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Rig 92

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  • adventures_in_astrophotography
    The latest BDQ article on Rondo II had me looking up the rig in 100 Small Boat Rigs. In that chapter (92), Phil states that the rig has 16 separate pieces of
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 8, 2011
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      The latest BDQ article on Rondo II had me looking up the rig in 100 Small Boat Rigs. In that chapter (92), Phil states that the rig has 16 separate pieces of running rigging, 19 if halyards are used on the spritsails. I tried to count these and came up short:

      3 sprit snotters
      3 sprit boom snotters
      3 spritsail sheets
      1 jib halyard
      1 jib tack downhaul
      2 jib sheets

      That's 13. I can get 16 if I add 3 spritsail downhauls - is that what I missed?

      Jon
    • c.ruzer
      Jon, interesting question. The deckplan and the Rondo II building key at 59. Thimble (NB not plural) for jib sheet lead. indicate Rondo II has but one jib
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 9, 2011
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        Jon, interesting question. The deckplan and the Rondo II building key at "59. Thimble (NB not plural) for jib sheet lead." indicate Rondo II has but one jib sheet.

        You've counted the jib tack downhaul as running rigging. I can only suppose in "100 Small Boat Rigs" PCB did so too. (I haven't got that book - I may explain why not below - make sense of such delayed gratification as you will)

        There's a similar jib on Featherwind as one example to compare this with. PCB noted concerning that: "The balanced club jib is the only self-tending type that needs no sheet horse across the boat to set well (which is partly an indication of why there's only the one jib sheet shown on the plans of both boats, I'd say)..." He continued on to note "the upward pull on the luff does the job of holding the clew down." So here, if the luff is stretched tight by halyard tensioning then the "tack downhaul" isn't really a downhaul, rather it's a kind of "tack retainer", a fixture, indeed more like fixed sailplan rigging. Is it some kind of "pennant"?

        I'd say on Rondo II it's fixed permanently by way of a splice through the cleats or whatyamacallits on the boom and the tail is made off fast to the bow-sprit somehow before raising the sail. (Is that "somehow" the noted snaphook marked indistinctly on the sailplan, or is that snaphook for the bow-sprit guy?) On Featherwind the jib "tack retainer" is described as "26. Jib club... (club dimensions are first specified, then...) Pennant 3/8" dacron spliced around club and tail belayed to 5" wood cleat bolted (not screwed) to #2 bulkhead..." (Not to be confused on this rig with "23. Forward preventer 1/4" dacron spliced into becket of jib block, led down through cringles on axis of jib, to stopper knot under hole in foredeck." This "forward preventer" is effectively a forestay with a quickly rigged two part running tail by way of that block attached to its lower end.)

        I think "pennants" are not usually counted as running or fixed rigging, rather they are lines that are fixed at one end for whatever other purposes. Here though, in what contemporary convention would hold is not a usual rig, it's probably fair enough to call it part of the rig rather than a part_of_a_part of the rig like a sail clew pennant, for example. What part should it be called, standing or running? Despite one end not moving or being readily adjustable under sail by hauling, I believe PCB held the jib club pennant here to be a part of the running rigging!

        If we, and PCB, check off the "jib tack downhaul" as part of running rigging, then by extension of the above reasoning we and PCB may also check off the three Rondo II sprit boom snotter and peak sprit snotter slings as running rigging. Checking off the count this way there are:

        3 sprit snotters
        3 sprit boom snotters
        3 spritsail sheets
        3 snotter slings
        3 spritsail downhauls
        1 jib halyard
        1 jib tack downhaul
        1 jib sheet
        --------------
        18 in total

        What's still missing? Well, if spritsail down hauls, snotter slings and pennants may count as running rigging there also are:

        "57. Lanyard with stopper knot and 3" thimble is fairlead for mizzen sheet."

        "58. Pad eyes for standing end and lead thimble of foresail sheet." There's two of these "#58 pad eyes" shown on the deck plan either side of a hatch implying a rope horse to span the hatch opening. The lead thimble could be spliced into the horse, but more usual it would be a sliding attachment and not a thimble for the sheet lead which would be snapped in as on the gaff sailplan, but rather the thimble is the item sliding on the horse. In any case a rope horse length would usually be adjustable as well, ie, running, as may a snap hooked line also be. (There are three horses on the Rondo II alternate gaff sailplan. They're neccessary for better sheet lead and sail set according to point of sail. These are uneccessary for self-vanging sprit boomed spritsails, but that single one is shown due to the hatch opening being where a thimble or pad eye would be for the sheet lead.)

        I might discount the 3 spritsail downhauls as running rigging, say, and count by whatever judgement items #57, and #58, for a total of 17; 20 if spritsail halyards are also used. Something still wrong here, so try again:


        3 spritsail halyards
        3 sprit snotters
        3 sprit boom snotters
        3 spritsail sheets
        3 snotter slings
        1 jib halyard
        1 jib tack downhaul
        1 jib sheet
        1 foresail sheet horse thimble and snaphook, ie, #58
        --------------
        19 in total

        I'm not really that happy with this count either. There is that snapped on bowsprit guy...

        Whadaya reckon?


        interrogate the bolger chart,
        every phrase, every mark...


        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "adventures_in_astrophotography" <jon@...> wrote:
        >
        > The latest BDQ article on Rondo II had me looking up the rig in 100 Small Boat Rigs. In that chapter (92), Phil states that the rig has 16 separate pieces of running rigging, 19 if halyards are used on the spritsails. I tried to count these and came up short:
        >
        > 3 sprit snotters
        > 3 sprit boom snotters
        > 3 spritsail sheets
        > 1 jib halyard
        > 1 jib tack downhaul
        > 2 jib sheets
        >
        > That's 13. I can get 16 if I add 3 spritsail downhauls - is that what I missed?
        >
        > Jon
        >
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