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Re: Typhoon Bermuda

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  • itsbetterontheisland
    Sailing a production boat doesn t apply here but I m a builder building a Bolger Oldshoe and am applying what I know about the ocean to the Shoe. The speed
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 10, 2011
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      Sailing a production boat doesn't apply here but I'm a builder building a Bolger Oldshoe and am applying what I know about the ocean to the Shoe. The speed difference between a 19 footer and 35 footer is about 3 knots 5 knots more when surfing so all of us will be "caught out" that far offshore. I didn't edit our address book because I consider you all my friends, dayton

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "F Neil Simms" <f.neil.simms@...> wrote:
      >
      > Not sure a small, slow boat is the vehicle I'd want to cross the stream in and run 800 miles to Bermuda, with hurricane season ramping up. It's gonna take 8+ days to get there, and even if it's "all quiet in the tropics" when you depart, it may very well be 'noisy' by the time you get there...
      >
      > Personally, I start getting queasy come end of May here in the southeast, and don't relax until December, when considering offshore adventures. Have had to ride out one too many hurricanes over the years, I guess, even if it's just holed up a creek. I've decided to not go bluewater again unless it's in a fast boat that can maneuver out of the way of a big blow (a la the Dashew's approach).
      >
      > Course I'm not sure how this pertains to most Bolger boats, so I'll get off my soapbox...
      >
      > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, longbaymarine@ wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello to all,
      > >
      > > I've canceled the trip to Bermuda this year in the Typhoon due to the lows
      > > forming in the Caribbean. June is the month for sailing offshore but trip
      > > planning must begin with the words "all quiet in the tropics".
      >
    • Roger Padvorac
      I was wondering about the idea of fast boats escaping hurricanes when in the middle of the ocean. I tried looking, and didn t find specifics on the track
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 10, 2011
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        I was wondering about the idea of "fast" boats escaping hurricanes when in the middle of the ocean. I tried looking, and didn't find specifics on the track speed of hurricanes, however it seems like I've heard of hurricanes with a track speed of 30+ miles per hour, and very few boats can sustain that kind of speed, especial in rough seas, which is what you would be in if you are trying to outrun a hurricane.
         
        While the idea of getting accurate and current information about the forecasted storm track and traveling in a direction perpendicular to that is a good idea, some of the larger storms are hundreds of miles across and grow rapidly, so you would have to go a long ways to get out of the storm zone. This plus sudden erratic track changes makes it seem pretty risky to bet your life that you could always avoid a hurricane, regardless of its track speed, growth speed, and unexpected direction changes.
         
        Unless you have the kind of boat that can weather severe storms at sea, it seems much more reasonable to stay within a few hours of shore during hurricane season, monitor the weather forecasts, and then run for a shelter as soon as a severe storm starts forming.
         
        Sincerely,
        Roger
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "itsbetterontheisland" <itsbetterontheisland@...>
        Sent: Friday, June 10, 2011 8:27 AM
        Subject: [bolger] Re: Typhoon Bermuda

        > Sailing a production boat doesn't apply here but I'm a builder building a Bolger Oldshoe and am applying what I know about the ocean to the Shoe. The speed difference between a 19 footer and 35 footer is about 3 knots 5 knots more when surfing so all of us will be "caught out" that far offshore. I didn't edit our address book because I consider you all my friends,    dayton
        >
      • F Neil Simms
        Long and narrow Dashew-style ocean cruisers can average 240+ miles per day, and can get out of the way of a hurricane pretty easily if the cap n keeps a close
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 12, 2011
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          Long and narrow Dashew-style ocean cruisers can average 240+ miles per day, and can get out of the way of a hurricane pretty easily if the cap'n keeps a close eye on what's coming his or her way. Averaging half that in an 18' keelboat (particularly single-handed) would be pretty impressive.

          Of course, not many of us can afford 60' to 100'+ Dashew boats, but there are other lean boats that can maintain high daily averages (I've always been impressed by the 1xx J-boats in that regard).

          Not sure if any Bolger boats fall into this category (capable of >=10 knots sustained cruising in open ocean) - any suggestions?

          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "itsbetterontheisland" <itsbetterontheisland@...> wrote:
          >
          > Sailing a production boat doesn't apply here but I'm a builder building a Bolger Oldshoe and am applying what I know about the ocean to the Shoe. The speed difference between a 19 footer and 35 footer is about 3 knots 5 knots more when surfing so all of us will be "caught out" that far offshore. I didn't edit our address book because I consider you all my friends, dayton
          >
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