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Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

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  • Chris Crandall
    A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood, without toxic glues
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 20, 2011
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      A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
      fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
      without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
      Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
      save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
      saw and a dumpster.
    • Clayton Ford
      . . . and then the toxic items go to the landfill. Make sure you take the remains to a landfill that deals with toxic waste. I firmly believe that any man s
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 20, 2011
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        . . . and then the toxic items go to the landfill. Make sure you take the remains to a landfill that deals with toxic waste.

        "I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is that moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle-victorious."Vince Lombardi

        "You cannot take away freedom to protect it, you cannot destroy the free market to save it, and you cannot uphold freedom by silencing those with whom you disagree. To take rights away to defend them or to spend your way out of debt defies common sense." Glenn Beck

        'Be thou humble; and the Lord thy God shall lead thee by the hand, and give thee answer to thy prayers' (D&C 112:10)

         

        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        From: crandall@...
        Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2011 08:43:39 -0500
        Subject: [bolger] Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

         
        A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
        fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
        without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
        Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
        save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
        saw and a dumpster.


      • Doug
        All that toxic wast is taken from the environment and It all goes back. Burning is just faster. We poor ignorant slobs here on planet earth don t make
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 20, 2011
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              All that toxic wast is taken from the environment and It all goes back. Burning is just faster. We poor ignorant slobs here on planet earth don't make anything, we convert one thing to another but then it's
           still all here in the end.                           Doug

          On 09/20/2011 01:23 PM, Clayton Ford wrote:
           

          . . . and then the toxic items go to the landfill. Make sure you take the remains to a landfill that deals with toxic waste.

          "I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is that moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle-victorious." Vince Lombardi

          "You cannot take away freedom to protect it, you cannot destroy the free market to save it, and you cannot uphold freedom by silencing those with whom you disagree. To take rights away to defend them or to spend your way out of debt defies common sense." Glenn Beck

          'Be thou humble; and the Lord thy God shall lead thee by the hand, and give thee answer to thy prayers' (D&C 112:10)

           

          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          From: crandall@...
          Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2011 08:43:39 -0500
          Subject: [bolger] Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

           
          A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
          fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
          without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
          Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
          save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
          saw and a dumpster.



        • Doug
          Forgot to add this:-) Doug
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 20, 2011
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            Forgot to add this :-)                                                                                   Doug


            On 09/20/2011 01:35 PM, Doug wrote:
             

                All that toxic wast is taken from the environment and It all goes back. Burning is just faster. We poor ignorant slobs here on planet earth don't make anything, we convert one thing to another but then it's
             still all here in the end.                           Doug

            On 09/20/2011 01:23 PM, Clayton Ford wrote:

             

            . . . and then the toxic items go to the landfill. Make sure you take the remains to a landfill that deals with toxic waste.

            "I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is that moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle-victorious." Vince Lombardi

            "You cannot take away freedom to protect it, you cannot destroy the free market to save it, and you cannot uphold freedom by silencing those with whom you disagree. To take rights away to defend them or to spend your way out of debt defies common sense." Glenn Beck

            'Be thou humble; and the Lord thy God shall lead thee by the hand, and give thee answer to thy prayers' (D&C 112:10)

             

            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            From: crandall@...
            Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2011 08:43:39 -0500
            Subject: [bolger] Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

             
            A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
            fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
            without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
            Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
            save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
            saw and a dumpster.




        • jaybaz
          What if I wanted to build a boat that could be safely burned at end of life? What is OK to use? It seems like finishes are the greatest concern. Pine tar-based
          Message 5 of 17 , Sep 20, 2011
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            What if I wanted to build a boat that could be safely burned at end of life? What is OK to use?

            It seems like finishes are the greatest concern.

            Pine tar-based boat sauce OK?

            -J



            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Chris Crandall <crandall@...> wrote:
            >
            > A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
            > fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
            > without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
            > Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
            > save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
            > saw and a dumpster.
            >
          • John Huft
            Bronze boat nails, oakum, etc. Ah heck, just stand upwind. John Boy   You can trust me, I have a degree in science... ________________________________ From:
            Message 6 of 17 , Sep 20, 2011
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              Bronze boat nails, oakum, etc.
              Ah heck, just stand upwind.
              John Boy
               


              You can trust me, I have a degree in science...




              From: jaybaz <jay@...>
              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 1:58 PM
              Subject: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

               
              What if I wanted to build a boat that could be safely burned at end of life? What is OK to use?

              It seems like finishes are the greatest concern.

              Pine tar-based boat sauce OK?

              -J

              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Chris Crandall <crandall@...> wrote:
              >
              > A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
              > fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
              > without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
              > Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
              > save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
              > saw and a dumpster.
              >



            • L
              Gopher wood? From: jaybaz To: bolger@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 2:58 PM Subject: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for
              Message 7 of 17 , Sep 20, 2011
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                Gopher wood?
                 
                From: jaybaz <jay@...>
                To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 2:58 PM
                Subject: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

                What if I wanted to build a boat that could be safely burned at end of life? What is OK to use?

                It seems like finishes are the greatest concern.

                Pine tar-based boat sauce OK?

                -J



                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Chris Crandall <crandall@...> wrote:
                >
                > A short reminder:  Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
                > fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
                > without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
                > Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
                > save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
                > saw and a dumpster.
                >




                ------------------------------------

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              • L
                  Bronze contains copper, use trunnels. From: John Huft To: bolger@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, September
                Message 8 of 17 , Sep 20, 2011
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                  Bronze contains copper, use trunnels.
                  From: John Huft <t1ro2003@...>
                  To: "bolger@yahoogroups.com" <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:30 PM
                  Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea



                  Bronze boat nails, oakum, etc.
                  Ah heck, just stand upwind.
                  John Boy
                   


                  You can trust me, I have a degree in science...



                  From: jaybaz <jay@...>
                  To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 1:58 PM
                  Subject: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

                   
                  What if I wanted to build a boat that could be safely burned at end of life? What is OK to use?

                  It seems like finishes are the greatest concern.

                  Pine tar-based boat sauce OK?

                  -J

                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Chris Crandall <crandall@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
                  > fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
                  > without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
                  > Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
                  > save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
                  > saw and a dumpster.
                  >







                • Susanne@comcast.net
                  - No lead of any sort is typically added to the structure of any ply/epoxy/glass boat. - Cured epoxy is inert - as in innocuous - as is the epoxy in the
                  Message 9 of 17 , Sep 21, 2011
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                    - No lead of any sort is typically added to the structure of any ply/epoxy/glass boat.

                    - Cured epoxy is inert - as in innocuous - as is the epoxy in the dentures in your mouth or in the new hip-joint.

                    - Whenever the wood rots out once fully exposed to water via cuts, what remains are odd-shaped plastic pieces with glass-cloth in it. 

                    - Do not breath in too much glass-fiber dust, but chewing on it might add 'fiber' to your diet.  Otherwise it does not 'pollute' any more than finding 1800-year old glass in pieces or unbroken in a Roman legion's garbage-dump; museums in Europe feature ample such finds. 

                    - So, the dumpster seems the way to go.

                    - But compared to what certain industries have the license to emit, burning a skiff seems mild. 

                    - Furthermore, the other day a 6-apartment wood frame house with vinyl-siding etc. burned down nearby.   Compared to these tragedies, how many hulls would ever be burned ?

                    Still the dumpster seems the 'cleanest'.  

                    Susanne Altenburger, PB&F

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: L
                    Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:35 PM
                    Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

                     

                     
                    Bronze contains copper, use trunnels.
                    From: John Huft <t1ro2003@...>
                    To: "bolger@yahoogroups.com" <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:30 PM
                    Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea



                    Bronze boat nails, oakum, etc.
                    Ah heck, just stand upwind.
                    John Boy
                     


                    You can trust me, I have a degree in science...



                    From: jaybaz <jay@...>
                    To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 1:58 PM
                    Subject: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

                     
                    What if I wanted to build a boat that could be safely burned at end of life? What is OK to use?

                    It seems like finishes are the greatest concern.

                    Pine tar-based boat sauce OK?

                    -J

                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Chris Crandall <crandall@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
                    > fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
                    > without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
                    > Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
                    > save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
                    > saw and a dumpster.
                    >







                  • Peter
                    ... There a couple of Olympic sailors who burned their boat after the races. IIRC, it was an Etchells that had been dropped and the internal stiffness
                    Message 10 of 17 , Sep 21, 2011
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                      >
                      > - So, the dumpster seems the way to go.
                      >

                      There a couple of Olympic sailors who burned their boat after the races. IIRC, it was an Etchells that had been dropped and the internal stiffness destroyed. It made an ugly, smokey fire. A nice crisp wood fire is one thing, but burning plastic is a mess.
                    • goganrob
                      Interesting question about how to get rid of an unwanted wooden boat... here are a couple of thoughts from a professional recycler: 1. Reusing is always
                      Message 11 of 17 , Sep 21, 2011
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                        Interesting question about how to get rid of an unwanted wooden boat... here are a couple of thoughts from a professional recycler:

                        1. Reusing is always better than disposal. If you can't sell an old boat, donate it to one of the many museums, boatbuilding yards or schools that are looking for projects. "Messing About in Boats" or Wooden Boat" classified ads might tempt a reader to come pick up your free boat too. CraigsList "Free" section will also get you some kind of response. Some links for donation: http://www.apprenticeshop.org/donate-volunteer/donate-a-boat/; http://www.boatswithcauses.org/donate-boat-va.htm ; http://www.pacificmarine.org/boat-donations-why.shtml

                        2. Compost the boat. Set the old vessel in a scruffy patch of a local yard, fill with soil (and maybe plant daisies as David Jost joked about doing with his terminally ill "Pointy Skiff") and let nature take its course. Eventually insects and microbes in the soil will digest all the wood fibers and leave behind resins, glass and metal objects. The decomposers will exhale CO2, a greenhouse gas, but no more than will be sequestered by the forests growing wood to make the plywood for your next project. Avoid composting the boat near vegetable gardens as lead, copper and tin in anti-fouling bottom paints will leach into soil. If after 10 years or so you want to pretty up that corner of the yard, you can safely dig up the remaining glass fiber and resins, fold them up and landfill them. Nearly all the wood fibers will have been recovered back into the soil. Keep in mind though that the area will never be fit for vegetable growing or children's play space, however, due to the toxic residue of the bottom paint. Maybe if you used pine tar on the bottom, as Jay suggests, the end result would be less toxic.

                        3. Landfill the boat. Chop it into sections with a sawz-all and send it to a disposal facility that buries trash in a RCRA-approved municipal waste landfill. In addition to the heavy metals mentioned above, you will be introducing methane from anaerobic digestion into the atmosphere from the break-down of the wood fibers, as methane recovery and flaring systems are at best about 50% effective. Methane is a greenhouse gas 20 times more powerful than the CO2 generated from composting. As with composting, the landfill soil will be permanently poisoned for vegetable growing, but there are so many other toxins in a post-industrial landfill that it's already ruined for this purpose... Perhaps your craft will grace the peak of your local Mount Trashmore, as does this specimen in Montana:
                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/37034730@N00/5369529782/

                        4. Incinerate the boat. In order to avoid generating lots of dioxins, soots, furans and other toxins (named and unnamed) from partial combustion of hydrocarbons, get the boat to a state-of-the-art municipal trash incinerator. Ideally, the boat would also be cut into small pieces to expose the maximum surface area of the boat pieces to air and flame. The hottest fire burns the cleanest! You will help the incinerator get plenty of BTU's to generate electricity, but you will also force the facility to expel more of the heavy metals mentioned above into the air we breathe (fly ash not filtered at the smokestacks) and water we drink (bottom ash that leaks out of the ash landfill eventually).

                        5. Viking funeral. If you burn the boat in the open air at comparatively low temperatures, you will disperse lots of nasty toxins into the atmosphere, fail to capture the resulting energy, drop toxic ash onto the ground (or if truly in the Viking spirit, into the water) after the fire goes out. If you choose this route, at least take videos and post them so that you'll capture the entertainment value for all us closet pyromaniacs... and build your next boat better, so you won't have this disposal problem again!

                        Sorry for this long post but you got me thinking!

                        --Rob Gogan
                        Sailor of Bolger Micro "2 by 2" built by David Jost
                        Author of "Cape Cod Harbors" in "MAIB"

                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, L <lew_clayman@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Gopher wood?
                        >
                        > From: jaybaz <jay@...>
                        > To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 2:58 PM
                        > Subject: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea
                        >
                        > What if I wanted to build a boat that could be safely burned at end of life? What is OK to use?
                        >
                        > It seems like finishes are the greatest concern.
                        >
                        > Pine tar-based boat sauce OK?
                        >
                        > -J
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Chris Crandall <crandall@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > A short reminder:  Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
                        > > fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
                        > > without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
                        > > Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
                        > > save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
                        > > saw and a dumpster.
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Bolger rules!!!
                        > - NO "GO AWAY SPAMMER!" posts!!!  Please!
                        > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, respamming, or flogging dead horses
                        > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                        > - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                        > - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                        > - Unsubscribe:  bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                        >
                      • L
                        I m sorry, but something else is even worse is never a justification for anything.  Everything else is even worse might be a justification, but it makes
                        Message 12 of 17 , Sep 21, 2011
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                          I'm sorry, but "something else is even worse" is never a justification for anything. 
                           
                          "Everything else is even worse" might be a justification, but it makes no difference to this decision at all what "some industries" do, nor does it make any difference what "these tragedies" might release. 
                           
                          The question is "what is the RIGHT thing to do?"  Who cares that other things might be "even wronger?"
                           
                          Chewing on used fiberglass, is obviously a joke.  It's not nearly as inert as you think, in that many are allergic to it; let alone that it has sharp edges, and will keep then all the way down. 
                           
                          It certainly does pollute, in that fish rarely eat "1800 year old glass in pieces" but when they do eat glass, well, they're eating glass.  And if they live and we eat them, guess what we might eat too?
                           
                          If a Roman legion left garbage around, that is not a reason why we should.
                           
                          The dumpster is probably best, but do try and find out where the dumpster-dumpers will be dumping it.......
                           
                          From: "Susanne@..." <philbolger@...>
                          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2011 8:00 AM
                          Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea



                          - No lead of any sort is typically added to the structure of any ply/epoxy/glass boat.

                          - Cured epoxy is inert - as in innocuous - as is the epoxy in the dentures in your mouth or in the new hip-joint.

                          - Whenever the wood rots out once fully exposed to water via cuts, what remains are odd-shaped plastic pieces with glass-cloth in it. 

                          - Do not breath in too much glass-fiber dust, but chewing on it might add 'fiber' to your diet.  Otherwise it does not 'pollute' any more than finding 1800-year old glass in pieces or unbroken in a Roman legion's garbage-dump; museums in Europe feature ample such finds. 

                          - So, the dumpster seems the way to go.

                          - But compared to what certain industries have the license to emit, burning a skiff seems mild. 

                          - Furthermore, the other day a 6-apartment wood frame house with vinyl-siding etc. burned down nearby.   Compared to these tragedies, how many hulls would ever be burned ?

                          Still the dumpster seems the 'cleanest'.  

                          Susanne Altenburger, PB&F

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: L
                          Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:35 PM
                          Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

                           
                           
                          Bronze contains copper, use trunnels.
                          From: John Huft <t1ro2003@...>
                          To: "bolger@yahoogroups.com" <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:30 PM
                          Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea



                          Bronze boat nails, oakum, etc.
                          Ah heck, just stand upwind.
                          John Boy
                           


                          You can trust me, I have a degree in science...



                          From: jaybaz <jay@...>
                          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 1:58 PM
                          Subject: [bolger] Re: Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

                           
                          What if I wanted to build a boat that could be safely burned at end of life? What is OK to use?

                          It seems like finishes are the greatest concern.

                          Pine tar-based boat sauce OK?

                          -J

                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Chris Crandall <crandall@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
                          > fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
                          > without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
                          > Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
                          > save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
                          > saw and a dumpster.
                          >











                        • dnjost
                          So sorry everyone, I had no idea I was going to set off a maelstrom of opinions here, but it is the Internet. I admit to disposing of my old Diablo in small
                          Message 13 of 17 , Sep 21, 2011
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                            So sorry everyone,

                            I had no idea I was going to set off a maelstrom of opinions here, but it is the Internet. I admit to disposing of my old Diablo in small cut up chunks taken out with the trash. I used a skill saw, chain saw, and sledge hammer. the hardware from the boat now sits on the Clam Skiff (have I told you how much I love this boat!) and learned a lot about what I did wrong in the building process that I have used to improve my skills. I did not burn it. And.....I promise not to set the PS on fire. My neighbors would take offense to it anyways. PS may just eventually rot while supporting a small number of strawberry plants, leaving behind small amounts of fiber reinforced areas and the handful of bronze nails to some future civilization to ponder their history and uses in the primative 21st century. Whether this takes place next to Kelly the Wonderdog or Goldie the exfish, or in the local landfill (or perhaps the trash to energy plant in Millbury) remains to be seen.

                            But firts, I will be making an attempt to rescue the Pointy Skiff from it's watery grave by cutting and then glue/clench nailing on a new layer via lapsrake construction. I always wanted to try it, and this seems like a good afternoon or two of work spent well and it beats watching the Red Sox these days. If this doesn't work will build a June Bug. Always wanted one for paddling the Charles, Sudbury, and Concord rivers. It seems like a rather civilized and simple approach.

                            Not to make light of boatyard safety: don't breath the lead fumes, wear safety glasses, good gloves, face mask, and be smart about the dust. Glass fibers can embed in the lungs, mahogany dust is also bad for you. Be smart, be safe, and enjoy building.

                            Happy Building,
                            David
                          • Myles Swift
                            Rob, Two comments. On point #2, most trailer boats don t have toxic bottom paint. Most boats with bottom paint are far less toxic than they used to be. I
                            Message 14 of 17 , Sep 22, 2011
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                              Rob,

                               

                              Two comments. On point #2, most trailer boats don’t have toxic bottom paint. Most boats with bottom paint are far less toxic than they used to be. I switched to vinyl bottom paint to reduce toxicity and because it can take some drying out on the trailer without losing the anti-fouling properties. This is a good argument for graphite/epoxy bottoms. On point #3, some landfill methane systems are pretty efficient. The local one has a generating station, gas is not flared off, it powers the facility.

                               

                              MylesJ, fellow Micro owner

                            • Stefan Topolski
                              Amen about toxic comes from nature and it will go back. Nature magazine recently published about the gulf oil spill and other spills as evidence that
                              Message 15 of 17 , Oct 4, 2011
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                                Amen about toxic comes from nature and it will go back.  Nature magazine recently published about the gulf oil spill and other spills as evidence that oil-eating bacteria in soil and water can do a lot more than we ever realized to eat the oil and restore the natural balance... given some time, but the damage is never permanent.

                                All the Best,
                                Stefan

                                "One gathers peace as a feather in the palm of one's hand."    -anonymous

                                Stefan Topolski  MD
                                Assist. Professor, U. of Massachusetts Medical School
                                Clinical Instructor, U. of New England
                                Founder and Director of
                                Caring in Community, Inc.  501(c)3
                                1105 Mohawk Trail
                                Shelburne Falls, Ma.





                                El sep 20, 2011, a las 1:35 pm, Doug escribió:

                                 

                                    All that toxic wast is taken from the environment and It all goes back. Burning is just faster. We poor ignorant slobs here on planet earth don't make anything, we convert one thing to another but then it's
                                 still all here in the end.                           Doug

                                On 09/20/2011 01:23 PM, Clayton Ford wrote:

                                 

                                . . . and then the toxic items go to the landfill. Make sure you take the remains to a landfill that deals with toxic waste.

                                "I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is that moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle-victorious." Vince Lombardi

                                "You cannot take away freedom to protect it, you cannot destroy the free market to save it, and you cannot uphold freedom by silencing those with whom you disagree. To take rights away to defend them or to spend your way out of debt defies common sense." Glenn Beck

                                'Be thou humble; and the Lord thy God shall lead thee by the hand, and give thee answer to thy prayers' (D&C 112:10)

                                 

                                To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                From: crandall@...
                                Date: Tue, 20 Sep 2011 08:43:39 -0500
                                Subject: [bolger] Viking funeral for boat--probably A Bad Idea

                                 
                                A short reminder: Burning epoxy and polyester creates toxic and harmful
                                fumes; holding one is a Pyrrhic victory. If your boat is all wood,
                                without toxic glues or lead paint, fire away. But if it's a typical
                                Bolger boat, with epoxy, polyester, red lead, white lead, etc., then
                                save yourself, your family, and your neighbors, by use of reciprocating
                                saw and a dumpster.





                              • Stefan Topolski
                                a complete mess - BLECHH. All the Best, Stefan ... There a couple of Olympic sailors who burned their boat after the races. IIRC, it was an Etchells that had
                                Message 16 of 17 , Oct 4, 2011
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                                  a complete mess - BLECHH.

                                  All the Best,
                                  Stefan



                                  El sep 21, 2011, a las 11:15 am, Peter escribió:

                                   

                                  >
                                  > - So, the dumpster seems the way to go.
                                  >

                                  There a couple of Olympic sailors who burned their boat after the races. IIRC, it was an Etchells that had been dropped and the internal stiffness destroyed. It made an ugly, smokey fire. A nice crisp wood fire is one thing, but burning plastic is a mess.


                                • Chris Crandall
                                  It s not much good if some time is thousands of years. Or more.
                                  Message 17 of 17 , Oct 5, 2011
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                                    It's not much good if "some time" is thousands of years. Or more.

                                    On 10/5/11 8:36 AM, bolger@yahoogroups.com wrote:
                                    > Amen about toxic comes from nature and it will go back. Nature
                                    > magazine recently published about the gulf oil spill and other spills
                                    > as evidence that oil-eating bacteria in soil and water can do a lot
                                    > more than we ever realized to eat the oil and restore the natural
                                    > balance... given some time, but the damage is never permanent.
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