min read:

                                                "To reiterate what we discussed yesterday during your impromptu visit to the Boat Shop, neither the COMPASS program nor any other educational initiative saw any integration of this unusual eco-project (full of STEM, Science, Technology, Engineering, Math 'meat') into their curriculum.  Since the project had been agreed by April 2010 to be hosted at GMHC/GM, with its actual start in early March 2011, there was ample lead-time to explore and maximize its inherent educational potential in different formats to match different age-groups and respective needs.  From visual in a class-room to tactile on the shop-floor and in the emerging boat, a broad range of educational angles, incl. voc.tech., have been and continue to be possible.  

                                                This failure can be explained by the combination of Exec. Dir. Harriet Webster's diagnosis by late March '11 with cancer and her struggle for survival until her death 3 months later, and Education Director Mary-Kay Taylor's incapacity/unwillingness (?) to fulfill her responsibilities around this project.  Mary-Kay Taylor (no relations to GMHC-sponsor William Taylor) is now the primary agent pushing aggressively to eject the project from 'her' Boat Shop. 

                                                A peculiar mantra of 'dead-line' setting has emerged, much-quoted to me and yet thoroughly unrelated to the circumstances of building such a craft with any inexperienced crew, never mind the challenging cases this project was saddled with, as outlined below.  Instead of the pointless attempts to dictate 'final' completion-dates, the more productive approach would have been - and remains ! -  what Harriet and I agreed on to begin with, which was to make the most of its limited-time presence at GMHC/GM as a strong educational opportunity, with solid subsequent rewards for that mission mid-term once this effort was/is successfully concluded with a public Launching Ceremony, presentations and thus the vastly-enhanced likelihood to attract more such projects based on this collaborative effort.   

                                                Going the wrong way however, this is quite a destructive spectacle, damaging not just my project and thus income, but on a much larger scale is stunningly illogical and devastating to the hopes of bringing 'smart' initiatives - such as this - to Gloucester to build momentum towards 'Green-Collar' jobs-creation of a type that can not be readily 'outsourced'.  Building low-carbon sustainability-based design for working purposes and pleasure use is one very obvious strong focus for a Port-City such as Gloucester, with respective properties fully-zoned to establish such an industry upon.  (Note the proposal for I4-C2)  

                                                As you saw the physical manifestation of yesterday, this has already proven to be a solid example of creative 'can-do', including the smooth integration of Federal-, State, and City-funding to distribute the fiscal load and risks with this experimental project.  But this push by one myopic individual (Ed. Dir. M.K.Taylor) to throw out the project into the winter not only stops any physical work on it until deep into Spring and steady 50+-degrees weather to allow epoxy- and paint-work.  It damages all of our efforts to make positive, 'good' headlines to put Gloucester into a better light, than its depiction across recent negative episodes.

                                                I hope for your support to keep this project inside to be completed by me and the State-tasked manpower (see below).  
                                                The current plan is for Jeffrey Richon to use his crane to pull her out by Friday morning Dec. 30 2011.
                                                     If he is dead-set in this destructive approach, I would need to find heated space measuring 50'x15' to complete the work.  Alas, the budget was expended months ago (see below).  
                                                Mid-Winter launching of her is technically perfectly doable, as long as there is no ice at the launching-ramp.  The State's DMF-biologists have work to do year-round (see below as well). 

                                                Finally, she needs to be finished for me to receive my final payment of a flat-fee set for the expected 4-5 month part-time supervisory role - versus my now full-time April-to-December+ investment.

                                                Thank you for taking the time to view the craft yesterday.
                                                      Yours sincerely
                                                Susanne Altenburger
                                                Phil Bolger & Friends Inc.
                                                66 Atlantic Street
                                                Gloucester MA 01930-1627

                                                -----------

                                                Building a Navy Patrol-Boat / State Marine-Biological Research Craft at GMHC 
                                                Project-Status as of Dec. 28th 2011

                                                A.  Project Basics (see attached .pdf):
                                                1.  The Boat-Building Project will serve as a limited-time experimental type for the Navy to confirm or reject its viability for their particular political and tactical purposes.

                                                2.  The craft will then become the latest and 'greenest' marine-biological research craft for use by the Commonwealth's of Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF), its leading marine biological research agency, with its Director Paul Diodati now just elected as the Chief of all such East-Coast agencies for a two-year term 2011-2013.

                                                3.
                                                  The Project was brought to GMHC (now GM) by Exec. Dir. Harriet Webster and myself, Susanne Altenburger of Phil Bolger &Friends Inc (PB&F), in light of its match with both the organization's
                                                a.) marine-industrial mission as America's oldest continuously operating shipyard,  and its
                                                b.) marine-biological educational program.
                                                We both embraced this collaboration because of its inherent and obvious potency as an educational and public-relations tool in support of the Center and the Working Waterfront.  

                                                While various funding-sources were successfully choreographed, the only serious uncertainty was the expected total man-hours it would take to complete the Project.  As the subsequent saga of of good and bad crew-behavior has documented  this concern would be confirmed as a major challenge.  All three members were recommended either by Jeffrey Richon or from within GMHC. 
                                                To recollect, 
                                                - Foreman Jose Leland's apparently indulged in drug-use before work on weekdays, as documented by his arrest one April Wednesday morning for Driving Under the Influence and Possession With Intent to Distribute, with his work-ethic spotty from good over indifferent to damaging, to finally see him walk off the job when held accountable for a series of expensive mistakes;
                                                Matt Cooney was never able to show up on time (except for once), typically exhibited unwillingness to wear eye, ear and breathing protection, was unwilling/unable(?) to learn from repeated mistakes, and came to express a very poor opinion on this Project and the design, upon which he was fired by me.  Both Richon and Leland expressed their strong disagreement with my decision as a Project-Manager (?!).  
                                                - Sarah Tuvim was able to do decent work, but never to the schedule dictated by the budget and timeline, and was eventually eased out.
                                                With 3 out of 3 folks not performing as necessary, the much reduced rate of progress was unavoidable.
                                                - My hiring of Rosalyn Frontiera proved a good move with her consistent performance as the longest-serving productive crew-member across many month, and even now offering periodically up to full days of volunteer work.
                                                - In terms of my own effort on the shop-floor, intended by contract to just supervise the Project part-time, I went from 5 days per week by April, to 6-days Summer and Fall, with the last month seeing 7-days work-weeks.
                                                 
                                                4.  The Project is built of 90% sustainably-sourced materials - US farm-grown Douglas Fir marine-grade plywood -, with the remaining approx. 10% based on fossil fuel, used here to enhance the wood's strength and life-expectancy.  This approach contrasts with the typically 100% synthetic/man-made and often high-carbon approach for all-fiberglass-, steel- or aluminum-construction.  
                                                     The US-Navy is very familiar with modern wood-composite construction, operating a fleet of 12 1400+tons heavy wood-composite Minesweepers, built in the late 80-and 90s.  Fully-loaded this craft here will weigh in around 4 tons.  

                                                5.  The boat, as it has emerged throughout much of this year in full public view on the Boat Shop's floor, is a demonstration of an advanced way to design and build Lower-Carbon craft, explicitly initiated by the Navy to be built this way, and supported fiscally and now also with a growing number of 'man-days' by DMF staff coming in to help with two+-handed jobs to conclude to project more rapidly.  Both agencies continue to support the project.


                                                B.  Project position within GMHC/GM:
                                                1.
                                                  Beyond initial collaborative efforts between GMHC/GM under Webster and PB&F under Altenburger, GMHC/GM had to devote only very limited resources to attract and retain the Project.  In return it received one major attraction to its range of exhibits with this largest-yet boat-construction effort in its Boat-Shop with its final purpose to serve as a marine-biological research-platform for the State.

                                                2.
                                                  The Project began in early March 2011 with Harriet Webster falling ill in March as well, to then pass away in June.   Despite well-documented challenges with the initial building crew, Altenburger continued the project, eventually even single-handed much of the time to its current near-completed status.

                                                3.  As of late-December all structural work is done on the Project, with most painting completed, with only the aft-cockpit remaining to be assembled out of mostly already pre-fabricated and pre-painted panels.  Glass is ready to be installed to make her weather-tight, with the motor on hand.  Electrical and minor mechanical system can be completed outside of the shop.  The State via DMF is willing to continue its tasking of manpower in support of this Project to complete it as soon as possible.

                                                4.  Agreed by all stake-holders in April 2010 to be brought to GMHC, over 11-month of lead-time was available for the educational staff to integrate this 'Signature Project' into its curriculum.  Altenburger stood ready to share information, drawings, possibly even connections with the stake-holders on the State and Federal levels, such as Marine-Biologists.  

                                                5.  Approached again this summer by Altenburger on this issue,  Mary-Kay Taylor (Director of Education) did refuse again to make this emerging marine-biology research-craft part of the offerings for the children and youth brought to the Center.  While the public had full access to come into the shop to study the Project, ask questions, touch the craft and watched work on it, no scheduled integration for school-children and adolescents was initiated to share this rare opportunity with the clients (and their parents, teachers, administrators) the organization is drawing much of its budget from.   While over 1150 visitors were personally welcomed and responded to on the Boat Shop floor, no educational sessions were held there, with minor (accidental) exceptions when I pulled in an Instructor, such as from the Merrimack Valley Educational consortium, or a driver such as a school from Marlborough, and schooner- and Outward-Bound crews.  No organized dedicated integration of this project was pursued. 
                                                    
                                                6.  Instead, this Project of building right on site of an Advanced Marine-Biological Research Craft to high sustainability-coefficiency for the State's prime marine-biological agency (DMF) has been perceived by Mary Kay as a hindrance to her professional interests, literally described by her as a large physical obstacle to her particular definition of the organization's educational mission.  Her perspective and actions suggest that this Project was and remains is an unwelcome intrusion without any educational value to merit focus on.  Hence her push towards this Project's expulsion from the Boat Shop. 

                                                7.  Meanwhile, DMF-staffers on the shop-floor have so far included
                                                - the gear-specialists in charge of maintaining and even developing DMF's range of research-assets, both land-bound and sea-going;
                                                - Marine-Biologists who have begun to integrate the emerging craft into their vision for the work in 2012, such as for instance Eel-Grass Research, incl. diving-operations;
                                                - Liaison-officer connecting Federal funding to the State's agencies;
                                                - the agency's Director himself, Paul Diodati, with a strong personal interest as the Chief of the State's marine-biological research.

                                                8.
                                                  Other elected and appointed visitors include,
                                                - Mayor Kirk,
                                                - Congressman John Tierney,
                                                - the US Navy delegation who visited several times already, incl. their testing staff,
                                                - State Senator Bruce Tarr,
                                                - staffers from Senators Kerry's and Brown's offices,
                                                - the head of the Mass. Cultural Council,
                                                - City Councilors Hardy, Tobey and McGeary,
                                                - the head of the city's Fisheries Commission, David Bergeron,
                                                - Coast Guard officers,
                                                - State Environmental Police officers,
                                                - City police officers,
                                                etc...    
                                                  
                                                9.  GMHC/GM's education staffers did not seek to cultivate relations with either DMF-chief Diodati, nor his biologists, gear-specialists, administrators etc.  nor the members of our political leadership in connection to this Project.  Instead a great sense of growing aggravation has been expressed as to the longer-than-expected presence of the craft and all these visitors and State and Federal stake-holders.  Complaints have been issued again and again how the Project jeopardizes the educational mission of GMHC/GM.  No understanding of its potent value has been demonstrated in words or deeds. 

                                                10.  Explicitly embraced by the late Harriet Webster because of its obvious and explicit and now proven Multiplier Potential - with for instance the State's major marine-biological players attracted to the Project and thus GMHC/GM  - this Project manifests one already successful model of partnership across multiple levels of government and private for-profit and non-profit entities.   Webster and Altenburger forged this relationship in hopes of building upon it.   
                                                    
                                                Myopia was explicitly rejected, with a large-aperture optic understood to be the key to make this Project successful and set one more potent precedent to grow both GMHC/GM's capabilities and the viability of Gloucester Marine-Industrial and Marine-Scientific prospects by integrating them in this particular Project.  


                                                C.  Project Outlook:
                                                1.
                                                  The Navy continues its support for the Project, and the State has recently increased its initial investment by tasking man-power towards rapid completion of the Project.

                                                2.  The Project's completion depends upon 50+ degrees F ambient temperature to allow epoxy and paint to cure.

                                                3.  The Project retains its potency to serve as a rare and temporary (!) educational tool teaching aspects of
                                                - design,
                                                - sustainable materials,
                                                - the role of advanced chemistry to support sustainability,
                                                - using your hands to build this larger structure that will work for science on the water ,
                                                - demonstrating the science, technologies, and associated trades it is based on,
                                                - the chance to possibly be aboard her while she works.

                                                4.  In terms of Boat-Shop use:
                                                - the Project's longer-than-expected presence on the shop-floor does not break new ground with other projects with one measuring 32feet x5'6" (vs. this Project's 39'x7'6) present for up to two years;
                                                - it has added no additional or more dangerous chemicals to both the shop's documented stock, and history of prior uses;
                                                - it has been compressed in its total foot-print to less than half the shop's floor-plan and work-bench surfaces;
                                                scheduling co-use of the Boat Shop has been practiced successfully in the past, and has offered repeatedly here as well, incl. the careful timing of painting session not before class-room use etc;
                                                - the Project is close to completion, with Altenburger and DMF having presented an unambiguous track-record of pushing hard to finish it.

                                                5.  Ejecting the Project from the Boat Shop at this time will
                                                - sever the relationship with PB&F,
                                                - likely dims prospects for GM's relationship with DMF and related Federal agencies,
                                                - signals to associated schools and organizations (GMHC/GM's client-base) a troubling incoherence of vision and thus inconsistency of curricular offerings to the students, 
                                                - will terminate any remaining chance for your clients (students, parents, teachers, administrators) to study and learn from this rare collaborative Project, or even be part of it in some way.
                                                - will signal to current and potential funders how myopia of a very few (Mary-Kay Taylor et. al.) led GMHC/GM to reject this Project's rich range of educational and funding opportunities along with its inherent professional relationships deep into the State's marine-biological establishment, typically deemed essential to affiliated individuals and institution. 

                                                                                                  --------------------------------------------------------

                                                This perspective by Susanne Altenburger of Phil Bolger & Friends, and Project-Manager for the publicly-funded SACPAS-3 Project will serve to explain the situation to all stake-holders and other interest parties.

                                                ----- Original Message -----
                                                Sent: Wednesday, December 28, 2011 3:21 PM
                                                Subject: [bolger] Re: Micro Construction

                                                 


                                                On Micros and HP... We sailed our Micro in the English Channel with it's big tides and suchlike with a 2.2HP motor and we never found we wanted more power. Truth be told I resented the amount of weigt the 2.2 took up wiht it's gas.

                                                By the way we have driven our CAL 34 with a Tohatsu two stroke 5HP quite happily so 5HP has more than enough oomph for a Micro (well unless you want to take someone water skiing).

                                                Bob
                                                http://boatbits.blogspot.com/
                                                http://fishingundersail.blogspot.com/
                                                http://islandgourmand.blogspot.com/

                                              • Jack & Lois Bearden
                                                Thanx for replies on the speed/power ratio issue. My intention is to relaunch my Micro with the Bolger Chinese gaff rig in the Bay of Fundy next summer. I
                                                Message 23 of 28 , Dec 30, 2011
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  Thanx for replies on the speed/power ratio issue. My intention is to
                                                  relaunch my Micro with the Bolger Chinese gaff rig in the Bay of Fundy
                                                  next summer. I think I'll stick with my 2.5 Yamaha long shaft. It got me
                                                  to my mooring in Mahone Bay at half throttle against 25 nts. with no
                                                  trouble (once I quit trying to motor sail in. Closest I've ever come to
                                                  a knock down in a Micro!).

                                                  jeb, on the freezing shores of Fundy.
                                                • etap28
                                                  Suzanne, You re obviously doing everything you can possibly do to make this boat happen and from this write-up it s also obvious the kinds of
                                                  Message 24 of 28 , Dec 30, 2011
                                                  • 0 Attachment
                                                    Suzanne,
                                                    You're obviously doing everything you can possibly do to make this boat happen and from this write-up it's also obvious the kinds of personel/bureaucratic hurdles you're having to deal with. Not at all enviable. By the time it's all over, you'll either be in the loony bin, or ready to go into politics.
                                                    I'm rooting for you, and know that you'll get your contracted payment, and get it in the water, to boot! I look forward to that inevitable launch date. Keep both oars in,
                                                    Dave Irland

                                                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > Have a good New Year. I appreciate all of your support; even 'Grover' is quiet now...
                                                    > Read this to get up to speed. I'll post an image (or a lot) of the project later. For now I have my hands full with the mess discussed below. The Note below was addressed minutes ago to some of City-Councilors. So you'll get to jump right into the middle of 'everything'. A long-ish read for a winter night. For those who get MAIB on this, this will add the latest developments...
                                                    >
                                                    > More to come in general.
                                                    > Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
                                                    > ---------
                                                    >
                                                    > "
                                                    > Good morning Councilors.
                                                    >
                                                    > I could use your help. Time is of the essence. This is one of those emergencies that you face so often...|
                                                    >
                                                    > Please do read this introductory Note and scan the Paper below. Note the continuing support by the Navy, and now with man-power tasked to help complete the project by Paul Diodati of the State's Division of Martine Fisheries, the premier marine-biological agency and eventual owner of the craft.
                                                    >
                                                    > With the project being pushed off the rails once more, here is my position-paper on the genesis and current status of the Project. Since this is a publicly-funded endeavor I am compelled to formulate this as a matter of basic accounting to the stake-holders.
                                                    > A slightly shorter version was sent Wednesday Dec. 28th 2011 to Gloucester Maritime Heritage Center/Gloucester Maritime's new Exec. Dir. Tom Balf.
                                                    > For technical context, I attach a 'Hand-Out' (Mid-Fall status) on the Project as a .pdf, plus an image of her current state of completion as of Dec. 26th 2011.
                                                    >
                                                    > To introduce the immediate challenge I will use the format I just wrote in to Tim Riley of ACTION Inc (a patron of GMHC/GM via the COMPASS-program) who visited the Project yesterday. This jumps right into the heart of the problem. The 'Paper' below this Note gives all the relevant details.
                                                    > This will be a 10-min read:
                                                    >
                                                    > "To reiterate what we discussed yesterday during your impromptu visit to the Boat Shop, neither the COMPASS program nor any other educational initiative saw any integration of this unusual eco-project (full of STEM, Science, Technology, Engineering, Math 'meat') into their curriculum. Since the project had been agreed by April 2010 to be hosted at GMHC/GM, with its actual start in early March 2011, there was ample lead-time to explore and maximize its inherent educational potential in different formats to match different age-groups and respective needs. From visual in a class-room to tactile on the shop-floor and in the emerging boat, a broad range of educational angles, incl. voc.tech., have been and continue to be possible.
                                                    >
                                                    > This failure can be explained by the combination of Exec. Dir. Harriet Webster's diagnosis by late March '11 with cancer and her struggle for survival until her death 3 months later, and Education Director Mary-Kay Taylor's incapacity/unwillingness (?) to fulfill her responsibilities around this project. Mary-Kay Taylor (no relations to GMHC-sponsor William Taylor) is now the primary agent pushing aggressively to eject the project from 'her' Boat Shop.
                                                    >
                                                    > A peculiar mantra of 'dead-line' setting has emerged, much-quoted to me and yet thoroughly unrelated to the circumstances of building such a craft with any inexperienced crew, never mind the challenging cases this project was saddled with, as outlined below. Instead of the pointless attempts to dictate 'final' completion-dates, the more productive approach would have been - and remains ! - what Harriet and I agreed on to begin with, which was to make the most of its limited-time presence at GMHC/GM as a strong educational opportunity, with solid subsequent rewards for that mission mid-term once this effort was/is successfully concluded with a public Launching Ceremony, presentations and thus the vastly-enhanced likelihood to attract more such projects based on this collaborative effort.
                                                    >
                                                    > Going the wrong way however, this is quite a destructive spectacle, damaging not just my project and thus income, but on a much larger scale is stunningly illogical and devastating to the hopes of bringing 'smart' initiatives - such as this - to Gloucester to build momentum towards 'Green-Collar' jobs-creation of a type that can not be readily 'outsourced'. Building low-carbon sustainability-based design for working purposes and pleasure use is one very obvious strong focus for a Port-City such as Gloucester, with respective properties fully-zoned to establish such an industry upon. (Note the proposal for I4-C2)
                                                    >
                                                    > As you saw the physical manifestation of yesterday, this has already proven to be a solid example of creative 'can-do', including the smooth integration of Federal-, State, and City-funding to distribute the fiscal load and risks with this experimental project. But this push by one myopic individual (Ed. Dir. M.K.Taylor) to throw out the project into the winter not only stops any physical work on it until deep into Spring and steady 50+-degrees weather to allow epoxy- and paint-work. It damages all of our efforts to make positive, 'good' headlines to put Gloucester into a better light, than its depiction across recent negative episodes.
                                                    >
                                                    > I hope for your support to keep this project inside to be completed by me and the State-tasked manpower (see below).
                                                    > The current plan is for Jeffrey Richon to use his crane to pull her out by Friday morning Dec. 30 2011.
                                                    > If he is dead-set in this destructive approach, I would need to find heated space measuring 50'x15' to complete the work. Alas, the budget was expended months ago (see below).
                                                    > Mid-Winter launching of her is technically perfectly doable, as long as there is no ice at the launching-ramp. The State's DMF-biologists have work to do year-round (see below as well).
                                                    >
                                                    > Finally, she needs to be finished for me to receive my final payment of a flat-fee set for the expected 4-5 month part-time supervisory role - versus my now full-time April-to-December+ investment.
                                                    >
                                                    > Thank you for taking the time to view the craft yesterday.
                                                    > Yours sincerely
                                                    > Susanne Altenburger
                                                    > Phil Bolger & Friends Inc.
                                                    > 66 Atlantic Street
                                                    > Gloucester MA 01930-1627
                                                    >
                                                    > -----------
                                                    >
                                                    > Building a Navy Patrol-Boat / State Marine-Biological Research Craft at GMHC
                                                    > Project-Status as of Dec. 28th 2011
                                                    >
                                                    > A. Project Basics (see attached .pdf):
                                                    > 1. The Boat-Building Project will serve as a limited-time experimental type for the Navy to confirm or reject its viability for their particular political and tactical purposes.
                                                    >
                                                    > 2. The craft will then become the latest and 'greenest' marine-biological research craft for use by the Commonwealth's of Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF), its leading marine biological research agency, with its Director Paul Diodati now just elected as the Chief of all such East-Coast agencies for a two-year term 2011-2013.
                                                    >
                                                    > 3. The Project was brought to GMHC (now GM) by Exec. Dir. Harriet Webster and myself, Susanne Altenburger of Phil Bolger &Friends Inc (PB&F), in light of its match with both the organization's
                                                    > a.) marine-industrial mission as America's oldest continuously operating shipyard, and its
                                                    > b.) marine-biological educational program.
                                                    > We both embraced this collaboration because of its inherent and obvious potency as an educational and public-relations tool in support of the Center and the Working Waterfront.
                                                    >
                                                    > While various funding-sources were successfully choreographed, the only serious uncertainty was the expected total man-hours it would take to complete the Project. As the subsequent saga of of good and bad crew-behavior has documented this concern would be confirmed as a major challenge. All three members were recommended either by Jeffrey Richon or from within GMHC.
                                                    > To recollect,
                                                    > - Foreman Jose Leland's apparently indulged in drug-use before work on weekdays, as documented by his arrest one April Wednesday morning for Driving Under the Influence and Possession With Intent to Distribute, with his work-ethic spotty from good over indifferent to damaging, to finally see him walk off the job when held accountable for a series of expensive mistakes;
                                                    > - Matt Cooney was never able to show up on time (except for once), typically exhibited unwillingness to wear eye, ear and breathing protection, was unwilling/unable(?) to learn from repeated mistakes, and came to express a very poor opinion on this Project and the design, upon which he was fired by me. Both Richon and Leland expressed their strong disagreement with my decision as a Project-Manager (?!).
                                                    > - Sarah Tuvim was able to do decent work, but never to the schedule dictated by the budget and timeline, and was eventually eased out.
                                                    > With 3 out of 3 folks not performing as necessary, the much reduced rate of progress was unavoidable.
                                                    > - My hiring of Rosalyn Frontiera proved a good move with her consistent performance as the longest-serving productive crew-member across many month, and even now offering periodically up to full days of volunteer work.
                                                    > - In terms of my own effort on the shop-floor, intended by contract to just supervise the Project part-time, I went from 5 days per week by April, to 6-days Summer and Fall, with the last month seeing 7-days work-weeks.
                                                    >
                                                    > 4. The Project is built of 90% sustainably-sourced materials - US farm-grown Douglas Fir marine-grade plywood -, with the remaining approx. 10% based on fossil fuel, used here to enhance the wood's strength and life-expectancy. This approach contrasts with the typically 100% synthetic/man-made and often high-carbon approach for all-fiberglass-, steel- or aluminum-construction.
                                                    > The US-Navy is very familiar with modern wood-composite construction, operating a fleet of 12 1400+tons heavy wood-composite Minesweepers, built in the late 80-and 90s. Fully-loaded this craft here will weigh in around 4 tons.
                                                    >
                                                    > 5. The boat, as it has emerged throughout much of this year in full public view on the Boat Shop's floor, is a demonstration of an advanced way to design and build Lower-Carbon craft, explicitly initiated by the Navy to be built this way, and supported fiscally and now also with a growing number of 'man-days' by DMF staff coming in to help with two+-handed jobs to conclude to project more rapidly. Both agencies continue to support the project.
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > B. Project position within GMHC/GM:
                                                    > 1. Beyond initial collaborative efforts between GMHC/GM under Webster and PB&F under Altenburger, GMHC/GM had to devote only very limited resources to attract and retain the Project. In return it received one major attraction to its range of exhibits with this largest-yet boat-construction effort in its Boat-Shop with its final purpose to serve as a marine-biological research-platform for the State.
                                                    >
                                                    > 2. The Project began in early March 2011 with Harriet Webster falling ill in March as well, to then pass away in June. Despite well-documented challenges with the initial building crew, Altenburger continued the project, eventually even single-handed much of the time to its current near-completed status.
                                                    >
                                                    > 3. As of late-December all structural work is done on the Project, with most painting completed, with only the aft-cockpit remaining to be assembled out of mostly already pre-fabricated and pre-painted panels. Glass is ready to be installed to make her weather-tight, with the motor on hand. Electrical and minor mechanical system can be completed outside of the shop. The State via DMF is willing to continue its tasking of manpower in support of this Project to complete it as soon as possible.
                                                    >
                                                    > 4. Agreed by all stake-holders in April 2010 to be brought to GMHC, over 11-month of lead-time was available for the educational staff to integrate this 'Signature Project' into its curriculum. Altenburger stood ready to share information, drawings, possibly even connections with the stake-holders on the State and Federal levels, such as Marine-Biologists.
                                                    >
                                                    > 5. Approached again this summer by Altenburger on this issue, Mary-Kay Taylor (Director of Education) did refuse again to make this emerging marine-biology research-craft part of the offerings for the children and youth brought to the Center. While the public had full access to come into the shop to study the Project, ask questions, touch the craft and watched work on it, no scheduled integration for school-children and adolescents was initiated to share this rare opportunity with the clients (and their parents, teachers, administrators) the organization is drawing much of its budget from. While over 1150 visitors were personally welcomed and responded to on the Boat Shop floor, no educational sessions were held there, with minor (accidental) exceptions when I pulled in an Instructor, such as from the Merrimack Valley Educational consortium, or a driver such as a school from Marlborough, and schooner- and Outward-Bound crews. No organized dedicated integration of this project was pursued.
                                                    >
                                                    > 6. Instead, this Project of building right on site of an Advanced Marine-Biological Research Craft to high sustainability-coefficiency for the State's prime marine-biological agency (DMF) has been perceived by Mary Kay as a hindrance to her professional interests, literally described by her as a large physical obstacle to her particular definition of the organization's educational mission. Her perspective and actions suggest that this Project was and remains is an unwelcome intrusion without any educational value to merit focus on. Hence her push towards this Project's expulsion from the Boat Shop.
                                                    >
                                                    > 7. Meanwhile, DMF-staffers on the shop-floor have so far included
                                                    > - the gear-specialists in charge of maintaining and even developing DMF's range of research-assets, both land-bound and sea-going;
                                                    > - Marine-Biologists who have begun to integrate the emerging craft into their vision for the work in 2012, such as for instance Eel-Grass Research, incl. diving-operations;
                                                    > - Liaison-officer connecting Federal funding to the State's agencies;
                                                    > - the agency's Director himself, Paul Diodati, with a strong personal interest as the Chief of the State's marine-biological research.
                                                    >
                                                    > 8. Other elected and appointed visitors include,
                                                    > - Mayor Kirk,
                                                    > - Congressman John Tierney,
                                                    > - the US Navy delegation who visited several times already, incl. their testing staff,
                                                    > - State Senator Bruce Tarr,
                                                    > - staffers from Senators Kerry's and Brown's offices,
                                                    > - the head of the Mass. Cultural Council,
                                                    > - City Councilors Hardy, Tobey and McGeary,
                                                    > - the head of the city's Fisheries Commission, David Bergeron,
                                                    > - Coast Guard officers,
                                                    > - State Environmental Police officers,
                                                    > - City police officers,
                                                    > etc...
                                                    >
                                                    > 9. GMHC/GM's education staffers did not seek to cultivate relations with either DMF-chief Diodati, nor his biologists, gear-specialists, administrators etc. nor the members of our political leadership in connection to this Project. Instead a great sense of growing aggravation has been expressed as to the longer-than-expected presence of the craft and all these visitors and State and Federal stake-holders. Complaints have been issued again and again how the Project jeopardizes the educational mission of GMHC/GM. No understanding of its potent value has been demonstrated in words or deeds.
                                                    >
                                                    > 10. Explicitly embraced by the late Harriet Webster because of its obvious and explicit and now proven Multiplier Potential - with for instance the State's major marine-biological players attracted to the Project and thus GMHC/GM - this Project manifests one already successful model of partnership across multiple levels of government and private for-profit and non-profit entities. Webster and Altenburger forged this relationship in hopes of building upon it.
                                                    > Myopia was explicitly rejected, with a large-aperture optic understood to be the key to make this Project successful and set one more potent precedent to grow both GMHC/GM's capabilities and the viability of Gloucester Marine-Industrial and Marine-Scientific prospects by integrating them in this particular Project.
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > C. Project Outlook:
                                                    > 1. The Navy continues its support for the Project, and the State has recently increased its initial investment by tasking man-power towards rapid completion of the Project.
                                                    >
                                                    > 2. The Project's completion depends upon 50+ degrees F ambient temperature to allow epoxy and paint to cure.
                                                    >
                                                    > 3. The Project retains its potency to serve as a rare and temporary (!) educational tool teaching aspects of
                                                    > - design,
                                                    > - sustainable materials,
                                                    > - the role of advanced chemistry to support sustainability,
                                                    > - using your hands to build this larger structure that will work for science on the water ,
                                                    > - demonstrating the science, technologies, and associated trades it is based on,
                                                    > - the chance to possibly be aboard her while she works.
                                                    >
                                                    > 4. In terms of Boat-Shop use:
                                                    > - the Project's longer-than-expected presence on the shop-floor does not break new ground with other projects with one measuring 32feet x5'6" (vs. this Project's 39'x7'6) present for up to two years;
                                                    > - it has added no additional or more dangerous chemicals to both the shop's documented stock, and history of prior uses;
                                                    > - it has been compressed in its total foot-print to less than half the shop's floor-plan and work-bench surfaces;
                                                    > - scheduling co-use of the Boat Shop has been practiced successfully in the past, and has offered repeatedly here as well, incl. the careful timing of painting session not before class-room use etc;
                                                    > - the Project is close to completion, with Altenburger and DMF having presented an unambiguous track-record of pushing hard to finish it.
                                                    >
                                                    > 5. Ejecting the Project from the Boat Shop at this time will
                                                    > - sever the relationship with PB&F,
                                                    > - likely dims prospects for GM's relationship with DMF and related Federal agencies,
                                                    > - signals to associated schools and organizations (GMHC/GM's client-base) a troubling incoherence of vision and thus inconsistency of curricular offerings to the students,
                                                    > - will terminate any remaining chance for your clients (students, parents, teachers, administrators) to study and learn from this rare collaborative Project, or even be part of it in some way.
                                                    > - will signal to current and potential funders how myopia of a very few (Mary-Kay Taylor et. al.) led GMHC/GM to reject this Project's rich range of educational and funding opportunities along with its inherent professional relationships deep into the State's marine-biological establishment, typically deemed essential to affiliated individuals and institution.
                                                    >
                                                    > --------------------------------------------------------
                                                    >
                                                    > This perspective by Susanne Altenburger of Phil Bolger & Friends, and Project-Manager for the publicly-funded SACPAS-3 Project will serve to explain the situation to all stake-holders and other interest parties.
                                                    >
                                                    > ----- Original Message -----
                                                    > From: loosemoosefilmworks
                                                    > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                                    > Sent: Wednesday, December 28, 2011 3:21 PM
                                                    > Subject: [bolger] Re: Micro Construction
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > On Micros and HP... We sailed our Micro in the English Channel with it's big tides and suchlike with a 2.2HP motor and we never found we wanted more power. Truth be told I resented the amount of weigt the 2.2 took up wiht it's gas.
                                                    >
                                                    > By the way we have driven our CAL 34 with a Tohatsu two stroke 5HP quite happily so 5HP has more than enough oomph for a Micro (well unless you want to take someone water skiing).
                                                    >
                                                    > Bob
                                                    > http://boatbits.blogspot.com/
                                                    > http://fishingundersail.blogspot.com/
                                                    > http://islandgourmand.blogspot.com/
                                                    >
                                                  • dnjost
                                                    While cutting up the skiff I thought a lot about Susanne s posting today and felt a great deal on empathy for her situation in dealing with manpower , STEM
                                                    Message 25 of 28 , Dec 31, 2011
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                                                      While cutting up the skiff I thought a lot about Susanne's posting today and felt a great deal on empathy for her situation in dealing with "manpower", "STEM curriculum (lets make that STEAM with a strong infusion of ARTS), charitable organizations, and dealing with unfunded myopic mandates. I am glad that the DEM and Navy still have support for the project, hopefully they will assist with finding resources and space.

                                                      I wish I had a 50' heated boat shed to donate, alas my garage is only 20' long and 10' wide.

                                                      Best wishes for a successful conclusion. Perhaps a good old fashioned barn raising (read that "cooperative boat build") is in order. Could we round up enough skilled volunteers to get this done?

                                                      David Jost
                                                    • RSS
                                                      Nice to see the pics. A good looking boat! It looks like you have about the same crowded working conditions as I do. When I built my Bantam I lengthened it to
                                                      Message 26 of 28 , Jan 1, 2012
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                                                        Nice to see the pics. A good looking boat! It looks like you have about the same crowded working conditions as I do. When I built my Bantam I lengthened it to 22' and that is the max I can build in a 24' garage :)
                                                        I just wanted to comment that the pointy skiff made from luuan under layment. The luuan back then was pretty good stuff. I used it in many boat building projects. The stuff they are selling today, at least in my neck of the woods, is junk. The middle plys are some kind of white wood and the stuff breaks easily and the pile is so warped the stuff just does not invite confidence, so now have to switch to some other kind of plywood. I wish Noah's supply was close to my home. They sell great Meranti ply at really good prices. If building a big boat it's cost effective to have it trucked. If you need two sheets of 1/4 inch to build a small skiff it's not. For small stuff I may try the 1/4 Accuply sold here at Menards. It says it is doesn't have voids and uses waterproof glue. It's pine so have the grain problem if not fiberglassed. Cost $18.00 a sheet in 1/4". Has anyone used this stuff?
                                                        The downside to Susanne's trouble is she will likely learn to never get involved in such a thing again. That's how we all end up losing faith in such endeavors and how just one person who wants to prove his/her power can ruin things for the many. Even at such a low level it's still politics, and politics suck! I too hope they find a way to finish the project. I want to read and see the photos of it finished and launched in MAIBs!
                                                        Bob
                                                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "dnjost" <davidjost@...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > While cutting up the skiff I thought a lot about Susanne's posting today and felt a great deal on empathy for her situation in dealing with "manpower", "STEM curriculum (lets make that STEAM with a strong infusion of ARTS), charitable organizations, and dealing with unfunded myopic mandates. I am glad that the DEM and Navy still have support for the project, hopefully they will assist with finding resources and space.
                                                        >
                                                        > I wish I had a 50' heated boat shed to donate, alas my garage is only 20' long and 10' wide.
                                                        >
                                                        > Best wishes for a successful conclusion. Perhaps a good old fashioned barn raising (read that "cooperative boat build") is in order. Could we round up enough skilled volunteers to get this done?
                                                        >
                                                        > David Jost
                                                        >
                                                      • Susanne@comcast.net
                                                        An up-date: The project was moved out uneventfully on Friday the 30th 11. By Thursday, Jan. 5th she arrived alongside RESOLUTION, to nestle there for the next
                                                        Message 27 of 28 , Jan 9, 2012
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                                                          An up-date:
                                                              The project was moved out uneventfully on Friday the 30th '11.
                                                          By Thursday, Jan. 5th she arrived alongside RESOLUTION, to nestle there for the next few...
                                                          Onwards and upwards.

                                                          I'll try to get photos uploaded... 
                                                          Susanne
                                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                                          Sent: Thursday, December 29, 2011 9:07 AM
                                                          Subject: [bolger] Signs of Life - News from Gloucester

                                                           

                                                          Have a good New Year.  I appreciate all of your support; even 'Grover' is quiet now...
                                                          Read this to get up to speed.  I'll post an image (or a lot) of the project later.  For now I have my hands full with the mess discussed below.  The Note below was addressed minutes ago to some of City-Councilors.  So you'll get to jump right into the middle of 'everything'.  A long-ish read for a winter night.  For those who get MAIB on this, this will add the latest developments...

                                                          More to come in general.
                                                          Susanne Altenburger, PB&F
                                                          ---------
                                                          "
                                                          Good morning Councilors.

                                                          I could use your help.  Time is of the essence.  This is one of those emergencies that you face so often...|
                                                           
                                                          Please do read this introductory Note and scan the Paper below.   Note the continuing support by the Navy, and now with man-power tasked to help complete the project by Paul Diodati of the State's Division of Martine Fisheries, the premier marine-biological agency and eventual owner of the craft. 

                                                          With the project being pushed off the rails once more, here is my position-paper on the genesis and current status of the Project.  Since this is a publicly-funded endeavor I am compelled to formulate this as a matter of basic accounting to the stake-holders. 
                                                               A slightly shorter version was sent Wednesday Dec. 28th 2011 to Gloucester Maritime Heritage Center/Gloucester Maritime's new Exec. Dir. Tom Balf. 
                                                               For technical context, I attach a 'Hand-Out' (Mid-Fall status) on the Project as a .pdf, plus an image of her current state of completion as of Dec. 26th 2011.

                                                          To introduce the immediate challenge I will use the format I just wrote in to Tim Riley of ACTION Inc (a patron of GMHC/GM via the COMPASS-program) who visited the Project yesterday.  This jumps right into the heart of the problem.  The 'Paper' below this Note gives all the relevant details. 
                                                          This will be a 10-min read:

                                                          "To reiterate what we discussed yesterday during your impromptu visit to the Boat Shop, neither the COMPASS program nor any other educational initiative saw any integration of this unusual eco-project (full of STEM, Science, Technology, Engineering, Math 'meat') into their curriculum.  Since the project had been agreed by April 2010 to be hosted at GMHC/GM, with its actual start in early March 2011, there was ample lead-time to explore and maximize its inherent educational potential in different formats to match different age-groups and respective needs.  From visual in a class-room to tactile on the shop-floor and in the emerging boat, a broad range of educational angles, incl. voc.tech., have been and continue to be possible.  

                                                          This failure can be explained by the combination of Exec. Dir. Harriet Webster's diagnosis by late March '11 with cancer and her struggle for survival until her death 3 months later, and Education Director Mary-Kay Taylor's incapacity/unwillingness (?) to fulfill her responsibilities around this project.  Mary-Kay Taylor (no relations to GMHC-sponsor William Taylor) is now the primary agent pushing aggressively to eject the project from 'her' Boat Shop. 

                                                          A peculiar mantra of 'dead-line' setting has emerged, much-quoted to me and yet thoroughly unrelated to the circumstances of building such a craft with any inexperienced crew, never mind the challenging cases this project was saddled with, as outlined below.  Instead of the pointless attempts to dictate 'final' completion-dates, the more productive approach would have been - and remains ! -  what Harriet and I agreed on to begin with, which was to make the most of its limited-time presence at GMHC/GM as a strong educational opportunity, with solid subsequent rewards for that mission mid-term once this effort was/is successfully concluded with a public Launching Ceremony, presentations and thus the vastly-enhanced likelihood to attract more such projects based on this collaborative effort.   

                                                          Going the wrong way however, this is quite a destructive spectacle, damaging not just my project and thus income, but on a much larger scale is stunningly illogical and devastating to the hopes of bringing 'smart' initiatives - such as this - to Gloucester to build momentum towards 'Green-Collar' jobs-creation of a type that can not be readily 'outsourced'.  Building low-carbon sustainability-based design for working purposes and pleasure use is one very obvious strong focus for a Port-City such as Gloucester, with respective properties fully-zoned to establish such an industry upon.  (Note the proposal for I4-C2)  

                                                          As you saw the physical manifestation of yesterday, this has already proven to be a solid example of creative 'can-do', including the smooth integration of Federal-, State, and City-funding to distribute the fiscal load and risks with this experimental project.  But this push by one myopic individual (Ed. Dir. M.K.Taylor) to throw out the project into the winter not only stops any physical work on it until deep into Spring and steady 50+-degrees weather to allow epoxy- and paint-work.  It damages all of our efforts to make positive, 'good' headlines to put Gloucester into a better light, than its depiction across recent negative episodes.

                                                          I hope for your support to keep this project inside to be completed by me and the State-tasked manpower (see below).  
                                                          The current plan is for Jeffrey Richon to use his crane to pull her out by Friday morning Dec. 30 2011.
                                                               If he is dead-set in this destructive approach, I would need to find heated space measuring 50'x15' to complete the work.  Alas, the budget was expended months ago (see below).  
                                                          Mid-Winter launching of her is technically perfectly doable, as long as there is no ice at the launching-ramp.  The State's DMF-biologists have work to do year-round (see below as well). 

                                                          Finally, she needs to be finished for me to receive my final payment of a flat-fee set for the expected 4-5 month part-time supervisory role - versus my now full-time April-to-December+ investment.

                                                          Thank you for taking the time to view the craft yesterday.
                                                                Yours sincerely
                                                          Susanne Altenburger
                                                          Phil Bolger & Friends Inc.
                                                          66 Atlantic Street
                                                          Gloucester MA 01930-1627

                                                          -----------

                                                          Building a Navy Patrol-Boat / State Marine-Biological Research Craft at GMHC 
                                                          Project-Status as of Dec. 28th 2011

                                                          A.  Project Basics (see attached .pdf):
                                                          1.  The Boat-Building Project will serve as a limited-time experimental type for the Navy to confirm or reject its viability for their particular political and tactical purposes.

                                                          2.  The craft will then become the latest and 'greenest' marine-biological research craft for use by the Commonwealth's of Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF), its leading marine biological research agency, with its Director Paul Diodati now just elected as the Chief of all such East-Coast agencies for a two-year term 2011-2013.

                                                          3.
                                                            The Project was brought to GMHC (now GM) by Exec. Dir. Harriet Webster and myself, Susanne Altenburger of Phil Bolger &Friends Inc (PB&F), in light of its match with both the organization's
                                                          a.) marine-industrial mission as America's oldest continuously operating shipyard,  and its
                                                          b.) marine-biological educational program.
                                                          We both embraced this collaboration because of its inherent and obvious potency as an educational and public-relations tool in support of the Center and the Working Waterfront.  

                                                          While various funding-sources were successfully choreographed, the only serious uncertainty was the expected total man-hours it would take to complete the Project.  As the subsequent saga of of good and bad crew-behavior has documented  this concern would be confirmed as a major challenge.  All three members were recommended either by Jeffrey Richon or from within GMHC. 
                                                          To recollect, 
                                                          - Foreman Jose Leland's apparently indulged in drug-use before work on weekdays, as documented by his arrest one April Wednesday morning for Driving Under the Influence and Possession With Intent to Distribute, with his work-ethic spotty from good over indifferent to damaging, to finally see him walk off the job when held accountable for a series of expensive mistakes;
                                                          Matt Cooney was never able to show up on time (except for once), typically exhibited unwillingness to wear eye, ear and breathing protection, was unwilling/unable(?) to learn from repeated mistakes, and came to express a very poor opinion on this Project and the design, upon which he was fired by me.  Both Richon and Leland expressed their strong disagreement with my decision as a Project-Manager (?!).  
                                                          - Sarah Tuvim was able to do decent work, but never to the schedule dictated by the budget and timeline, and was eventually eased out.
                                                          With 3 out of 3 folks not performing as necessary, the much reduced rate of progress was unavoidable.
                                                          - My hiring of Rosalyn Frontiera proved a good move with her consistent performance as the longest-serving productive crew-member across many month, and even now offering periodically up to full days of volunteer work.
                                                          - In terms of my own effort on the shop-floor, intended by contract to just supervise the Project part-time, I went from 5 days per week by April, to 6-days Summer and Fall, with the last month seeing 7-days work-weeks.
                                                           
                                                          4.  The Project is built of 90% sustainably-sourced materials - US farm-grown Douglas Fir marine-grade plywood -, with the remaining approx. 10% based on fossil fuel, used here to enhance the wood's strength and life-expectancy.  This approach contrasts with the typically 100% synthetic/man-made and often high-carbon approach for all-fiberglass-, steel- or aluminum-construction.  
                                                               The US-Navy is very familiar with modern wood-composite construction, operating a fleet of 12 1400+tons heavy wood-composite Minesweepers, built in the late 80-and 90s.  Fully-loaded this craft here will weigh in around 4 tons.  

                                                          5.  The boat, as it has emerged throughout much of this year in full public view on the Boat Shop's floor, is a demonstration of an advanced way to design and build Lower-Carbon craft, explicitly initiated by the Navy to be built this way, and supported fiscally and now also with a growing number of 'man-days' by DMF staff coming in to help with two+-handed jobs to conclude to project more rapidly.  Both agencies continue to support the project.


                                                          B.  Project position within GMHC/GM:
                                                          1.
                                                            Beyond initial collaborative efforts between GMHC/GM under Webster and PB&F under Altenburger, GMHC/GM had to devote only very limited resources to attract and retain the Project.  In return it received one major attraction to its range of exhibits with this largest-yet boat-construction effort in its Boat-Shop with its final purpose to serve as a marine-biological research-platform for the State.

                                                          2.
                                                            The Project began in early March 2011 with Harriet Webster falling ill in March as well, to then pass away in June.   Despite well-documented challenges with the initial building crew, Altenburger continued the project, eventually even single-handed much of the time to its current near-completed status.

                                                          3.  As of late-December all structural work is done on the Project, with most painting completed, with only the aft-cockpit remaining to be assembled out of mostly already pre-fabricated and pre-painted panels.  Glass is ready to be installed to make her weather-tight, with the motor on hand.  Electrical and minor mechanical system can be completed outside of the shop.  The State via DMF is willing to continue its tasking of manpower in support of this Project to complete it as soon as possible.

                                                          4.  Agreed by all stake-holders in April 2010 to be brought to GMHC, over 11-month of lead-time was available for the educational staff to integrate this 'Signature Project' into its curriculum.  Altenburger stood ready to share information, drawings, possibly even connections with the stake-holders on the State and Federal levels, such as Marine-Biologists.  

                                                          5.  Approached again this summer by Altenburger on this issue,  Mary-Kay Taylor (Director of Education) did refuse again to make this emerging marine-biology research-craft part of the offerings for the children and youth brought to the Center.  While the public had full access to come into the shop to study the Project, ask questions, touch the craft and watched work on it, no scheduled integration for school-children and adolescents was initiated to share this rare opportunity with the clients (and their parents, teachers, administrators) the organization is drawing much of its budget from.   While over 1150 visitors were personally welcomed and responded to on the Boat Shop floor, no educational sessions were held there, with minor (accidental) exceptions when I pulled in an Instructor, such as from the Merrimack Valley Educational consortium, or a driver such as a school from Marlborough, and schooner- and Outward-Bound crews.  No organized dedicated integration of this project was pursued. 
                                                              
                                                          6.  Instead, this Project of building right on site of an Advanced Marine-Biological Research Craft to high sustainability-coefficiency for the State's prime marine-biological agency (DMF) has been perceived by Mary Kay as a hindrance to her professional interests, literally described by her as a large physical obstacle to her particular definition of the organization's educational mission.  Her perspective and actions suggest that this Project was and remains is an unwelcome intrusion without any educational value to merit focus on.  Hence her push towards this Project's expulsion from the Boat Shop. 

                                                          7.  Meanwhile, DMF-staffers on the shop-floor have so far included
                                                          - the gear-specialists in charge of maintaining and even developing DMF's range of research-assets, both land-bound and sea-going;
                                                          - Marine-Biologists who have begun to integrate the emerging craft into their vision for the work in 2012, such as for instance Eel-Grass Research, incl. diving-operations;
                                                          - Liaison-officer connecting Federal funding to the State's agencies;
                                                          - the agency's Director himself, Paul Diodati, with a strong personal interest as the Chief of the State's marine-biological research.

                                                          8.
                                                            Other elected and appointed visitors include,
                                                          - Mayor Kirk,
                                                          - Congressman John Tierney,
                                                          - the US Navy delegation who visited several times already, incl. their testing staff,
                                                          - State Senator Bruce Tarr,
                                                          - staffers from Senators Kerry's and Brown's offices,
                                                          - the head of the Mass. Cultural Council,
                                                          - City Councilors Hardy, Tobey and McGeary,
                                                          - the head of the city's Fisheries Commission, David Bergeron,
                                                          - Coast Guard officers,
                                                          - State Environmental Police officers,
                                                          - City police officers,
                                                          etc...    
                                                            
                                                          9.  GMHC/GM's education staffers did not seek to cultivate relations with either DMF-chief Diodati, nor his biologists, gear-specialists, administrators etc.  nor the members of our political leadership in connection to this Project.  Instead a great sense of growing aggravation has been expressed as to the longer-than-expected presence of the craft and all these visitors and State and Federal stake-holders.  Complaints have been issued again and again how the Project jeopardizes the educational mission of GMHC/GM.  No understanding of its potent value has been demonstrated in words or deeds. 

                                                          10.  Explicitly embraced by the late Harriet Webster because of its obvious and explicit and now proven Multiplier Potential - with for instance the State's major marine-biological players attracted to the Project and thus GMHC/GM  - this Project manifests one already successful model of partnership across multiple levels of government and private for-profit and non-profit entities.   Webster and Altenburger forged this relationship in hopes of building upon it.   
                                                              
                                                          Myopia was explicitly rejected, with a large-aperture optic understood to be the key to make this Project successful and set one more potent precedent to grow both GMHC/GM's capabilities and the viability of Gloucester Marine-Industrial and Marine-Scientific prospects by integrating them in this particular Project.  


                                                          C.  Project Outlook:
                                                          1.
                                                            The Navy continues its support for the Project, and the State has recently increased its initial investment by tasking man-power towards rapid completion of the Project.

                                                          2.  The Project's completion depends upon 50+ degrees F ambient temperature to allow epoxy and paint to cure.

                                                          3.  The Project retains its potency to serve as a rare and temporary (!) educational tool teaching aspects of
                                                          - design,
                                                          - sustainable materials,
                                                          - the role of advanced chemistry to support sustainability,
                                                          - using your hands to build this larger structure that will work for science on the water ,
                                                          - demonstrating the science, technologies, and associated trades it is based on,
                                                          - the chance to possibly be aboard her while she works.

                                                          4.  In terms of Boat-Shop use:
                                                          - the Project's longer-than-expected presence on the shop-floor does not break new ground with other projects with one measuring 32feet x5'6" (vs. this Project's 39'x7'6) present for up to two years;
                                                          - it has added no additional or more dangerous chemicals to both the shop's documented stock, and history of prior uses;
                                                          - it has been compressed in its total foot-print to less than half the shop's floor-plan and work-bench surfaces;
                                                          scheduling co-use of the Boat Shop has been practiced successfully in the past, and has offered repeatedly here as well, incl. the careful timing of painting session not before class-room use etc;
                                                          - the Project is close to completion, with Altenburger and DMF having presented an unambiguous track-record of pushing hard to finish it.

                                                          5.  Ejecting the Project from the Boat Shop at this time will
                                                          - sever the relationship with PB&F,
                                                          - likely dims prospects for GM's relationship with DMF and related Federal agencies,
                                                          - signals to associated schools and organizations (GMHC/GM's client-base) a troubling incoherence of vision and thus inconsistency of curricular offerings to the students, 
                                                          - will terminate any remaining chance for your clients (students, parents, teachers, administrators) to study and learn from this rare collaborative Project, or even be part of it in some way.
                                                          - will signal to current and potential funders how myopia of a very few (Mary-Kay Taylor et. al.) led GMHC/GM to reject this Project's rich range of educational and funding opportunities along with its inherent professional relationships deep into the State's marine-biological establishment, typically deemed essential to affiliated individuals and institution. 

                                                                                                            --------------------------------------------------------

                                                          This perspective by Susanne Altenburger of Phil Bolger & Friends, and Project-Manager for the publicly-funded SACPAS-3 Project will serve to explain the situation to all stake-holders and other interest parties.

                                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                                          Sent: Wednesday, December 28, 2011 3:21 PM
                                                          Subject: [bolger] Re: Micro Construction

                                                           


                                                          On Micros and HP... We sailed our Micro in the English Channel with it's big tides and suchlike with a 2.2HP motor and we never found we wanted more power. Truth be told I resented the amount of weigt the 2.2 took up wiht it's gas.

                                                          By the way we have driven our CAL 34 with a Tohatsu two stroke 5HP quite happily so 5HP has more than enough oomph for a Micro (well unless you want to take someone water skiing).

                                                          Bob
                                                          http://boatbits.blogspot.com/
                                                          http://fishingundersail.blogspot.com/
                                                          http://islandgourmand.blogspot.com/

                                                        • BruceHallman
                                                          On Mon, Jan 9, 2012 at 9:10 AM, Susanne@comcast.net ... Susanne, This is exciting! Judging from the photos in MAIB the boat looks to be nearly ready to
                                                          Message 28 of 28 , Jan 9, 2012
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                                                            On Mon, Jan 9, 2012 at 9:10 AM, Susanne@...
                                                            <philbolger@...> wrote:
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            > An up-date:
                                                            >     The project was moved out uneventfully on Friday the 30th '11.
                                                            > By Thursday, Jan. 5th she arrived alongside RESOLUTION, to nestle there for the next few...
                                                            > Onwards and upwards.
                                                            >
                                                            > I'll try to get photos uploaded...
                                                            > Susanne
                                                            >


                                                            Susanne, This is exciting! Judging from the photos in MAIB the boat
                                                            looks to be nearly ready to launch. Though, (believe me I know!),
                                                            there can be lots of time consuming finishing touches that remain
                                                            unseen in the photos.
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